Mobile Home Park News Briefing

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The Washington Post: Want affordable housing? Take the chassis off manufactured houses.

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With the median selling price of U.S. homes at nearly $400,000, the rising cost of housing is a top concern of many Americans. One reason homes both new and resold are so expensive is that almost all of them have been built the traditional way — on-site, and by construction workers.

Things were different in the quarter-century after World War II, when progress in manufacturing allowed homes to be built from start to finish within a factory and delivered to the buyer’s site. Often called “mobile homes,” they offered middle- and lower-income families an affordable housing alternative. By the early 1970s, roughly 1 in 3 U.S....

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If Congress removed the permanent chassis requirement, manufactured homes would be safer, and they would be much more acceptable in traditional neighborhoods.

Few people are aware that the reason that mobile homes sit on a “boat trailer” foundation is because Congress mandates it to be that way – dating from when they did a hostile takeover of mobile home manufacturing in the 1970s. Clearly this was a decision made at the request of the single-family home building special interest groups who did not want their prices to be undercut and thought that affixing a boat trailer to the underside of a mobile home would render it a lesser competitive form of housing. Scandalous, huh?

8KPAX: Mobile home park tenants looking to relocate after eviction notice

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KALISPELL — Dozens of tenants at a mobile home community in the Flathead Valley just got eviction notices as the new owners change their business model. They have 180 days to vacate. Most are now facing an uncertain future with no other place to go.

“We’ve got people in here on fixed incomes. They can't afford move their trailers out, they're gonna lose their homes,” said Debbie Kiser Wallace, on eof the tennants at Spring Creek Mobile Home Park.

Tenants of the Spring Creek Mobile Home Park received eviction notices this month from the current owner of the park. The notice gives residents 180 days to leave the property.

“It's devastating....

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Dozens of tenants at a mobile home community in the Flathead Valley just got eviction notices as the new owners change their business model. They have 180 days to vacate. Most are now facing an uncertain future with no other place to go.

Yes, this is the future of many, many mobile home parks if lot rents do not go up substantially. Property owners are not going to stick with a mobile home parking lot if there are more lucrative options. Since you can build apartments stacked two or three high on a single mobile home lot – and rent those apartments for $2,000 per month each – it is essential that lot rents increase significantly and fast.

As I’ve written about for years now, the basic message is “Low Lot Rents = Redevelopment”. It’s not rocket science – simply common sense.

Cardinal News: Officials say grant could give boost to Southside mobile home communities

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Mobile home parks and manufactured home communities throughout Henry County and surrounding areas could be eligible for infrastructure repairs, some for the first time in years. 

Representatives of the West Piedmont Planning District Commission held two informational meetings this week to detail their plan to secure millions in rehabilitative funding through a Preservation and Reinvestment Initiative for Community Enhancement, or PRICE, grant. 

The commission is looking to apply for a $13 million piece of the $225 million pool of grant funding. 

The PRICE grant is part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s initiative...

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The commission is looking to apply for a $13 million piece of the $225 million pool of grant funding. The PRICE grant is part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s initiative to improve mobile homes or manufactured home parks. Its goals include bolstering the housing supply and weather-proofing and repairing structures, among other things.“Roofing, plumbing, doors, anything that we would do in a normal home rehabilitation,” said Chasta White, the commission’s housing programs specialist, adding that infrastructure repairs are likely to impact multiple units. “We’re looking to do paving, well and septic tank updates … broadband in some areas. We’re looking to do lighting, curb and gutter, painting, all kinds of infrastructure repairs.”

Needless to say, I hope that this occurs. Bureaucrats would be smart to invest in helping mobile home parks to fix aging infrastructure as it reduces the likelihood of redevelopment into another use.

Of course, it’s been a pretty regular political reality to talk about things and never do them, so we’ll see if any of this actually happens. 

The Abbotsford News: Chilliwack man speaks up for seniors as mobile-home park eyed for redevelopment

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A Chilliwack resident is urging city hall to consider the plight of senior owners in Fraser Village Mobile Home Park who may soon be forced to sell their manufactured homes and move.

Terry Hanson said he and fellow park residents learned about redevelopment plans for the park across from Townsend Park after reps of Westbow Group held a meeting explaining their intent to build townhouses on the property.

Hanson estimates the market value of his trailer at about $225,000. But the reimbursement offer was only for $130,000.

The crux of this is that many of the long-time owners won’t be able to purchase a home elsewhere to replace the one...

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A Chilliwack resident is urging city hall to consider the plight of senior owners in Fraser Village Mobile Home Park who may soon be forced to sell their manufactured homes and move. Terry Hanson said he and fellow park residents learned about redevelopment plans for the park across from Townsend Park after reps of Westbow Group held a meeting explaining their intent to build townhouses on the property.

