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Digital Journal: Mobile Homes Market Projected To Garner Significant Revenues By 2031

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Market Research, INC. has recently published a report on Mobile Homes market which is an essential tool for businesses to gather critical insights about their target markets, competitors, and industry trends. With the increasing complexity of the global business environment, companies need accurate and up-to-date information to make informed decisions and stay ahead of the competition. That’s why we are excited to announce the release of our latest market research report, which provides comprehensive insights into the industry.

Our report is a comprehensive study of the industry, covering a range of topics from market size, growth...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Since there are no mobile home parks in most of these countries, can somebody please explain …

Mobile Homes Market Regional Analysis:

The research study covers North America, Latin America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Middle East and Africa on the basis of productivity, thus focusing on the leading countries from the global regions. Our report also provides a deep dive into the consumer behavior and preferences, which can help businesses understand their target audience better.

Did AI write this? Better proof it in the future.

10 WBNS: As of late Wednesday evening, the park manager tells us they are working to restore water but according to Barber, the water is still not back on. We will update this story as we learn more.

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ORIENT, Ohio — At least two homes in a mobile home community flipped due to powerful storms that moved through central Ohio on Monday.

The Pleasant Township Fire Department said multiple agencies were called to the Fox Lair Trailer Park on Goosehollow Circle around 4:30 p.m., just as the storms were moving through the area.

The fire department said two homes flipped and people were trapped inside. Everyone was safely taken out of the homes, but some residents suffered minor injuries, according to the sheriff's office.

The sheriff's office said a tornado hit the community, but that will need to be confirmed by the National Weather...

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Our thoughts on this story:

For getting hit by a tornado, these two homes did pretty well.

RVTravel: RV park tenants evicted after court ruling

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News and Analysis

San Rafael R.V. Park moves to evict tenants in wake of Ninth Circuit Court decision

Nearly all residents of the R.V. Park of San Rafael, in California, received eviction notices in early February after the property owner, K&M Family Trust, lost a rent battle in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Donna L. Chessen, trustee of the K&M Family Trust, argued that the City of San Rafael misapplied its Mobilehome Rent Stabilization Ordinance (“MRSO”) to her property, the R.V. Park of San Rafael, representing an illegal “taking.” A three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit disagreed.

The court ruled that San Rafael’s MRSO...

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Our thoughts on this story:

When pushed as to why the park owners shut the park down after the city and residents united to sue to block the rent from being increased, the owner gave the quote of the week: “the park has been operating at a loss for several years and has been fighting to keep this park open so no resident will have to move. The reality is the land is worth much more than operating an RV Park for affordable housing.”

When will people learn that low rents = park redevelopment? Apparently never.

The Spokesman-Review: Residents of Cheney mobile home park feel threatened by proposed rezoning

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The Cheney City Council will introduce a zoning ordinance on Tuesday night that will put residents of the North Cheney Mobile Home Park in the crosshairs.

The ordinance would rezone a lot located off State Highway 904 for mixed-use development, worrying some residents at the mobile home park that it’s just the first step before they are ultimately evicted.

“I don’t want to live in a tent in Spokane,” said Douglas Brunell, a 73-year-old resident and Air Force veteran who bought a mobile home in 2006 and has lived at the park for the past 17 years.

Plans for the property are “kind of to be determined,” said Clifton Trimble, land use planner...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Yet another State of Washington article designed to sway politicians that rent control for mobile home parks is a great idea (a clearly unified woke journalist effort). I hope the politicians actually read this one though, as the park is being torn down for a mixed use development since the rents are too low ($250 per month lot rent in Washington State – seriously?). You can’t have it both ways. Either you get higher rents or parks get torn down. Your choice, politicians of the State of Washington.

PR Newswire: ROOTS, DOORDASH AND LOCAL FOOD BANKS TEAM UP TO HELP MANUFACTURED HOUSING RESIDENTS IN NEED

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GILBERT, Ariz.Feb. 28, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Roots Management Group has partnered with DoorDash's Project DASH to deliver canned foods and dry goods to Roots residents in need in Arizona manufactured housing communities. Project DASH is DoorDash's initiative to empower food banks, food pantries, and social impact organizations to leverage DoorDash logistics to increase access in their communities. Since Project DASH was launched in 2018, it has powered over 3.5 million deliveries of an estimated more than 60 million meals in the U.S. and Canada.

