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Magic Valley: Buy or move: Jackpot residents worry over mobile home park plan

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Michael Walls has taken a liking to the small town of Jackpot, Nevada.

“We fell in love with this little community,” Walls said, after moving there two years ago with his wife.

The small, unincorporated community of mostly casino and hotel workers, sits on U.S. Highway 93 just south of the Idaho-Nevada border.

Walls provides security for Barton’s Club 93, and he said the employees at the casino and motel have bonded like family.

But now, with changes coming to the mobile home park he’s living in and limited housing options available, he said “we might be on our way out.”

Walls and many other Jackpot residents became concerned...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Here are the only four paragraphs of this story you need to get to the truth:

Walls and many other Jackpot residents became concerned after the new owner of the park more than quadrupled the monthly lot rent — from $75 to $401. Plus, the owner wants the tenants to purchase the mobile homes, instead of renting, for what many residents say are inflated prices.

“This has gotten blown way out of proportion,” Spence told the Times-News on Thursday. Instead of being the “scumbag” some people have made him out to be, he said wants to help Jackpot grow and clean up the mobile home parks, making them a better place to live.

His plan has not gone over well with many residents who have flooded social media with negative comments, saying the trailers are rundown and overpriced. They say Spence’s plan seems more likely to cause people, including longtime residents, to leave Jackpot rather than stay.

She is interested in purchasing the one-bedroom home, “but not for what he wants.” She worries that because there are few housing options in Jackpot, she might end up living in her vehicle, a Dodge Durango.

So the bottom line is that the park owner is trying to bring the property back to life and salvage one of the last bits of affordable housing in the area. Some of the residents (probably 10%) don’t appreciate this and want him to leave it nasty and cheap. Let the free market decide who is right.

Missoula Current: City Drains Housing Reserve To Help Residents Buy Mobile-Home Park

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(Missoula Current) The residents of a small trailer park moved closer this week to owning the land under their homes after members of the Missoula City Council agreed to dedicate funding from the Affordable Housing Trust Fund toward the effort, pending the outcome of a public hearing.

But the $181,000 allocation to convert the mobile home park, located in the Franklin to the Fort Neighborhood, to a community-owned residence effectively depletes the Trust Fund's reserve balance of all revenue.

Emily Harris-Shears, the city's housing policy specialist, said that while draining the reserve account may leave a new project unfunded, the money...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The city is spending about $70,000 per household to keep the rent lower by a few bucks? Read this quote from the artidle: “this amount will help keep the lot rents reasonable,” Harris-Shears said. “Residents will still experience an increase in their lot rent, but this stabilizes and reduces that impact.” So the rent will be no lower after the residents buy the park in all likelihood – possibly higher. Here’s a better idea: give each household $70,000 in cash and that will cover their lot rent – regardless of amount – for the next 15 years (if you include interest at 4% in a CD). What a bunch of idiots!

WSBT: Hollywood Mobile Home Park tenants seek assistance amid shutdown

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ST. JOSEPH COUNTY, Ind. (WSBT) — Time is ticking for the people living at a St. Joseph County mobile home park to vacate their homes.

Hollywood Mobile Home Park is being cleared away to be prepped for sale.

Residents tell WSBT they have become so desperate, they turned to the mayor.

During last week's "Meet the Mayor" event, a couple of them went hoping to get help.

The mobile home park is not within city limits, so there was not much Mayor Mueller could offer.

Indiana State code requires mobile home park owners to give 180-days’ notice before closing the property.

t does not specify financial assistance to help with move out.

The 41...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This article would sober any sane person up to the reality that – instead of publicly shaming higher lot rents – the residents and media need to be pressing owners to actually RAISE rents to fend off re-development. The writer seems shocked that the park is shutting down for redevelopment when there is no current buyer for the land, but then they inadvertently give the reason in the article when they state “lot rent is about $300 a month at Hollywood. The average rent in the county is $1100 according to Rent Cafe.” How much would the rent have had to be for the park to remain open? That’s the important question here.