I should start selling T-shirts that say ASK ME HOW LOW LOT RENTS = REDEVELOPMENT. If I sold them to displaced residents only my sales would be in the thousands of units.

Business Research & Insights: How land lease homes are reducing the costs of retirement

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Could home ownership in retirement be more affordable? Under the increasingly popular land lease model, the answer is a resounding yes.

In a land lease community (LLC), residents own their home but lease the land it sits on, paying a regular rent to the community’s developer to occupy the site. Without the land component, homes can be 30 to 40 per cent cheaper than if they were a freehold property in the same location.

For the vast cohort of Australians over 50 the main appeal is a lower cost of entry. This can free up significant cash that could be used to fund a more enjoyable retirement.

“When people sell the family home and move into...

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In a land lease community (LLC), residents own their home but lease the land it sits on, paying a regular rent to the community’s developer to occupy the site. Without the land component, homes can be 30 to 40 per cent cheaper than if they were a freehold property in the same location.

Looks like Australian journalists may have more common sense than their American counterparts, because this is an article from “down under” and they “get” the fact that people choose to live in land-lease communities because they’re cheaper and not in hopes of home appreciation. But don’t tell the assistant professor from the earlier article because she’d call this “manipulation and exploitation”. You can imagine what Crocodile Dundee would then call her…

Fort Worth Report: Fort Worth mobile home nightmares eclipse the dream of homeownership for some

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Mayra Leyva and her husband knew they wanted to move into their own house one day.

However, her husband’s $30,000 annual income from his server job and Leyva’s inability to work because of her disability meant the couple could not qualify financially to buy one. 

So, in 2018, they decided to buy a mobile home instead. The Leyvas purchased a $37,000 used mobile home and started renovating it — new windows and floors, new lighting, new bathroom and bedroom. By the time they finished, the house’s value increased to over $60,000, Leyva said.

“It was worth it,” Leyva said. “We really put our efforts into that house.” 

Eventually, they landed in...

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For some, the purchase of a mobile home offers a low-cost alternative to homeownership. But in many cases, mobile homes lead to exploitation, said Hannah Lebovits, an assistant professor of public affairs and planning at the University of Texas at Arlington. “That specific space in the U.S. creates a lot of opportunities for manipulation and exploitation because we don’t really see that class of people as having power,” Lebovits said. “In fact, we see them as very disempowered and disadvantaged, and that creates opportunities to further marginalize them through systems of exploitation. It’s similar almost if we think about the dollar store model, to where we have these dollar stores popping up in communities that don’t have full grocery stores,” Lebovits said. “And the theory is, well, it’s cheaper because it’s a dollar store, but actually, the per unit cost for most items at a dollar store is significantly higher than at regular grocery stores.Unlike brick-and-mortar homes, mobile homes do not accumulate value over time and create wealth for the owner. The owner is not building equity, Lebovits said. It’s the opposite. The second you purchase that home, you are diminishing the value of the home. The second you begin to live in the home, you’re diminishing the value of the home, which is, again, that economic exploitation,” she said. 

Who wouldn’t expect a woke assistant professor at UTA to declare that mobile home parks are all about “manipulation and exploitation”. Let’s break her arguments down into bite-sized pieces of idiocy to easily refute them. So here goes:

People live in mobile home parks because it’s inexpensive. Yes, mobile homes do not appreciate like single-family homes. Residents are not living in mobile home parks because they are banking on appreciation. What motivated them is that they’re paying around $500 per month for a 3/2 when the surrounding stick-built homes cost $400,000 on average. If they can afford the $400,000 – and look at housing as an investment with huge returns in the form of higher future values – then they should definitely buy that. Nobody is standing in their way. But for most Americans today, $400,000 is a little out of their budget. I guess you could say the same thing about cars. If you bought a $250,000 Ferrari, it might appreciate in value over the years. But if you bought a $25,000 KIA it would only decline in value. So if you can afford a Ferrari – and owning a car is your idea of a smart investment – then that’s what you should do. Definitely. But if your goal is affordable transportation the KIA is the right choice.

Yes, mobile home park owners hold all the cards as far as future land use. It’s their land. Because the residents don’t own the land they pay a fraction of the price of competing housing. If the resident can afford to pay $400,000, they should definitely buy a house that comes with land and that solves the problem. They could also buy an acre way out in the country and place their mobile home on that. Land ownership used to be the American dream, but inflation has made it unattainable. Buying a mobile home, without the land, is attainable. Mobile home park owners are what give residents this affordable option.

Yes, the quality of the products at Dollar Stores is mostly lower than the full-price alternative. But the difference is that everything only costs a dollar vs. $5 or $10 for the same basic commodity somewhere else. They sell the $1 dog bowl at Hermes for $500 if you prefer that. People shop at the Dollar Store because that’s what they can afford, not because they think it’s the place to go to get the highest quality goods.