Roots surveyed residents in seven of its Treehouse Communities to determine how best to meet...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Interesting idea but I’m a bit confused on the mechanics. Doordash charges a big fee for delivery and these people who need assistance have no money – so who is paying for this? The writer needed to give better specifics, but I’m all for new ideas if they actually help someone.

KHOU 11: Texas state park must close because landlord is selling the property to a developer

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After investing $72 million in improvements at Fairfield Lake State Park over three decades, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is losing its lease.

DALLAS — Fairfield Lake State Park, 96 miles south of Dallas, is expected to close permanently by the end of the month because its landlord is selling the land to a developer. 

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department received a lease termination notice from the owners of the 5,000-acre property. Vistra Corp. is selling the land to  Dallas-based real estate developer Shawn Todd and his firm, Todd Interests, for $110.5 million.

Todd announced the land will be turned into an exclusive...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Kind of funny to see the shoe on the other foot. The State of Texas leased this guy’s land for 50 years and when the lease ended he decided to sell it for $110 million to a developer. Maybe Texas should have paid a higher lease amount? Sounds kind of like the typical mobile home park article these days, right?

Marin Independent Journal: Dick Spotswood: Fight to keep San Rafael mobile home park residents in place is just beginning

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The first rule in affordable housing is don’t lose what already exists. That backward step may soon happen in San Rafael, displacing low-income residents at 40 residences, unless the city acts decisively.

In a column last year, I suggested that an overlooked source of affordable rentals are mobile homes. There is no need for expensive construction. Traditionally, most park residents own their not-so-mobile structures, which are inexpensively customized for long-term living. All that’s needed is a concrete pad with drainage, water availability and electricity.

A recent incident at one Marin mobile home park is suddenly a hot topic. The...

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Our thoughts on this story:

You gotta love the audacity of California bureaucrats. This is a terribly rundown park that is being sold for $2.7 million to a developer. But the city doesn’t want it to go. So they’re dreaming up alternatives. One they like a lot, apparently, is to force the seller to instead sell the park to the city. So here’s their logic:

Given that figure, the pro rata value per mobile home pad is $60,750. Compared to the high six-figure cost of building a single unit of affordable housing, the city’s purchase of this property makes economic sense. 

Here’s a better, more Midwestern approach. Give every household in the park $60,750. Tell them to locate to a less expensive area and buy a stick built home for cash for $60,750 and live their lives free of rent or mortgage payments. Where can you find homes for $60,000? Small towns all over the U.S. Based on the photos, these residents are currently living in dilapidated travel trailers and 1950’s units. My proposal would be a blessing for all involved.

EIN Presswire: Rob Carson Apologizes for ‘Trailer’ Remark, Facts on Ramsey ‘Mobile Home’ Appreciation Claims-MHVille Roundup

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WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, February 20, 2023 /EINPresswire.com/ -- “I actually grew up in one. Sorry for the offense,” said an email from Rob Carson to MHLivingNews. Beyond the apology for using the word 'trailer,' Carson was explaining that he grew up in what might be called 'a mobile home.' is a nationally syndicated WCBM talk radio personality and a Newsmax TV host. Carson was responding to concerns raised in a recent report on MHLivingNews that cited him and financial advice guru Dave Ramsey (Ramsey Solutions), among others, for purported factual and terminology errors about modern manufactured homes. Ramsey confirmed...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I understand that the industry wants to change its negative stigma, but let’s just give up on the old argument on what you call a mobile home. This article is all about a couple prominent financial podcast hosts daring to use the words that all Americans do when describing the industry: “trailer” and “mobile home”. The article states “In all languages, definitions and the meanings of words matter. A “manufactured home” is not a motor home or trailer, and although it is often called a “mobile home,” it is not that either.”

Here's the problem. The people have voted and the winner is “mobile home”. Why do I say that? Because Google analytics show that 90%+ of all searches on-line are using the words “mobile home”. And “trailer” scores just as many searches as “manufactured home”. You can’t argue with those stats. That’s why the people who are the most vocal about using “manufactured home” use the words “mobile home” in all their on-line marketing. Pretty hypocritical, huh?

Those podcast hosts used “trailer” and “mobile home” because that’s how their audiences refer to the product. If I invented a new term for mashed potatoes called "manipulated carb units" and then put that on grocery store shelves, I wouldn’t sell any because nobody would know what I’m talking about. You can’t blame any speaker for using the terms that their audience uses.