Cleveland 19: Euclid Beach Park Mobile Home Park residents speak out against their displacement

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CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - Residents of Euclid Beach Mobile Home Park will be meeting this afternoon to voice their displeasure over the Neighborhood plan The Western Reserve Land Conservancy (WRLC) announced Thursday that they will be displacing the residents and turn the land into green space as part of the Cleveland Metroparks System

Over 100 people will have their homes lose their homes.

The mobile home park sits on the site of the former iconic amusement park Euclid Beach Park, will become part of the city’s park system with hopes that it will be managed by the Cleveland Metroparks.

This comes after an extensive land-use study and...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Yeah, right – they “need this land for the city park system”. That’s the oldest con in the book. I saw the same thing in Springfield, Missouri in the early 2000s when a park suddenly was shut down to make way for a city park. Great excuse for condemnation and all the city has to do is erect a swing set and a picnic table.

WVVA: Mobile home park residents continue to struggle, face new hurdles in 2023

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PRINCETON, W.Va. (WVVA) - Mobile home park residents across Mercer County, W.Va. said Thursday they’re facing increased pressure to vacate their homes. Three different residents WVVA spoke with said they received the exact same notice on Wednesday -- adding requirements from managerial approval to sell one’s home, to requirements surrounding lawn care, pet ownership, home alterations and much more. Those new requirements all came following a near-doubling of lot rents in at least five mobile home parks in the county, all of which those we spoke with Thursday currently reside in.

Residents WVVA spoke with said such requirements had never...

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Our thoughts on this story:

“They basically want to try to make it so expensive to live here that it’s pointless,” said a Gardner Estates Mobile Home Park resident who wished to remain anonymous. “That’s why people choose to live in trailers most of the time. It’s lower income families.” OK, that’s not true at all. The owners are raising the rents as part of bringing the parks back to life and getting up to market rent levels, and if a current resident can’t pay the fair price they need to get out of the way for those who can. Mobile home parks are NOT meant to be all about “lower income families” they are simply affordable housing and a ton of middle-class Americans live in them (including some upper class in coastal parks). Don’t define mobile home parks as simply “low income” – that’s the bastion of Section 8 apartments and NOT mobile home parks. Articles like this are insulting to people who live in parks and help to perpetuate the false stigma.

Lansing State Journal: East Lansing seniors can stay in manufactured home community, for now

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EAST LANSING — Four months ago, 77-year-old Lois Hagy thought she might have to leave her home after 20 years.

Last March she and more than a dozen residents who live in manufactured homes in The Reserve at Falcon Pointe received a letter stating they had to move because the property owner, FP Investors, LLC, was changing the land use to a single-family condominium site.

So the residents, who own their homes but not the property they sit on, were told they had to move by March 11, 2023, or the company would evict them.

“We were supposed to be out of here,” Hagy said.

The company has since had a change of heart.

It communicated its new...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’ve never seen this property and I’m just guessing, but is anyone fooled by this story? The owner is more than likely going to build the condos on the vacant land so they can break the development into two phases because of the higher interest rate on the debt to build it. Once the condos are full they will tear the park down and build out the rest. The fact that the writer thinks this is a moral victory is affirmation that journalism schools must not have any business course requirements. The land is infinitely more valuable as condos than as a trailer park – and anyone with basic common sense knows this.

KTTC: Olmsted County, City of Rochester address safety concerns at Bob’s Trailer Park

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ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) – Olmsted County Public Health began working with the City of Rochester over two years ago in an effort to address ongoing public health and safety concerns at Bob’s Trailer Park.

According to the city, the goal of this collaboration has been focused on creating a safe and healthy environment and bringing the park into compliance with applicable Minnesota laws, administrative rules, and City ordinances and codes.