SO HERE’S THE BIG CONCLUSION: IT’S NOT “MANIPULATION AND EXPLOITATION” BUT A FINANCIAL CHOICE OF THE CONSUMER AS TO HOW MUCH TO SPEND. One of the great things about America is that competition leads to a number of choices and price points, all with good and bad attributes for the consumer to decide. But it’s personal accountability once you make your decision.

I recently flew on Delta and they have three classes of seating options: 1) First-class 2) Plus and 3) Coach. First-class costs three times more than coach. Plus costs two times more than coach. Coach is the cheapest and has very little legroom. If I choose Coach then it’s a decision I make to save money, and I can’t go to the airline later complaining that they used “manipulation and exploitation” to make me buy it. That’s a foundation of the woke initiative – that everyone is a weak and must be watched over. Not buying it.

Hannah Lebovitz is an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Arlington. Not to be mean, but that’s a pretty lowly rated institution. Here’s what U.S. News and World Report says about it: The University of Texas at Arlington's ranking in the 2024 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities, #236. Its in-state tuition and fees are $11,728;  So I guess you could kind of compare UTA to the Dollar Store of colleges, right? Do the students go there out of “manipulation and exploitation”? Apparently, based on her arguments.

Realtor: 5 Manufactured Homes Priced Below $300K That Will Surprise You With Their Luxe Style

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With rising housing prices and interest rates sky-high, buyers are on the hunt for alternatives.

We’ve shown you tiny houses, we’ve shown you floating homes, and this week we’ll show you manufactured homes, some of them with luxuries that will amaze you. Best of all? They also have prices that might surprise you.

And these aren’t tired old tin cans in a trailer park. These manufactured homes offer style and substance for less.

The five we’ve found have all been recently renovated and serve as proof that you can score a comfy, chic bargain—if you know where to look.

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Look at the photos then look at the prices. What idiot would pay that much? In Missouri we’d call that “bad shopping”.

Marin Independent Journal: Novato poised to update mobile home rent-control law

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The Novato City Council is moving forward with a plan to revise its rent-control ordinance governing mobile home parks.

The changes under consideration would cap annual rent increases on mobile home spaces at the consumer price index (CPI) or 4%, whichever is lower. Other revisions of the law would make it easier for park owners to recoup expenditures on beneficial capital improvements.

The council introduced a version of the ordinance for a first reading at its May 7 meeting. The reading was postponed until the council’s June meeting, however, after the sponsor, the Los Robles Mobile Home Park, requested minor changes.

The Los Robles...

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The Novato City Council is moving forward with a plan to revise its rent-control ordinance governing mobile home parks. The changes under consideration would cap annual rent increases on mobile home spaces at the consumer price index (CPI) or 4%, whichever is lower.

Why not call this by its true name: “Redevelopment Insurance”. How can you explain the concept that park owners should not be able to raise their prices more than 4% if inflation is 9%? You can’t. And with the passage of this ordinance, I would imagine that there will be no mobile home parks in Novato within a few years WHICH IS EXACTLY WHAT THE CITY LEADERS ARE HOPING FOR.

KTVO: Hard deadline set for major step in Kirksville housing project

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KIRKSVILLE, Mo. — A new ultimatum has been set regarding one of Kirksville’s most anticipated projects.

At a special city council meeting last week, the council agreed to a hard date proposed by Donnie O'Haver, the owner of the mobile home park located at 909 West Gardner Street.

O'haver will now have until June 10, 2024, to remove the trailers and debris from the property.

After the city originally purchased the property back in October of 2023, O'Haver was originally given until the end of December to clear the property, but after very little progress had been made, that deadline was pushed back until the end of April.

But due to things...

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The city is partnering with Kirksville R-III School District and is planning to use the property to build four tiny homes.

So the city is tearing down a massive mobile home park in order to build only 4 tiny homes? I love the fact that – since a city owns the park and they are demolishing it – there is zero push back from the media on all the families being evicted. This makes me think we need to add to my earlier equation:

LOW LOT RENTS = REDEVELOPMENT = HAPPY CITY GOVERNMENT

Is that REALLY what rent control is all about? Wouldn’t shock me.

American Press: Rezoning request for mobile home park near Iowa rejected

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Jeff Davis Parish police jurors on Wednesday rejected a request to rezone property on Gro Racca Road near Iowa for a mobile home park, a development residents in the area opposed.  The Police Jury unanimously denied a request from Country View REI, LLC to rezone 60 acres located just west of U.S. 165 from agriculture to commercial.  Developer Nicholas Toti told the board that the development is an opportunity for the parish to have a mobile home park that is different from the others.