Before the internet, the discussion on what we call mobile homes was interesting. Now it’s just stupid.

The Northern Light: Planning commission approves second public hearing on manufactured home parks

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The Blaine Planning Commission approved a second public hearing on whether large manufactured home parks should be allowed in east Blaine. The public hearing is scheduled for the April 13 meeting. 

The commission voted 4-1 during its February 9 meeting to reopen the public hearing after the commission failed to reach a consensus on their recommendation for Blaine City Council. Some commissioners asked for a second public hearing because they wanted to discuss more research they did after the December 8 hearing. 

About 20 audience members listened intently to the commissioners’ debate, which lasted over an hour. Remote participants,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The City of Blaine is working overtime to come up with a politically correct way to tell mobile home park developers to go jump in the lake. Here’s the classic quote from this article “The people I know who came to the meeting aren’t antidevelopment,” Leeland said. “They’re, ‘Let’s make sure the development aligns with things that are good for Blaine.”

Obviously, the city would like to say “no” but in today’s politically correct America they can’t be honest, so instead they are working on a response that talks about the benefits of affordable housing yet still says “no”.

The Daytona Beach News-Journal: Proposal would open thousands of acres in Volusia County to mobile homes in rural areas

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Zoning laws for thousands of rural and agricultural acres in Volusia County could be changed to allow mobile homes as a permitted type of housing.

The issue is coming up for a second and final reading at Tuesday's County Council meeting, which will begin at 4 p.m. The item won't be heard earlier than 5:01 p.m.

If approved, the ordinance "would allow for mobile homes by right within all rural and agricultural zoning classifications," according to agenda materials. That includes the Resource Corridor (RC), Rural Agriculture (A-2), Transitional Agriculture (A-3 and A-4), Rural Residential (RR) and Rural Agricultural Estate (RA) zoning...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you own a home in Volusia County, Florida, you better sell it as fast as you can for whatever you can get. Can you imagine the decline in property values when you suddenly make mobile homes legal on thousands of acres in your county? Although this is not a “mobile home park” story – as none of this land is legal for mobile home parks but only individual mobile homes on land – it goes to show how stupid bureaucrats can be. Not sure that city employee started this concept, but I imagine that every single-family home in Volusia will be listed on Realtor.com shortly.

Connecticut's Official State Website: Attorney General Tong Launches Inquiry into Sun Communities Over Beechwood Community Concerns, Submits Testimony in Support of Mobile Manufactured Home Park Residents

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(Hartford, CT) – Attorney General William Tong today sent a letter to Sun Community management opening an inquiry into longstanding property management concerns at Beechwood Community mobile manufactured home park in Killingworth. Attorney General Tong additionally submitted testimony regarding two legislative proposals seeking to ensure mobile home parks in Connecticut remain both affordable and well-managed.

Over the past year, the Office of the Attorney General has received numerous complaints from Beechwood Community residents in Killingworth who have seen sustained, escalating rent hikes despite deteriorating conditions. Beechwood...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Let’s first address the concept that rents are high at this park. Here’s the stats for Killingworth, CT: SF homes average $411,000 and apartment rents are over $2,000 per month. Although the article refuses to state what the rents are now or what they were in the past, unless they’re $1,000 per month then they’re too cheap (based on the old rule of lot rents needing to be around 50% of apartment rents – which has no scientific basis at all).

As for the complaints about the property’s maintenance, let’s look at those complaints again:

“One disabled resident complained of a large beehive in front of her porch. The management company said they did not have money in their budget to remove it. The tenant paid herself to get it removed. Another tenant complained that her stairs lacked rails and were loose. She reported that maintenance agreed they were dangerous, but management has yet to fix them.”

Are you serious? That got the attention of the Attorney General of Connecticut? He must be really, really bored. The article does not even state if the homes belong to the tenants or the park (I’m betting the tenants) in which case those issues are not even a part of the park’s responsibility.

SUN is one of the best operators of mobile home parks in the U.S. They are a REIT. There are two sides to every story and I would personally bet that SUN’s story is the correct one – which this journalist chose not to share it at all.

Los Alamos Daily Post: Op-Ed: SB298 Recognizes Vulnerable Housing Situation

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“There’s an investment strategy hiding under the radar that has proven time and time again to be one of the best opportunities for investors, especially in times of uncertainty.” –52TEN–Mobile Home Park Investment Company

The main reason Mobile Home Parks are hot investments is that Mobile Homes are not mobile. It can cost as much to relocate a manufactured home as it would to move a stick-built home. The terms “Mobile Homes” and “Mobile Home Parks” falsely portray these homes and homeowners as portable.

