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NBC Palm Springs: Meeting to Discuss Relocation Grants for Oasis Mobile Home Park Residents

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(CNS) – A community meeting will be held Wednesday evening to provide an update on the troubled Oasis Mobile Home Park, with Riverside County housing staff giving an overview of a program that would provide about 150 relocation grants of up to $100,000 for eligible households.

The meeting, which will be the fifth hosted by Riverside County’s housing division since September 2022, will be held at 5:30 p.m. at Oasis Elementary School, 88-175 74th Ave., according to Riverside County Supervisor V. Manuel Perez.

According to Perez’s office, the relocation program is expected help about 150 families have more flexible options and to move...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Where does California get all this money? Who in the world would give $100,000 per household to all 150+ of the residents in this mobile home park to help pay for their relocation. Not sure if anyone in California has ever been east of the Rockies but you can buy a really nice house in Missouri for $100,000 and have no mortgage or lot rent. Wouldn’t it be smarter just to give each of these families $100,000 in cash and an airplane ticket to Kansas City?

The Hill: What’s holding back manufactured homes?

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The term “manufactured housing” often comes with negative connotations: poorly maintained homes, sub-par quality, and aesthetically unappealing. This unfavorable stereotyping belies the fact that today’s HUD Code manufactured homes are not unlike the ugly duckling flourishing to a refined adulthood. Before the Code’s adoption in 1976, what were then called “mobile homes” were built to lower standards for strength, durability, and efficiency. This saddles modern manufactured homes with a poor reputation inherited from their predecessors, when in fact they offer more diverse configurations and higher-quality housing options. If Congress and...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you want to expand mobile home sales, this is the wrong way to do it:

“As the regulator of interstate commerce and state restrictions, Congress can preempt unreasonable constraints on interstate commerce like New Jersey’s requirement that manufactured homes only go in designated “parks.” Congress can also use its spending power to encourage states or local governments to allow fair competition between HUD Code and site-built homes. As the building code regulator, HUD can enable more novel designs and other innovations to allow greater flexibility in home design that blurs the distinction between manufactured and site-built homes.”

You can’t cram mobile homes down the throats of the population by force. You have to do it by making them actually like the way they look and want to live in one. Until that is achieved you will never see mobile home manufacturing even remotely approximate the 400,000+ units sold per year in the old days.

ABC Action News: Florida mobile home park bans security cameras for residents

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RUSKIN, Fla. — A Hillsborough County woman said the owners of her mobile home park forced her to take down her security cameras within seven days, claiming she was breaking the law.

But the ABC Action News I-Team has learned where and how you can use security cameras is not always clear in Florida.

“I had a camera right here,” said Joni Evans, who lives in the Captain’s Landing Mobile Home Park in Ruskin. “And there was another camera right here.”

Evans said she bought the cameras more than six years ago after someone burglarized her tool shed, painting a racial slur and cutting down her pride flag.

“It had my wife just thoroughly upset....

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is the craziest article of the week. A resident installs no less than 10 security cameras because without them “she doesn’t feel safe”. Then the park owner requires them to be removed because they are an invasion of privacy and against Florida law. Then the resident says that the park owner has ruined her life and the park owner offers the classic response: “I don’t think I would believe her because she’s vengeful and hateful and mean”. It’s a shame that Jerry Springer has died because that would be a great episode.

NOLA.com: Requiem for a mobile home: The Schriever Trailer’s sudden fame and swift demise

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The journey from eyesore to internet fame can be fleeting. And fatal.

Just ask the crumbling mobile home that for a couple of weeks sat on the side of a Terrebonne Parish road after the trailer carrying it away broke down. Because it was falling apart, the mobile home was pushed to the side of the road in Schriever, where it was left, blue tarps flapping in the wind.

The humble abode, however, was on the cusp of a social media stardom. A Thibodaux resident grew tired of seeing the dilapidated structure on West Park Avenue day after day.