“We’re looking at providing a mobile home park with double or triple the normal lot sizes with restrictions on materials, usage, out buildings and years of...

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Shocker! Gee, never saw that one coming – NOT. When will people learn that the “moat” to our industry is a permanent thing as cities don’t want new mobile home parks and the citizens back that hatred. I talked to a guy that draws engineering plans for zoning variance applications for new parks recently and asked “so how many of these designs have been actually built so far?” and he answered “none”.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: THINKING THAT PEOPLE WANT NEW MOBILE HOME PARKS IN THEIR CITY BECAUSE THEY 100% DON’T.

Lookout: After residents told to move their mobile homes for Coastal Rail Trail, some mull legal action

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Karen Anderson has lived in the Castle Mobile Home Estates park along 38th Avenue in Live Oak for more than 30 years. She expected to stay there for the rest of her life. 

However, in January, Anderson received a notice from the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission that her mobile home encroaches on land where the RTC plans to build the Coastal Rail Trail and, eventually, run a passenger train. She will have to pick up her home and move it by June 2025 or, the RTC said, the agency has the right to move it for her.

“This is my retirement, and where else am I gonna go in Santa Cruz County? Because my family’s here,” Anderson...

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However, in January, Anderson received a notice from the Santa Cruz County Regional Transportation Commission that her mobile home encroaches on land where the RTC plans to build the Coastal Rail Trail and, eventually, run a passenger train. She will have to pick up her home and move it by June 2025 or, the RTC said, the agency has the right to move it for her.

Have people completely lost track of the concept of progress? Clearly, more people will benefit from the rail line than those few tenants who have mobile homes that back up to the tracks. That’s how progress works. Every time a rundown block of downtown is renovated, the old residents are displaced. There’s no other way it can be accomplished. And, as usual, the residents want to play the victim and sue to shut the development down or use that concept as extortion to get more money – and the woke media revel in giving them that opportunity.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: REFUSING TO ACKNOWLEDGE THAT PROGRESS REQUIRES SACRIFICE FOR THE GOOD OF THE MAJORITY.

The Berkshire Edge: West Stockbridge mobile-home park tenants score following the West Stockbridge Rent Control Board’s negligible rent increase

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West Stockbridge — Tenants of the Residences on Mill Pond mobile-home park at 40 Albany Road in West Stockbridge can now breathe a sigh of relief following the town’s Rent Control Board decision on May 8 that upped their monthly fees by less than $2.

For the past two months, the West Stockbridge Select Board has convened as the town’s Rent Control Board in accordance with its governance. The subject of the three meetings, including two public hearings, has been a Petition for Rent Adjustment, a proposed rate hike that would have tripled the rent for tenants from $241 per month currently to $797.51 per month.

The proposal wasn’t novel for...

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Tenants of the Residences on Mill Pond mobile-home park at 40 Albany Road in West Stockbridge can now breathe a sigh of relief following the town’s Rent Control Board decision on May 8 that upped their monthly fees by less than $2.

Here’s a message to the West Stockbridge Rent Control Board: “when the owner tears the park down and displaces all 35 residents, you morons are directly responsible”. What idiot would think that another year of Bidenomics yielded only $2 of additional expenses for the park owner? Inflation is running closer to 10% than 1%. If the new attitude of the Rent Control Board is that rents can no longer provide decent rates of return on mobile home park investing, then there won’t be any mobile home parks left in West Stockbridge a couple years from now. But was that their actual plan all along? Probably. And the tenants fell right into their trap.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: TENANTS THINKING THAT BUREAUCRATS HAVE THEIR BEST INTERESTS AT HEART

FOX 17: Mobile home owners demanding better safety regulations following tornado damage

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PORTAGE, Mich. — Residents in the Pavilion Estates mobile home park near Portage returned to the scene of Tuesday night's storms, some picking up the few remaining pieces of their life as they search for a new place to live.

Kalamazoo County Sheriff Richard Fuller reported late Tuesday night 176 homes or properties in Pavilion Township were damaged, 15-17 of which were completely destroyed. Up to 20 people were injured, but miraculously, no one lost their life.

According to the National Weather Service, mobile homes that are not appropriately tied down are vulnerable to 50 mile-per-hour winds. Tuesday night's twister was measured as an...

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A few years ago there was a booth at the MHI show in Vegas that sold a storm shelter that goes under the mobile home deck for around $10,000. And now there’s one from Home Depot that’s around $4,000.