Another reason these investment strategies are popular and able to hide “under the radar” is that mobile home parks and residents are...

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Our thoughts on this story:

“The main reason Mobile Home Parks are hot investments is that Mobile Homes are not mobile. It can cost as much to relocate a manufactured home as it would to move a stick-built home. The terms “Mobile Homes” and “Mobile Home Parks” falsely portray these homes and homeowners as portable.” DOES THAT MAKE ANY SENSE? The writer obviously has zero investing skills. What they are alluding to is that mobile homes can’t move and therefore the residents are extremely stable and tolerant of rent increases. People live in mobile home parks because they are cheaper than all other forms of housing, and they stay put because of that simple theorem. It’s not solely because the homes are difficult and costly to move.

The Texas Tribune: Houston wanted to lead the nation in long-term affordable housing. Now it’s backpedaling.

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Four years ago, as Houston recovered from Hurricane Harvey, city leaders turned to a decades-old model devised by civil rights activists and Black farmers to create permanently affordable homes at a scale and pace that no one had ever tried before.

The city’s ambitions caught the attention of housing advocates across the country.

“Mayor, I want to say the nation is excited about Houston,” Assata Richards, a third-generation resident of Houston’s Third Ward, told Mayor Sylvester Turner in the November 2018 City Council meeting where the project was unanimously approved.

“Houston could be the largest community land trust and a model for the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

No affordable housing concept works unless it is 100% subsidy-free. This one was not. Mobile home parks are. They operate without subsidies of any type. Yet they get no public acclaim for doing what bureaucrats have failed to do for the past century.

MLive: City of Kalamazoo signs site agreement for nonprofit’s pod housing community

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KALAMAZOO, MI -- The city of Kalamazoo signed an agreement allowing a nonprofit the option to buy or lease a site for use as a pod housing community, according to a representative of the nonprofit.

The agreement gives Housing Resources Inc. six months to initiate a lease or to purchase the site identified as a possible location for the pods, Housing Resources Inc. Associate Director Jacob Beach told Kalamazoo city commissioners during the Monday, Feb. 20, committee of the whole meeting.

The city of Kalamazoo signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the nonprofit Housing Resources Inc., that identifies the site, Beach said. Beach thanked...

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Our thoughts on this story:

What neighborhood would not want to have the land next door filled with homeless people and a sign that says “A Kzoo Pod Community – A Place of Dignity”? I bet you $1,000 that not a single person on the Kalamazoo committee that is promoting this concept lives anywhere near this proposed disaster.

KXLY: Cheney mobile home park residents at risk of losing homes over city project

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CHENEY, Wash. -- Dozens of people living at the North Cheney Mobile Home Park are now fighting to save their homes, as a plan to develop the property could force those living there to find someplace new to live.

Many low-income families live at the park, and some say they could be homeless if the redevelopment project moves forward.

"Absolute total frustrations and anger," said Douglas Brunell, who lives at the North Cheney Mobile Home Park.

Living in the same mobile home for 17 years, Brunell is retired and on a fixed income.

On February 13 at the city's public hearing, he found out that he could be kicked off the property if...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Better get ready for a ton more articles that start with this mantra:

“Dozens of people living at the North Cheney Mobile Home Park are now fighting to save their homes, as a plan to develop the property could force those living there to find someplace new to live.”

If the media and those who live in mobile home parks don’t get with the program and realize that low rents equate to “development land for sale” signs going up then they are in for a big shock.

And it’s also worth noting – since this journalist has zero real-life experience – that the residents cannot block the park owner’s right to develop the land into any use they want. The city makes that pretty clear when they state “"He talked about standard multi-family housing, he talked about a commercial space for some mixed use, concept, his representatives at the committee meeting, they were non-committal what the final site will actually look like," said Mark Schuller, city administrator for the City of Cheney.

City fathers celebrate when mobile home parks get torn down, so if the residents are looking for some help in that regard they are completely out of luck – which is one more reason that people need to stop trying to block higher mobile home park lot rents.

Standard-Examiner: Uncertainty at Layton mobile home park worries some, has spurred others to leave

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LAYTON — As jitters linger about the future of Cedarwood Mobile Home Park, some have left in search of a more stable place to live while others stay put, acknowledging their uncertain future.