Olmsted County Housing has worked with impacted individuals to find alternative housing and has shared information on housing resources since December 20, 2022. It continues to work with the City of...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, let me get this straight. The park owner files to shut the park down because it’s old and falling apart and the rent is too low to justify bringing it back to life. Then, to be nice, he lets people keep living there because they can’t find anywhere else as cheap. And then they sue him to make him let them live there for free for an eternity. Here’s the classic line from this story “several park residents also commenced tenant’s rights proceedings in court seeking to compel the park owner to restore plumbed water service to park units and abate their rent because of the lack of water service”. It reminds me of the time when Brad Pitt built people homes in New Orleans after Katrina to be nice and they then turned around and sued him claiming their free houses were bad quality.

WQAD 8: Residents at Wilton trailer park outraged over rent increases

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WILTON, Iowa — Dozens of residents at South Towne Mobile Home Park in Wilton, Iowa have had enough after their rent has gone up 54% the past eight months. 

They are outraged at the new management company, Kodiak Property Management, based out of Detroit. They took over about a year ago, and since then residents have not felt at home.

"It was $250 a month rent when I bought the trailer and moved in thinking that I would be able to save money to eventually have a down payment to purchase my own home. And instead, the rent is now $385," said resident Phyllis Wood.

Residents joined together to meet with area lawmakers at a community...

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Our thoughts on this story:

How dare the park owner raise the rent from $250 to $385 per month? The write of this article would make you think this was the biggest news story since FTX. But then there’s the little problem that even in Wilton, Iowa the average home costs $166,600 and the average apartment is $1,246 per month. That kind of ruins the story, right? Good thing the writer didn’t bother to give even the most remote facts about housing costs in the city. Nice job.

The News Tribune: The 42 families at a closing mobile home park in Puyallup have moved. Here’s what’s next Read more at: https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/community/puyallup-herald/ph-news/article271931147.html#storylink=cpy

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A Puyallup mobile home park that housed 42 families now sits empty. The few remaining families moved out of Meridian Mobile Estates on Jan. 31, city spokesperson Eric Johnson wrote in an email. One family was finishing moving their belongings the following day. Demolition is expected sometime this spring. The mobile home park at 202 27th Ave. SE had 15 families who hadn’t yet moved in early December, and they had until Jan. 31 to relocate.

Timberlane Partners bought the property the mobile home park sits on for $6.5 million in 2021. The developer plans to build 230 apartments there. “At this point, it is still very early in the process,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Down go the mobile home parks and up go the apartment complexes. And why not? They get three times more rent and you can stack them three high on a lot. The best quote from this article was “former resident Martin Martinez said his family moved out of Meridian Estates in November. They found a home to rent and still live in town. The rent they pay is about three times more than their $800 rent at the mobile home park, he said”. How can the media publish articles like this and then publicly shame park owners for raising rents in the next one. Surely people aren’t this stupid.

Multi-Housing News: Are Manufactured Homes a Good Investment in 2023?

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The manufactured housing industry has been on an upward trajectory in the past decade. Drawn by the strong and stable income manufactured homes communities, an increasing number of institutional investors and owner-operators have been diving into the segment. And during periods of economic uncertainty, this asset type is very resilient because it provides a much-needed affordable housing option.

“Mobile home parks are historically a recession-proof asset due to the shortage of affordable housing across the country,” Kevan Enger, partner & manufactured housing director at Capstone Cos., told Multi-Housing News. “It does well in good times...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Of course they are. Is this writer any good? Unfortunately not.

APG Southern Minnesota: Rice County pushes to protect its 'last affordable housing'

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Rice County commissioners warily took the first steps toward what they say will be a long process to protect the residents in its "last affordable housing" against "bad corporate players."

Commissioners are mulling an ordinance that would require mobile-home communities to give notice if the property is going up for sale and give resident associations the first opportunity to buy the community. Rice County would be the first to enact such requirements, prompting concern from some commissioners over whether it would be legal. 