Anyone would know that a successful storm shelter is going to require close proximity to your home, like your basement. People are not going to run in the wind, rain and hail to a shelter 400 yards away in the mobile home park. But they will walk 5’ out of their home when they feel the tornado is near. That’s why mobile home park shelters are a stupid idea and these personal shelters are totally the answer. It is then up to the tenant whether or not they want to spend the money on it.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: THINKING THAT ANYONE WILL TRAVEL MORE THAN A FEW FEET OUTDOORS IN THE MIDDLE OF A GIANT STORM.

WTSP: Residents at manufactured home parks sound alarm over rising lot lease fees

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SAFETY HARBOR, Fla. — Owners of manufactured homes reached out to 10 Tampa Bay over a dramatic rise in the monthly cost of the lot lease prices.

The increase hits these homeowners especially hard because most people are paying a mortgage on the home on top of the monthly lease they pay to the park for the land. A home is supposed to be an asset but for these homeowners, it's quickly becoming a burden. 

Sonia Hass and her husband live at Amber Glades in Safety Harbor but she doesn't know if they'll be able to keep affording the land beneath their home.

“The greed is just insane,” she says. “They have no concern for the people that...

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This year, park owners proposed a $100 increase to her nearly $900-a-month lot lease. Park owners can raise rates if they match the Consumer Price Index. Inflation has given license to raise lease prices as much as the market will bear. “Now people have to decide well, ‘do I take that off of my food?’” she says. “’Or do I take that off of my prescriptions?’”

Why is all this “attitude” focused only on mobile home park lot rents? Under Biden we have seen 30% increases in prices in three years. Gas is double and so are groceries. Why are those increases fine but mobile home park lot rent increases (at an actually lower percentage) are abhorrent? I’m sick and tired of this false narrative.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: PRETENDING THAT ANY TYPE OF COST IS DIFFERENT THAN ANY OTHER – IT’S ALL THE SAME WHEN YOU HAVE TO BALANCE YOUR BUDGET.

Lynwood Times: Lynnwood manufactured homeowners stuck with rising rents and nowhere to go

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Additionally, these homes were built prior to 1979 and are therefore prohibited to relocate due to an existing state law—at risk of irreparable structural damages. With many of the community’s residents being senior citizens living on a fixed income or low income, or both, increasing rents may force them to surrender their homes indefinitely and struggle to find a new place to live, even if that means the streets.

The average cost of a manufactured home in Washington state is approximately $135,000 according to manufacturedhomes.com. Most of Royalwood’s residents cashed in their pension to purchase their homes believing it would be an...

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“You can’t move the home, ‘mobile’ is a huge misnomer,”said Dickens. “That home is built, created, made to be placed in one spot and not moved and that becomes a real challenge for manufactured homeowners who are constantly facing economic eviction through the ever-increasing rents. ”Dickens often refers to manufactured homeowners as “prisoners in their own homes” because they do not have the ability to move and are constantly at the mercy of predatory landlords who “seem to want to nickel and dime them through various fees and charges and an ever-increasing rent.”

So let me get this straight. You can’t afford the cost of housing and the only solution is to jack your home up, re-attach the hitch, call a mover, and down the highway you go into the sunset? How about just putting it on the market and selling it like all home and condo owners do? If you move your mobile home the lot rent will all be about the same no matter where you go, and you will have wasted thousands of dollars in moving the home for no purpose. If you live in Washington you’d have to move the home several states over to find a cheaper place to live. Instead just sell the mobile home and move somewhere that you can actually afford, even if that means moving to an apartment in Kentucky.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: THINKING THAT MOBILE HOME PARK LOT RENTS ARE CHEAPER DOWN THE STREET BECAUSE THEY’RE NOT AND THAT MOVING A MOBILE HOME IS SMARTER THAN JUST SELLING IT.

Click Orlando: Rent for mobile home lots in Florida keeps increasing. Will new law help?

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ORMOND BEACH, Fla. – What was once a more affordable way of living is now in jeopardy.

Some mobile homeowners in Central Florida told News 6 that the amount they pay to rent their lots is increasing so much that it’s pricing them out of their homes and preventing them from selling them, too.

Since the pandemic, it seems the price of everything has increased, including what it costs to live in a mobile home in Florida.

The state legislature recently passed a measure that is supposed to give mobile homeowners more rights, but is it enough?

Debbie Powell says she has been trying to sell her home in The Falls at Ormond Beach Mobile Home Park...

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Stark says it does not cap lot rent increases, but it’s a start.“These people have had no voice, had no way to fight back a little bit if they thought the rate increases were extraordinary. So, this gives them that opportunity to mediate that,” Stark said.