“We would pass and say, ‘That’s hideous,’” said the man, who wishes to remain anonymous.

So he...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This article is pretty funny – I would recommend reading it.

Daily Mail: Inside couple's stunning $495,000 bargain home built in a factory and trucked to a ritzy Malibu trailer park where their neighbors paid more than $5 million to live

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A couple scored a bargain home for less than $500,000 in Malibu where their neighbors are spending up to an eyewatering $5million for the same views of the Pacific. 

Emily Mills, 46, and her partner Barclay Neel, 48, purchased the luxury mobile home from Dvele in 2019 for $495,000 and had it trucked to the ritzy Point Dume Club mobile trailer park. 

The three-bedroom, 2.5-bath home is as eye-catching as any of the luxurious homes littering the Malibu coastline, but the couple paid less than a fifth of the median home price in the area. 

Within Malibu's zip code, home prices hover around $5million, leaving the glamorous coastal stretch...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you consider that home “stunning” then you either have poor eyesight or have been looking at the tiny home shows for too long on HGTV. Only in California would someone pay $495,000 for that thing. In Missouri you’d be lucky to get $49,500 for it on the banks of the Lake of the Ozarks.

Mahomet Daily: Kodiak still waiting on many Candlewood residents to sign lease

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As of April 27, only 58 of the 521 residents at Candlewood Mobile Home Park in Mahomet had signed a lease from Kodiak Property Management, LLC.

For Candlewood residents, the problem appears to be threefold: some residents have not received a lease agreement from the management group; others have received different drafts of the agreement over the last month; then, for others, the terms and conditions within the lease are troublesome.

For Kodiak, its plate has been full with working on the necessary requirements for the mobile home park to pass the Illinois Public Health Department inspection on May 3. Passing the inspection would give...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And the winner of Dumbest Quote of the Week goes to this MHAction member:

“The general trend is for owners to increase rent and decrease maintenance to maximize profits,” Patrick McHugh with MHAction said. “Many residents are evicted or self-evict, allowing owners to rent out the property at a higher value.”

Why is this dumb? Two reasons: 

  1. I do not know of a single park owner who has a goal of increasing rent and decreasing maintenance. When you buy a park, you have loan covenants requiring the property to be kept at a high standard. Most park buyers inject large amounts of capital to bring failing infrastructure back to life. The current playbook is also to add and/or improve amenities to make higher rents equal higher value in lifestyle. None of this is consistent with “decreasing maintenance”. Increasing rent is a given when you buy and improve a park – nobody would argue with that.

  2. If the argument is that the lot rent is too high (which is what this article is all about) then how can the “owners rent the property out at a higher value”. I know that some would like America to be socialist by economic system, but in a capitalist system of competition, if the rent was too high there would be no takers. You can’t have it both ways. So MHAction is admitting that the new lot rent is, in fact, not too high. And that defeats the entire theme of the article.

The Northern Light: East Blaine residents voice opposition to city council on manufactured home parks

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About 40 east Blaine residents let Blaine City Council know they opposed a proposed change to the city code that would allow large manufactured home parks in east Blaine.
The residents packed into overflow seats at the start of the April 24 city council meeting at city hall. One by one, just over 20 residents took to the podium and spoke for over an hour during public comment period. Concerns were raised on a variety of topics, including potential lack of affordability and landownership, loss of city property tax revenue and watershed impacts.
Last year, the developers of East Harbor Hills requested a zoning text amendment to city code that...

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Our thoughts on this story:

It’s absolute fact that a single-family home next to a mobile home park sells for about a third less than one that is not next to a mobile home park. Just look at Zillow. As a result, nobody wants a mobile home park built next to their residence. They’re not idiots. This is one of those situations where if the mayor or city council owned a home next to the proposed mobile home park, they would shoot it down in two seconds. I absolutely hate hypocrisy (“rules for thee but not for me”) and the bureaucrats in East Blaine should be ashamed of themselves for even floating this hypocritical idea and terrorizing these single-family homeowners with their nonsense.