"I kept reading these articles about other states and these hedge funds and giant corporations buying up these...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I have to admit I was excited to read this article, thinking it would provide some smart ideas on saving mobile home parks from the wrecking ball. Instead it was a worn-out piece on the concept of residents buying their own park. As somebody who has sold parks to the residents several times, let me tell you how it really works: 1) it takes a really long time 2) a huge number of the residents who try fail 3) the rents go up just as much anyway 4) only about 1 park per month pulls it off in the entire nation. Give it up, bureaucratic fools. Instead focus on things like giving park owners a pat on the back, give them grants for infrastructure repair, and tell idiots who propose laws like this to stuff it.

Lookout Santa Cruz: Storm damage at Soquel mobile home park unearths decades-old county plan to remove it from flood plain

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Alongside his mother, aunt, brother and neighbors, Alexis Ortiz lifted shovelful after shovelful of muck from his driveway. It was a gray mid-January afternoon and the first day of real respite from the series of destructive atmospheric rivers that swept through the region earlier in the month.

Twenty-nine years old with short black hair, a stocky build and a countenance softened by exhaustion, Ortiz moved slowly as he stepped away from his muddy driveway and into his muddy living room, brushing past the red notice from the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office declaring the structure unsafe to inhabit.

The bleak scene inside offered few...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Only in California would you spend $100 million to build a bridge that serves two smaller mobile home parks. And then find out that you still have to tear one of them down. Here’s a memo to California politicians: you’re nuts. They could have bought everybody in these parks a nice brick house in Sacramento – for cash and debt free – plus given them each two debt-free new cars and a $100,000 trust fund and still come out ahead financially. Do these stories of bureaucratic waste drive anyone else nuts?

The Gazette: Former Mount Vernon mobile home park manager accused of derecho fraud

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A former manager of a mobile home park in Mount Vernon is facing charges of theft and fraud after police say he lied to his employer about damages in the 2020 derecho.

Antonio Govea, 44, of Mount Vernon, is charged with ongoing criminal conduct, first-degree theft, money laundering, first-degree fraudulent practice and two counts of forgery.

Govea was employed as the park manager of Colonial Estates Mobile Home Park at 1225 First Ave. NW, Mount Vernon, between July 1, 2020, and May 15, 2022, according to a criminal complaint.

After the derecho, Govea told Birch Realty, the company that owns the park, that certain mobile homes there had...

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Our thoughts on this story:

That’s a very common scam that some park managers engage in: tell the owner the homes are vacant and then rent them and pocket the rent. To guard against this you need to constantly audit your vacant homes with such tools as simply “facetiming” the manager and having them walk into the supposedly vacant homes and prove their vacant. If they refuse then you know that they’re cheating.

KSL: As Riverdale trailer park closure approaches, some residents left with big fees and few options

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RIVERDALE — Jason Williams has lived at Lesley's Mobile Home Park in Riverdale for about 22 years. On May 31, however, the park will no longer exist.

City officials rezoned the park for development last summer, Williams said, and residents were given a nine-month notice to move out. Park management offered some financial assistance — $3,000 for those who moved out by the end of January — but Williams said that amount doesn't nearly cover the cost of moving a trailer to a new park. His own costs have been around $11,000 to move his trailer just 12 miles, he said.

Williams said 50-plus families will have nowhere to go come the end of May....

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Our thoughts on this story:

I wish more groups – such as MHAction and all U.S. media outlets – would take note of articles like this in which relates to the reality of what happens when a mobile home park gets redeveloped into a different use. In this case, most of the residents live in pre-1970 mobile homes which means they have no HUD seal and can’t be moved. So basically the people will have to abandon their homes and start from scratch. This is the byproduct of low rents which make other uses more economically attractive.