For those who think that Florida is a “red” state, please read this article. Giving tenants the ability to force a costly mediation every time the rent goes up – without any legal limitations on rent increases – is just ridiculous. This will cost park owners a fortune in legal fees and for no purpose whatsoever. I have long written about the fact that Florida talks a “red” agenda but is as “blue” as can be when it comes to tenant law. Combined with the simple fact that it’s becoming impossible to obtain or retain insurance in Florida this latest law would suggest that the best years for park ownership there are over. Pretty embarrassing that Ron DeSantis signed this flawed legislation.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: EMPOWERING RESIDENTS TO THINK THEY HAVE POWER OVER RENTS WHEN THEY HAVE NONE.

Washington State Department of Commerce: Report: Lack of affordable housing options reaches critical levels in communities throughout Washington state

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Olympia, Washington – The lack of affordable housing options has reached critical levels in communities throughout Washington, according to the recently released Affordable Housing Advisory Board (AHAB) Five-Year Housing Advisory Plan. The AHAB report highlights the need for action, detailing that the state must add over a million new homes within the next 20 years to meet current need and accommodate population growth. This widely quoted estimate of housing needs was reported last year.

The Housing Advisory Plan emphasizes that nearly half of the new homes required in the coming decades must be affordable to households earning less than...

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If you google up rent control in Washington state, you’ll see the catalyst that drives woke writers crazy:

House Bill 2114 (HB 2114), otherwise known as rent control, that passed the Washington State House of Representatives February 13 on a party line vote, appears to have died in the Senate and failed to pass out of committee.

Look, I know the “free rent” advocates almost choked to death on their kale salad when it turned out that Washington state bureaucrats were not as woke as they hoped, but please give this issue a rest for a few years and then try again. Rent control is just not coming to Washington state at this point. Not even close. Sorry.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: REFUSING TO ACCEPT REALITY

KCRG: Iowa mobile home park closes storm shelter leaving residents with few options

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NEWTON, Iowa (WOI) - Jasper County has been hit with two tornadoes so far this year.

Both times, people in the Sunrise Terrace mobile home park in Newton have used a storm shelter to stay safe.

But now, management says the shelter is closing, leaving people with few options.

Residents have not been told why the storm shelter is closing, so many people are frustrated and concerned about the next round of severe weather.

 

According to Iowa Code in Newton, mobile home parks are required to provide storm shelter facilities.

Leaders with Jasper County Emergency Management say they just recently heard about the closure, and are working on a...

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Classic lie:

Trailers do give a unique issue when it comes to severe weather because they’re just not built to withstand even 70 mile an hour winds, we usually see those flip or start to come apart pretty easily.

Wow, somebody needs to get a hold of HUD because a mobile home going down the highway already has winds of 55 mph to start with and, if it’s going into a headwind of 30 mph, then it’s facing 85 mph winds and will apparently “come apart pretty easily”. I guess HUD needs to require mobile homes to be shipped only at 30 mph and on perfectly calm days!

The truth is that mobile homes are built perfectly fine and do about as well as stick-built homes in a tornado – they both get shredded. I live in the Missouri Ozarks and I have seen first-hand tornado damage and when a 200 mph wind hits a brick house it’s pulverized. Everything is.

COMMON SENSE MISTAKE: THINKING THAT ANYTHING CAN WITHSTAND A TORNADO – IT CAN’T.

The Guardian: ‘It’s like winning the lottery’: the mobile home owners buying the land they live on

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Bev Adrian, a retired career placement counselor for people with disabilities, lives in Woodlawn Terrace, a mobile home park just outside Minneapolis, Minnesota. The nearby streets are full of bustling local businesses – a Sota Boys Smoke Shop, a Pump N Munch Gas – but Woodlawn is a quiet park tucked away under maples and pines.

Adrian moved there four years ago, coincidentally right as Woodlawn’s owner was looking to sell. Woodlawn’s landlord was well liked, but for years the park’s residents had been hearing rumors about possible sales to much less friendly owners.

“People lived here in fear,” Adrian says, “because these places are...

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Ah, the Guardian. What a great publication – at least when it comes to losing money. These folks can’t help but lose more money year after year. Here’s the current results straight from Google:

The publisher told staff in a quarterly update, seen by Press Gazette, that it anticipated a cash outflow of approximately £39m in the 2023/24 financial year (which runs to the end of March), versus £17m in the previous year, due to the revenue decline and cost of investment in technology.Feb 12, 2024

Maybe the reason that nobody reads or advertises in the Guardian is that the reporters are very bad at what they do. Check out this example of such basic errors:

Mobile home parks, also known as trailer parks, are officially and more accurately called manufactured housing parks. Prefab homes are substantial constructions; once placed in a park, more than 80% of them are never moved.

The writer can’t even figure out the correct name of “manufactured housing community” and that the homes are anything but defined as “prefab”. Even scarier that person’s boss can’t even figure it out as I assume they at least attempt to fact check the stuff they print.