WTXL: Mobile home owners lawyer-up to stop steep rent increases

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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) — At least 30 Tallahassee mobile home owners have sought legal assistance after hundreds of dollars in lot rent hikes from new landlords at Lake Bradford Mobile Home Park.

"We can't start over," homeowner Catheryn Smith said through tears, as she and neighbors at Lake Bradford Mobile Home Park are having to consider major life changes due to the increase. "I moved here in 1994, which is almost 30 years," she said.

New owners took over the park in Aprill of last year and, Smith says, began sending notices about the increasing rent. "Every time you get a notice , it's threatening eviction as the end result," said...

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Our thoughts on this story:

So a bunch of tenants at Lake Bradford Mobile Home Park go out and hire an attorney to sue the owner over raising rents which, in fact, is completely legal. Their attorney says, it's a battle worth fighting for. "They (the owners of the park) should have to answer to somebody. They should treat these people with more respect, more dignity, more concern, more compassion." But wait, you can’t sue somebody over those things, right?

Maybe these tenants haven’t been reading these weekly news reviews I write. That’s a shame, as you can clearly see that filing absurd lawsuits and attempting to restrict rents is the normal recipe which results in parks being demolished for better uses. It’s a common theme week after week. Park owners are not going to sit there and be bullied, they will strike back with a “land for sale” sign and the lease termination letters go out shortly thereafter.

Monroe Journal: Temporary housing assistance approved for Mississippi

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MADISON – FEMA has approved the State of Mississippi’s request for Direct Temporary Housing Assistance for Carroll, Humphreys, Monroe, Panola, Sharkey and Montgomery counties.

This assistance was authorized because of limited temporary housing for survivors of the March storms.

Working with Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, FEMA will provide recreational vehicles (RVs), mobile homes (manufactured housing units/MHUs) and leased homes for eligible applicants in the six counties.

MEMA and FEMA will work with local jurisdictions to ensure that units are placed in accordance with all state and local zoning and permitting...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is what the U.S. government uses as a safety valve when there are major storms and homes lost. Mobile home parks are actually beneficiaries of these storms as they are the “go-to” spot for FEMA. This is why most mobile home park owners do not fear major weather events.

The Daily Record: Wooster council considers zoning changes affecting manufactured home districts

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WOOSTER − City Council is considering two pieces of legislation that would change how the city uses R-5 zones — manufactured home districts that allow for mobile home parks.

The first would revive standards for manufactured homes in R-5 districts while the second would grant the city more authority to enforce maintenance codes in those districts.

Manufactured housing:Wooster council OKs expansion of manufactured homes in existing mobile home parks

Both pieces of legislation come three months after council voted to allow for the expansion of the prefabricated dwellings within R-5 zones.

The city previously banned such expansions in 2018...

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Our thoughts on this story:

While this article title sounds like Wooster is opening the door to new mobile home parks, it only makes it possible to allow for new zoning for mobile home parks (which is probably never going to happen) coupled with the ability to “establish regulations that include minimum density, setbacks, parking, open space and basic health and safety needs.” So basically you might be able to build a mobile home park with a 100’ front and rear setback, a density of one unit per 10 acres, and parking for 100 cars per lot – pretty much whatever the city ultimately decides. This is the oldest trick in the P.R. book. You talk about how much you respect the need for affordable housing and mobile home parks and then set parameters that make it actually impossible to build one. Let’s see what Wooster’s final requirements are and how many tracts they allow to be turned into a mobile home park. I’m not holding my breath.

Denverite: These Westwood residents need to raise $11.5 million to buy their mobile home park, or risk displacement

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When 95-year-old Josephine Sullivan first moved into Capitol City Mobile Home Park in Westwood in 1955, monthly rent was around $30, she recalls. Full of vacant lots, the park was a work in progress; Sullivan and her husband helped pour concrete and build out the area themselves. Over the decades they raised two kids in the park and watched the city grow up around them.