Summit Daily: West Acres Mobile Home Park residents in Steamboat Springs face 50% increase in lot rent

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STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — Residents at West Acres Mobile Home Park on the west side of Steamboat Springs are facing a nearly 50% increase in lot rent that is set to take effect April 1.

A letter posted on the doors of homes in the park was two sentences. The first said rent was increasing and the second announced the base new rate of $1,032 a month for most of the park’s units.

For most residents currently paying closer to $690 a month, the increase translates to nearly $350 more each month for the ground they rent beneath the mobile homes they own.

“People that live in West Acres are the workforce of our community,” said Irene Avitia, who...

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Our thoughts on this story:

$1,032 per month seems like a really high mobile home park lot rent until you go to Bestplaces and see that a single-family home in Steamboat Springs is $805,700 and the average apartment rent is $1,903 per month. So that means that even at the new rent, those folks living in the mobile home park are paying at least 50% less than everybody else in town for housing. Perhaps the bigger story is that people who choose to live in a city as expensive as Steamboat Springs with very little income are making a conscious decision and will be clearly sacrificing housing options in pursuit of scenery, etc.

WFLA News Channel 8: St. Pete mobile home community makes progress in fight against rent increase

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TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) — 8 On Your Side is helping a local mobile home community fight an unexpected rent and tax increase, cutting through the red tape and showing them a path to challenging the double whammy.

8 On Your Side talked to residents at the Sunshine Mobile Home Park in St. Petersburg who say the latest rent like has them feeling devastated.

“It usually matches the social security increase each year, close to that, but this time it’s almost three times as much,” Donna Pettaway said.

According to a notice from the park’s owner, residents will also be charged $957 for the ad valorem tax and $42 for the non-ad valorem tax.

“Most...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Real smart. This media outlet declares “8 On Your Side is helping a local mobile home community fight an unexpected rent and tax increase, cutting through the red tape and showing them a path to challenging the double whammy”. OK, I’ll make a $10 bet that this park is torn down and redeveloped within a few years. Why would the owners bother with the hassle when they can just tear it down and build a Home Depot or an apartment complex? When residents finally realize that publicly shaming park owners results in parks being torn down they will then realize that the media is simply helping them become homeless. Want to have your park torn down? Apparently just call “8 On Your Side” and let them start the process for you.

APG Southern Minnesota: Mobile home rehabilitation project seeks support

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Christmas weekend four Rice County families experienced emergencies related to frozen water pipes, one of which ended up bursting. Fortunately, the Mobile Home Rehabilitation Project (MHRP) assisted the families in identifying and arranging for repairs, as well as coordinating with insurance to cover the costs.

Without access to the MHRP, these families may have been without water and ultimately without housing during the holidays.

The MHRP serves mobile home residents who live within the boundaries of the Faribault or Northfield school districts and are from low-income households, and it prioritizes families with young...

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Our thoughts on this story:

FINALLY A GOOD ARTICLE! I am in complete support of any mobile home weatherization project. I have seen first hand how bad mobile homes are at holding heat and there are so many easy fixes that can save residents a fortune in utility bills such as covering windows with plastic, caulking windows, weather strip doors and thermal switchplates. This writer deserves a gold star.

ABC 10: Weeks after floods, Acampo area mobile home park residents struggle with recovery

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Where streets once looked more like rivers in Acampo, life has returned to parts of San Joaquin County evacuated during January's winter storms.

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Our thoughts on this story:

Parks flood if they are in a floodplain. So do houses, apartments, duplexes, retail centers, hotels – everything else that sits on top of land. Why is this of interest to anybody?

NBC 5: $25M in federal funds headed to mobile home parks across Vermont

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RATTLEBORO, Vt. —

The Vermont Agency of Natural Resources is hoping to improve water infrastructure in manufactured housing communities, also known as mobile home parks.

“We are taking advantage of unprecedented federal funding to work with manufactured housing communities across the state to make those kinds of investments in drinking water, wastewater and drainage infrastructure,” said Julie Moore, Agency of Natural resources secretary.