Later in the same article they take great offense at my statement from some past article or speech that “there’s a huge number of poor people and there’s more poor people, like, every day.” I’m not sure how that’s shocking since the U.S. government’s own stats confirm that “there are more poor people every day”. Here are the numbers, straight from Google: “The U.S. poverty rate saw its largest one-year increase in history in 2022 wth 12.4% of Americans now living in poverty. According to new 2022 data from the U.S. census, this is an increase from 7.4% in 2021.

The correct title for this article would be:

WRITERS WANTED: NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

Fredericksburg Free Press: Caroline trailer park residents feel like ‘yesterday’s trash’ after sudden eviction notices

Preview:

May was supposed to be a celebratory month for Tanya Rowan’s family as the fifth of her six children prepares to graduate from Caroline High School. 

The Rowan family was planning to host a graduation party at their trailer home in the Hill Mobile Home Park, situated between Team Carolina BBQ and the Bowling Green landfill off A.P. Hill Boulevard. 

But plans quickly changed for Rowan earlier this spring when she received an eviction notice. 

“My baby is about to graduate, but she burst into tears because I said we can’t afford [a gathering],” Rowan said. “They can’t enjoy anything right now because they don’t know if they’re going to have...

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Let’s cut through the B.S. and get right to the point:

She recently received notice from Virginia Housing that no waiting lists to use a Housing Choice Voucher are currently open. 

The failure of this woman to find housing -- despite being on disability with five kids -- falls on the failure of Federal and state government NOT ON THE MOBILE HOME PARK OWNER. All that’s going on here is that you’ve got a person that can’t find housing in normal society and will only be able to get shelter via a subsidy program which the government cannot afford to expand. Here’s what the correct title to this article should be:

GOVERNMENT FAILS MOBILE HOME PARK RESIDENT – WHY ARE WE SENDING BILLIONS OVERSEAS WHEN WE CAN’T EVEN PROVIDE HOUSING TO OUR OWN PEOPLE?

ABC12: Thetford Township mobile home park operating without a license

Preview:

THETFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (WJRT)- A Genesee County community wants action and answers, claiming they've dealt with poor conditions for too long.

ABC12 has learned the owners of the North Morris Estates Mobile Home Park in Thetford Township are operating without a license and are under investigation by the Michigan State Police.

"This is what it looks like on a good day," said longtime resident Theo Gantos as he held up a mason jar of brown water.

He said he and his wife have to filter and purify their water constantly.

That is when it even works.

According to Gantos, the community is a victim of frequent water outages.

"Residents have to...

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Our thoughts on this story:

So the new owner buys a dilapidated mobile home park and attempts to bring it back to life, and even provides a very accurate narrative of the project and the goals:

Since purchasing North Morris Estates MHC, we have renovated many homes, added new homes, removed all unsalvageable homes, are in the process of completing multiple major utility infrastructure repairs, and also catching up on years of other deferred maintenance inherited from previous ownership. We are working closely with all regulatory agencies to ensure the community is brought into and remains in compliance. We also have a strict entrance process to ensure all residents meet our guidelines, adhere to fair housing laws and will agree to be an important part of a quiet and enjoyable neighborhood. We are excited about the progress we are making and appreciate the positive feedback we have received. We look forward to continuing to work with the surrounding community to make North Morris Estates MHC a great place to live.

The new owner did not create the park’s current condition, instead they are the solution. Meanwhile the residents seemed determined to try and get back at the new owners for raising rents and demanding that rules be obeyed. The buyer is a well-known and well-respected park operator and the park looks very nice in the photos. Clearly, common sense would tell you that what’s really going on here is that the residents hope to gain an advantage by pretending that the park is in abhorrent condition and the state and city seem to be totally on-board with all of this manipulation. What the residents will soon find out is that the city is more than happy to get this park torn down and redeveloped into a nicer use and they have effectively given them the ammunition they always dreamed of to do so.

The correct title to this article would be:

FOOLISH PARK RESIDENTS DEMAND TO BE HOMELESS – AND THE CITY IS HAPPY TO OBLIGE

Jefferson Public Radio: California mobile home park residents face persistent PFAS water contamination

Preview:

Man-made chemicals known as PFAS, which stands for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are used to make a lot of modern products. They’ve also been linked to health impacts including cancer. Despite legislation, addressing PFAS contamination at small water systems remains a challenge in California.

Kimberlee has lived at the Friendly Acres Mobile Home Park in Red Bluff, California for over 30 years.

She has plenty of fond memories of this place, near a bend in the Sacramento River and surrounded by walnut and olive tree fields in Tehama County. Just behind the property is a ranch that’s home to the famous bucking bull Red Rock, who she...