Today, monthly rent at the park costs $800, and it’s going up to $850 in June. The days of empty lots and pouring concrete are gone. Sullivan now lives alone in that same unit she bought in the 1950s; her daughter, now in her 70s, lives in a unit nearby.

The Loya family...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is one of the most common themes of these weekly article reviews: the false notion that the residents have the ability to buy their own mobile home park and that it works out well for them. The truth is that only an incredibly tiny fraction of these attempts ever succeed in closing on the property, and even then the rents go up just about the same – or even higher – than they would under corporate ownership. It’s kind of like someone who can’t afford to buy a plane ticket suddenly thinking they can get some mystical non-profit to buy them a Gulfstream jet instead. It’s a false narrative and giving people this bad idea is as crazy as the British thinking that King Arthur was hiding in the woods to save them when the Germans were about to invade England in WWII. Read what happened on the first attempt by the tenants to buy the park:

“The initial nonprofits working on securing investment funding pulled out, after the discovery that fire code regulations and overcrowding could lead to the park losing up to 40 homes in future years, making it a hard sell for investors.”

Do you seriously expect the second attempt to do any better?

I don’t know who is calling these woke journalists and spreading this nonsense (although I have my suspicions) but all they are doing with articles like this is to spread false hope and to disappoint people.

The Daily Iowan: Residents struggle with rent increases and maintenance in Havenpark Communities mobile home parks

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When Don Lund moved into Golfview Mobile Home Court in North Liberty in 1980, lot rent was $87 — $334 if adjusted for inflation today. After Havenpark Communities purchased Golfview in 2019, he paid over $400.

Lund said the rent gradually increased to $285 before Havenpark bought it, after which he said he came home to find a notice on his door that said Golfview was under new management and that rent would increase to $450.

Lund received another notice on his door that the rent would be increased to $506 on December 15, 2022.

Those rising rents follow the nationwide trend.

According to Statista, the average monthly rent for manufactured...

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Our thoughts on this story:

North Liberty, Iowa’s stats are $265,100 on a single-family home and $1,870 per month on a three-bedroom apartment. And this article is trying to publicly shame Havenpark for charging a whopping $506 per month in lot rent. WTF. Every single tenant in this mobile home park should send Havenpark a thank-you note monthly for giving them a nice place to live for 70% to 90% less than all other housing options. And instead a few residents want to whine about the rent going up $100 per month from even more ridiculously low levels and make up some goofy story that the park suddenly now has lesser maintenance than it did under mom and pop (yeah, sure). Articles like this are disgusting in their inaccuracy and lack of journalistic merit. I will be delighted when AI puts all these woke “journalists” out of work who can then learn new skills like driving for Grubhub.

Fox 4: Charlotte County neighborhood says they feel left behind

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More than seven months after Hurricane Ian smashed into southwest Florida, one Charlotte County neighborhood is still in shambles.

At the Holiday Estates Mobile Home Park in Englewood you’ll find devastation on every street. Many neighbors have moved away, and others are living in campers on their property while trying to rebuild.

The heavy winds ripped off the roof of Paul Mayer’s manufactured home.

“Everything! Furniture, everything in there was destroyed,” said Mayer.

Mayer bought a new manufactured home, but he says it can’t be delivered.

“They can’t deliver it until they get a permit. They say they can’t get a permit. The permit...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you live in coastal Florida you know that you have a good shot of having your property destroyed in a hurricane. It happens nearly every year. Yet people think that somehow the government and insurance companies should subsidize their desire to live in that risky environment. It’s all coming to an end now that insurance companies are refusing to write policies in Florida or are doubling and tripling rates on those lucky enough to find a carrier. You can either stay in Florida and pay higher rates (if you can even find insurance) or leave, but it’s a choice you make. If you bet wrong and your home gets destroyed and you either have no insurance or are underinsured, that’s the gamble that you took and you need to accept that and stop trying to blame others.