The agency’s Healthy Homes Program has almost $25 million in federal money available from the American Rescue Plan to fix water infrastructure issues in mobile home parks.

“We haven't had a lot of...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Finally a story that makes sense and is a win/win. The state is going to help park owners fix their failing infrastructure so that parks remain parks and residents have a higher quality of life. These are the ideas that really fix the American affordable housing crisis, and help prevent properties from redevelopment. Single family subdivisions have long benefited from these type of efforts, so why not the “high density” form of detached housing?

AZMIRROR: Bipartisan bill to help mobile home park residents advances

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As mobile homes continue to be displaced by development, a bipartisan bill aims to increase funding to a program to provide relief to those impacted. 

Mobile homes have been vanishing across the Valley most often being replaced by luxury apartments or similar developments. The Phoenix City Council earlier this year approved $300,000 for legal services for three mobile home parks facing similar issues but advocates have said it hasn’t been enough. 

The proposed legislation would increase the allotments dispersed by the Mobile Home Relocation Fund by more than 60% for some cases. It also increases the amount the landlord must pay to the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s what this story is really about expressed in one quote :“the proposed legislation would increase the allotments dispersed by the Mobile Home Relocation Fund by more than 60% for some cases. It also increases the amount the landlord must pay to the fund for each tenant filing for relocation assistance”. Now I’m all for helping people move homes from the 1990s to new, but what happens with these programs is that the parks that are most prone to redevelopment are also the oldest and contain a ton of homes from the 1960s. 1970s and 1980s. These homes are not really transportable and the cost to move them is more than they’re worth. They need to put age requirements on these type of laws and the older homes should be a small cash payout based on value. Spending $50,000 to move a 1965 home – like they do in California – is blatantly stupid.

The Oregonian: Readers respond: Meet housing target with manufactured homes

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I commend Gov. Tina Kotek’s bold vision in dealing with our current housing emergency, (“Kotek homebuilding target is ambitious, potentially costly and politically fraught, experts say,” Jan. 29). I would suggest that we don’t ignore Oregon’s strong manufactured home industry as one pathway for getting more homes built quickly and affordably.

Modern factory-built homes are manufactured to high standards. They can be built and installed much more quickly than a site-built home. A loosening of zoning restrictions that say where they can be located would go a long way toward meeting the governor’s housing goal and would provide good jobs...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The writer hit on a big point that few realize: a typical mobile home factory can build 7 mobile homes per day. Compare that to a single-family home subdivision. If you are trying to build housing fast, mobile homes are the best way to go. That’s why the government bought 500,000 mobile homes in WWII – it was because they could get housing fast. The only issue with this article is the emphasis on “mobile homes”. I think the future of the industry – when trying to solve the affordable housing crisis – is to focus on modular and tiny homes and 3-d printing and everything BUT mobile homes which most people have a terrible stigma against.

WSBT: Residents speak out against mobile home park shutdown

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SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WSBT) — A mobile home park shutdown is causing its 41 families to scramble to pack up and move.

The management tells them it is due to mounting maintenance expenses.

People living at Hollywood Mobile Home Park have 180 days to move out.

Those WSBT spoke with say they are not getting any move-out assistance and have to pay rent, all while trying to save up for a new place.

Homeowners at the trailer park want answers to the “blindsiding” news.

Some have lived there since the 60s.

In the eviction letter, sent out this week, it says ongoing infrastructure issues have forced the park to shut down.

Residents say otherwise.

"If...

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Our thoughts on this story:

A 41-space mobile home park is shutting down. And it’s the narrative the media fears most. Here’s the key line from the article: “in the eviction letter, sent out this week, it says ongoing infrastructure issues have forced the park to shut down”. That translates to low rents make it economically unfeasible to rebuild the infrastructure. So the media won with their public shaming odyssey with this owner. They talked the owner into redeveloping the land into a more profitable use rather than face the wrath of tenants complaining about higher rents and the media trumpeting that. The media cannot handle the fact that the park owner – if you complain enough – can elect just to raze the property and end the harassment.