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From the same folks that brought you Covid-mania comes the new item we should all fear: PFAS. I’ve never heard of it before, but I did find this first item on Google of interest:

The industrial use of PFAS – sometimes called “forever chemicals”, since they don't degrade in nature – has been so prevalent in the last decades that 99 percent of all humans, including fetuses, have measurable levels of PFAS in their bloodstreams.

If 99% of all Americans already have PFAS then exactly what are we worried about? I looked up Missouri and PFAS is not even regulated in my state nor do they believe it poses any health risk at all. So I guess the correct title would be:

WHY DOES ANYONE LIVE IN CALIFORNIA?

South Floride Sun Sentinel: Fort Lauderdale upgrade? 978-unit apartment complex could take place of old-time trailer park

Preview:

FORT LAUDERDALE — A mammoth apartment complex with enough units for nearly 1,000 families would bring new life to a forlorn property that served as one of Fort Lauderdale’s largest mobile home parks for nearly six decades.

The Pan American Estates trailer park, once home to more than 200 families, would be transformed by a new 25-acre development that calls for 10 buildings ranging from five to eight stories. The land at 150 NW 68th St. sits south of McNab Road and west of Andrews Avenue, several blocks north of Cypress Creek Road not far from the Pompano Beach border.

The 978-unit project would be completed in 2031 and developed in three...

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People always ask why I am able to predict the future with such accuracy. It’s simply because I try to employ common sense. I wrote about a decade ago that mobile home parks – in the absence of doubling or tripling lot rent – would all ultimately be bulldozed to make way for apartments. The reason is simple. You can stack apartments four or five high on the same ground space as one mobile home park lot. So here’s the reality of that prediction coming to fruition in Fort Lauderdale where one single 200 lot mobile home park can hold 978 new luxury apartments.

The correct title to this article should be:

LOW MOBILE HOME PARK LOT RENTS YIELD REDEVELOPMENT: IT’S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE

Erie News Now: Local Mobile Home Park Residents Return to State Capitol to Continue Fighting Against Rising Lot Fees

Preview:

Affording a home. For many people it's a life goal. What happens when you own your home but not the ground it sits on?

That's the reality of thousands of mobile home park residents in Pennsylvania. Two of them from Erie County made a third trip to Harrisburg this week, on their own dime. They are fighting a hike in lot fees.

Scenes like this exist all over Pennsylvania. This one in Erie County named Summit Heights, was purchased by the same owners who also now own Lexington Heights, in Erie County's Belle Valley Area.

Erie News Now has talked with residents at both parks who feel the out of town ownership and overall management is:...

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Three residents driving to the capitol is not exactly a groundswell of support. I could get three people to petition for virtually anything from demanding that the average work week be reduced to one day or that only chocolate be served as lunch at all public schools or even that cars should be outlawed and replaced by mules.

The correct title would be:

STATE LEGISLATORS TRY TO HUMOR THREE PEOPLE

Jacobin: Trailer Park Residents Are Forming Cooperatives

Preview:

Bev Adrian, a retired career placement counselor for people with disabilities, lives in Woodlawn Terrace, a mobile home park just outside Minneapolis, Minnesota. The nearby streets are full of bustling local commerce — a Sota Boys Smoke Shop, a Pump N Munch Gas — but Woodlawn is a quiet park tucked away under maples and pines. Adrian moved there four years ago, coincidentally right as Woodlawn’s owner was looking to sell. Woodlawn’s landlord was well liked, but for years Woodlawn’s residents had been hearing rumors about possible sales to much less friendly owners.

“People lived here in fear,” Adrian says, “because these places are just...

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Across the country, residents of mobile homes are organizing to buy and cooperatively run their communities, with government help, to protect themselves from landlords known for jacking up rents and neglecting infrastructure.

I respect that “all’s fair in love and war” but can we please remove the most ridiculous part of the above mantra of the “free rent” movement folks: “neglecting infrastructure”? That’s because professional landlords do anything BUT neglect infrastructure. On the contrary they are the ONLY ONES injecting the capital needed to bring old parks back to life. This is mandated under their loan covenants among other items, and I am yet to see a single example of this ever being the case.

I guess the problem is that the “free rent” movement people can’t come up with anything to complain about other than rents going up so they invented that false claim to have at least two points to complain about.

The correct title might be:

“FREE RENT” ADVOCATES DEMAND FREE RENT

However, that’s not really accurate, either. Because the stats prove that tenant-owned communities have rents that rise just as fast – or faster – than those of professionally owned ones. Additionally, the residents get lousy management and failing infrastructure when the tenants are at the controls. It’s all just a game of smoke and mirrors in which spotlight-seeking non-profits offer short-term subsidies that never last (just ask the city of Palo Alto which quietly shut down their resident-owned community after a few years) just to get 5 minutes of fame.

So the truthful headline would be:

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS FREE LUNCH OR FREE RENT