Roanoke Times: Judge hears appeal in trailer park water cutoff case

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CHRISTIANSBURG — A judge on Wednesday voiced some skepticism toward allegations the owner of the Massie’s Mobile Home Park showed willful negligence with the bills when a utilities provider shut off water to the property in November.

Montgomery County Circuit Judge Robert Turk heard arguments Wednesday in an appeal of the case dismissed earlier this year by a lower court.

Turk told the attorneys that he’ll return with a ruling in about two weeks. The judge, however, pushed back against some of arguments from Southwest Virginia Legal Aid, saying several times that the issues raised by an attorney with the Christiansburg-based...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is the most annoying article of the week. A free legal aid attorney is suing, on behalf of the residents, the owner of a mobile home park because the water was shut off for a few hours due to a billing mistake with the water department, claiming it caused them serious harm and mental anguish. Even the judge in this case is annoyed with the tenants:

“Turk told the attorneys that he’ll return with a ruling in about two weeks. The judge, however, pushed back against some of arguments from Southwest Virginia Legal Aid, saying several times that the issues raised by an attorney with the Christiansburg-based organization didn’t seem to constitute willful acts. “There’s got to be an end to the game,” Turk said near the end of the hearing.”

The water department apparently shut the water off because of a bill that the former owner didn’t pay – not the new owner who had just closed on the property. When the new owner was told the water was off, they ran down and paid the bill they were not even responsible to pay to get it restored. The new owner bent over backwards to help the tenants and this is the thanks they received.

It’s stories like these that explain why many old moms and pops simply shut their parks down (like the second article above) rather than let them remain open and have to deal with unreasonable residents like those that filed the suit.

Fresh Water: The fate of Euclid Beach Motor Home Park

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When Western Reserve Land Conservancy (WRLC) in December 2021 purchased the 28.5-acre Euclid Beach Mobile Home Park on North Collinwood’s Lake Erie shoreline, WRLC senior vice president and director of thriving communities Matt Zone assured the approximately 139 residents with 150 mobile homes on the property that the purchase was made to save the property from a Dallas-based developer who planned to build high-rise apartments.

Zone and Cleveland ward 8 councilperson Mike Polensek assured the residents that the next steps would focus on brainstorming sessions to figure out how the land could best serve the residents and the larger...

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Our thoughts on this story:

You better bring a shovel when you read this article, as I’ve never seen so much B.S.  The bottom line is that nobody wants a mobile home park built in 1895 for carnival workers (no joke) to hold back progress. It’s not about any deep theories on housing equity but simply the city’s lack of desire to have a “trailer park” with failing infrastructure taking up valuable lake frontage that can now be redeveloped into something nice and new and attractive. You can sugar coat this narrative in 1,000 words (as this article does) but it doesn’t change anything.

The Islander: Pines residents await park sale in limbo

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Pines Trailer Park residents are holding out hope that a buyer might keep the property for mobile homes.

Residents failed in a drive to purchase the park, 103 Church Ave., Bradenton Beach.

The owner partnership, with Richard and William Jackson as officers, listed the 2.78-acre park for sale at $16 million in January but the price rose to at least $16.5 million.

By law, the partnership first had to offer the park to the resident owners.

Now the owners are entertaining offers from prospective buyers, a process operating under a veil of nondisclosure.

Bill Gorman, an agent representing the Pines Homeowners Association, would not disclose...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s the most essential quote from this article:

“Homeowners formed a cooperative after the park partnership announced its intent to sell the land leased by residents. Although Gorman and the HOA worked to negotiate the purchase of the park, their efforts proved unsuccessful. “I think everything had to do with the fact that the community itself is an incredible location and the owner could demand a higher price than the worth of a normal mobile home park and the lenders were reluctant to make a loan on that basis,” Gorman said in an April 27 interview with The Islander.”