Aspen Public Radio: Future of Glenwood’s Three Mile Mobile Home Park up in the air

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The future is uncertain for the residents of Three Mile Mobile Home Park in Glenwood Springs.

Social-justice nonprofit Manaus has been working to secure financing and purchase the park for $2.4 million so they can sell it back to the residents under a relaxed timetable, but a volatile real estate market has made for a difficult process. (Aspen Public Radio received a $5,000 grant from Manaus in 2022.)

Many residents in the park own their units but pay a fee to rent the land underneath.

To purchase the park as a resident-owned community, Three Mile residents are entitled under the Mobile Home Park Act to 120 days to secure loans, make an...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Let me get this straight – you’re going to buy a 20-space mobile home park for $2.4 million to make it a resident-owned community. That’s $120,000 per resident. The people in the mobile home park have limited funds. Why wouldn’t it be smarter to move them to a much lower-cost state and buy them a nice brick house for $120,000 in cash, and tell them “OK, you’re set for life and all you have to do is earn enough to cover utilities, taxes, insurance and food. They could then get a job anywhere at minimum wage and have a great life. When I read these articles it always makes me wonder if the writers and non-profits have ever ventured to states like Louisiana where you can buy a nice brick house all day long for $100,000 or so. You can see them on Realtor.com. Why would you be spending huge money to keep people living in a state they can no longer apparently afford?

Southeast Iowa Union: Fairfield council wants to see improvements at manufactured home park

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FAIRFIELD — The Fairfield City Council approved a conditional permit for Leisure Living Estates during its meeting Monday, but has asked the owner of the trailer park to clean up several nuisances in the next three months.

Leisure Living Estates is a trailer park, or manufactured home park, on the west edge of Fairfield that is owned by Don Davis of rural Mt. Pleasant. In March 2022, Fairfield City Administrator Aaron Kooiker sent a letter to Davis indicating that the city had received complaints about the lots at Davis’s trailer park.

“On the majority of these lots, you will see dilapidated trailer homes, some of which do not even appear...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’ve never seen this park and have no idea who’s telling the truth, but it always seems odd when the city complains about the condition of the mobile homes when the park is 100% owner-occupied with zero park-owned homes. I’m not sure that people understand that park owners own the land and the tenants own the homes. As a result, how is this guy responsible for the condition of them? Why is the city not giving citations to the residents instead?

Scripps News: Facing rising rents, mobile home park residents are buying their land

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A walk can be a good time to reflect on a journey.

On a stroll through the Durango, Colorado, mobile home park she moved to when she was 13, Alejandra Chavez stops at the unit her parents owned.

“They bought it for $3,000,” she says.

Chavez moved to southern Colorado from Mexico to live with her parents, who worked multiple jobs to make ends meet.

“The American dream is hard,” she says.

Chavez says it can be hard to find affordable housing in Durango. The average home goes for more than $700,000, according to Zillow.

For many, a mobile home is one of the few affordable options when looking for a place to live.

“We work in restaurants,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Are you seeing a repetitive theme this week? In this article, the writer admits that “it can be hard to find affordable housing in Durango. The average home goes for more than $700,000, according to Zillow”. So if prices are that high, wouldn’t it be better to help pay to relocate these residents to a lesser-expensive metro? Surely they can’t be happy barely getting buy on the extreme prices of everything that goes with living in a $700,000 neighborhood, such as $10 hamburgers. If ROC was buying these parks for $20,000 a space, then you’d say “there’s no other options at that price” but when the lots cost more than a single-family homes a couple states away you have to question what the real point to any of this is? Personally, if I was one of these residents I’d rather have the debt-free nice brick home in Kansas.