The truth that nobody wants to hear is that you could easily make the park worth the $16.5 million if you simply raised the lot rents significantly. By having the owner keep rents low it signed the death warrant for this property in all likelihood. As I’ve been saying for over a decade, if you don’t push rents to market levels the land always gets redeveloped for a more profitable use. It’s called basic economics.

The Moberly Monitor Index: Mobile home park closes; residents scramble

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MOBERLY — Residents of Sarbaum Mobile Home Park at 1502 S. Morley are packing their belongings and looking for drivers to move their trailers.

In a letter dated April 10, the trailer park’s owner and manager, Michael Baker, told residents that he’s closing the park in August due to financial difficulties. Some tenants have consistently paid their rent over the years, but others have fallen behind. Baker can no longer meet operating expenses, the letter says.

Baker has covered shortfalls out of his own pocket, he said, but can no longer do so. In addition, the sewer system is over 60 years old and requires frequent, expensive repairs....

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Our thoughts on this story:

This quote from the article explains why the best thing that can happen to any mobile home park is to be purchased by a new buyer with the capital to bring it back to life, the professional management to collect the money and keep it as a running business, and higher rents to make it all worthwhile and keep it from the wrecking ball:

“In a letter dated April 10, the trailer park’s owner and manager, Michael Baker, told residents that he’s closing the park in August due to financial difficulties. Some tenants have consistently paid their rent over the years, but others have fallen behind. Baker can no longer meet operating expenses, the letter says. Baker has covered shortfalls out of his own pocket, he said, but can no longer do so. In addition, the sewer system is over 60 years old and requires frequent, expensive repairs.”

Auto Evolution: The Millennial Tiny House Proves You Can Still Live in Luxury When Downsizing

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Downsizing and tiny living started gaining ground in the early 2000s amid increasing environmental concerns. We've seen an uptick in popularity for tiny and mobile homes over the past few years, no doubt fueled by the worsening housing and economic crisis. Put simply, forced to cut down expenses and carbon footprints, people are looking at alternative housing solutions.

They include tiny houses – mobile homes that sit on trailers and can be towed from location to location, promising freedom to travel while working and, most importantly, an existence free of debt and stress. With the rising popularity of tiny living, we've seen a wider...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’m sorry but you can’t add the word “luxurious” to tiny home living. That’s like adding “whip cream” to a bologna sandwich – they just don’t go together.

KUSI News: New state laws could impact Imperial Beach trailer park evictions

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SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Residents at Miramar Imperial Beach Mobile Home & RV Park are forced to leave every six months for a period before they can return to their vacated spot.

A new California law could impact how short-term trailer parks such as this one operate, preventing them from forcing people out twice a year.

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Our thoughts on this story:

Before you even think about buying a mobile home park in California I urge you to check out all the laws the state has passed to take away property owners’ rights https://mhphoa.com/mrl/html#CC-798-80. You better be buying a deal with amazing economics to warrant getting involved in this bureaucratic mess of a state.

Voice of San Diego: Proposed Mobile Home Protections Roll On

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Assemblyman David Alvarez’s proposed protections for RV owners passed its first legislative hurdle with unanimous support.

The bill comes out of the Miramar Imperial Beach Mobile Home and RV Park, where residents, as Jesse Marx reported last summer, have been forced to move in and out every six months before legal rights kick in. An earlier version of the bill only applied to Imperial Beach and National City but now applies to all mobile home parks throughout the state. 

The Imperial Beach park owners have said the move out policy is necessary to make repairs on site, but Alvarez framed it as an unfair business practice that’s going to...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The park owners, in this case, have the residents move out every six months so they can keep the option of developing the property at any time without having a huge legal battle with the tenants. Now that California has passed this new law, I would look for all of these properties to shut down immediately as soon as the current lease expires. In essence, in their attempt to circumvent traditional property rights, the bureaucrats have actually accelerated the homelessness of these residents. Pretty much proves out that the scariest soundbyte in America is “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”. That is always the path to doom.

Source NM: The federal government accidentally burned down their houses, then made it hard to come home

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The wildfire had already burned 160 square miles of northern New Mexico forest last spring when it suddenly surged ahead, reducing to ash the cozy cabin David Martinez had built for himself more than two decades earlier.

Martinez, now 64, had fled days before, one of 15,000 people ordered to leave as the fire spread.

He spent the next three months sleeping near the edge of the fire in his pickup truck, his physical and mental health declining from the smoke, stress and lack of sleep. 

Desperate for shelter, he spent $5,000 or so of the emergency aid he’d received from the Federal Emergency Management Agency on a down payment for a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Wow. This makes commercial air travel look good.

WCAX: Scott administration ‘looking into’ mobile home parks for homeless

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MONTPELIER, Vt. (WCAX) - State leaders are exploring options for homeless Vermonters who may lose their emergency housing this summer.

With no more federal funding available to pay for emergency hotel rooms, the proposed state budget includes funding until the end of June, when the eligibility criteria will change. Housing advocates are worried about a looming wave of people being kicked out on the street.

Lawmakers in the House Humans Services Committee earlier in the session floated a plan to house Vermonters in vacant mobile homes and Governor Phil Scott says the idea has merit.

“There are a number of lots in some of the mobile home...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Good thing there are very few mobile home parks in Vermont so there are fewer nice people to torture with idiotic ideas like this.  State leaders are clearly insane if they think it’s fair to stuff reputable mobile home parks with homeless people. Has nobody followed the California success in this arena?

AL: Baldwin County mobile home park owner continues fight for RV spots

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Recreational vehicles are a common feature in mobile home parks in Baldwin County, despite not being allowed under the county subdivision regulations.

That’s the argument that Steve Huffaker, who owns Pine Grove Estates, a mobile home park outside of Bay Minette, is making. Huffaker has had his park for 30 years and decided that he wanted to add a few spots for recreational vehicles in his park, for construction workers hired to work on the new Novelis aluminum recycling and rolling plant being built in the area.

“With the new aluminum plant coming in, I wanted to create RV spots for people to park their RVs,” Huffaker said. “These aren’t...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Mobile homes and RVs were one and the same until about 1976 with the establishment of the HUD seal. About 90% of all mobile home parks were built prior to 1976 and are grandfathered. So I seriously doubt that cities really have the right to restrict putting an RV on a lot. Most park owners are good-natured and don’t press this potentially false policy, but the demand for long-term RV spaces is growing and this is going to be a much bigger issue going forward. Probably time for some case law to bring this issue to an end.

Daily Breeze: Carson OKs overlay district to protect mobile home parks, residents

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Carson will create a mobile home park overlay district, adding an extra layer of protection to preserve what some residents have called their last bastion of affordable housing options.

The City Council approved the overlay district this week.

Essentially, only mobile home parks will be allowed in that district. If property owners within that area want to redevelop a piece of land on which a mobile home park sits, they will have to apply for and receive a zoning change from the city, and provide a comparable number of affordable housing units for the residents there.

There are currently 21 mobile home parks in Carson. They “constitute a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Carson OKs overlay district to protect mobile home parks, residents

The Orange County Registe: OC mobile home residents, who looked to legislature for rent relief, will have to wait

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Mobile home renters who were watching legislation in  meant to enact some  will have to continue waiting before they see relief — at least coming from the statehouse.

From Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi, D-Torrance, is  from increasing more than 3% plus the percentage of change in cost of living, or 5% annually, whichever is lower. It would not preempt any local ordinance that may offer even stronger protections for renters, Muratsuchi said.

The idea behind the bill is to protect lower-income and seniors on fixed incomes from losing their mobile homes as rents across...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Do you ever wonder why only landlords have rent control in California, and not everybody else? Fuel prices double, food triples, but only landlords get criticized and punished for the impact of inflation. In a capitalist country, it seems odd that price controls would only be applied to one finite portion of the economy.