“I want to take every last drop of my home,” said Gina Stone, one of those who has remained, even after the forced departure of residents living in 15 spaces last year to accommodate redevelopment plans.

She’s lived at the Layton mobile home park for 15 years, owned the unit she occupies since 2015 and suspects she’d have a hard time finding a replacement home, somewhere as cheap as Cedarwood, anyway. She pays $525 a month for the site where her...

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Our thoughts on this story:

It seems the utmost of hypocrisy when the same media outlets that publicly shame park owners for raising rents and bringing old properties back to life suddenly make out like mobile home parks are a valuable resource. Here’s the key quote from this article:

“Even so, the uncertainty — the specter of receiving notice at any moment that she may have to leave, like those who lived in the 15 now-unoccupied spaces before her — gnaws at her. The future of Cedarwood, located at 189 Main St. in Layton, has been the focus of public debate since the summer of 2021, when news emerged that Provo-based owner Boulder Ranch wanted to vacate the park, which contains around 70 trailer spaces in all, and redevelop the site.”

If you don’t want more Cedarwood stories, the media and residents need to cut out all the complaints about park rents going up and instead embrace those needed changes and be thankful the park is not redeveloped – because if rents don’t go up, then all parks ultimately close for redevelopment.

Post Bulletin: Bob's Trailer Court tenant agreements point to final closing date

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ROCHESTER — Bob’s Trailer Court is expected to be completely closed by June.

Less than five months after owners of the trailer park at 1915 Marion Road SE announced plans to develop the site into a senior housing complex, most occupants have either been evicted or removed as trespassers .

Four park residents, who sued Pennsylvania-based TSJ Parks LLC after their water service was unexpectedly turned off in November, appear to have agreed to move out of the park by May 31.

“I think this is all that’s left,” said Scott Kramer, a partner with TSJ Parks.

Calls to the tenants went unanswered, and the park is currently surrounded by a fence...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK here’s another one:

Less than five months after owners of the trailer park at 1915 Marion Road SE announced plans to develop the site into a senior housing complex, most occupants have either been evicted or removed as trespassers.

So let me get this straight: mobile home parks can be developed into other uses? Gee, maybe that would mean that residents need to applaud higher rent to keep them from being shut down and redeveloped?

Until the residents and media understand that the park owner is not bound by law or duty to be in the “trailer park” business – and that all land has a higher and better use – there will be a constant stream of these articles.

Montana Free Press: Landlords push back on pro-tenant, mobile-home park bills

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A pair of Republican-sponsored bills intended to help mobile-home park residents weather Montana’s acute housing shortage drew vehement opposition from park owners, real estate agents and the Montana Landlord Association in their initial hearings Monday morning.

House Bill 429, sponsored by Rep. George Nikolakakos, R-Great Falls, would require the owners of mobile-home parks with more than 50 units to give residents 60 days notice if they sell the property. It also requires owners to review counteroffers if a residents’ association uses that time to organize in an effort to purchase the park.

House Bill 428, sponsored by Rep. Mike...

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Our thoughts on this story:

“A pair of Republican-sponsored bills intended to help mobile-home park residents weather Montana’s acute housing shortage drew vehement opposition from park owners, real estate agents and the Montana Landlord Association” not counting every adult with an IQ greater than a lima bean. Come on, people. Residents are NOT going to be able to buy their mobile home park with 60 days notice. Or, in 99.99% of cases, with 600 days advance notice. Or, in 99.98% of all cases, with 600 years advance notice. All this does is slow down and complicate the basic property rights of the owner and the work of the free market.

The Olympian: This Lacey mobile home park was worried about its future. Now the city will study the topic

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Lacey City Council on Thursday approved a plan to study mobile homes in the area, a year after a resident raised concerns about the future of his own home. In December 2021, the resident sought a rezone of Mountain Greens, a mobile home park in the 5200 block of 55th Lane Southeast, wanting to change the zoning from low-density residential. The resident feared that under its current zoning the mobile home park could be sold and residents evicted so the property could be redeveloped. Mobile home owners own their homes, but typically rent the underlying land from the park owner.

The rezone request was not added to the Lacey Planning...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There’s an old saying that the scariest words are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”. Pretty sure that applies to this article. Thank heavens I don’t own a property in Lacey, WA.

Yahoo: Don't Call Them Mobile — Manufactured Housing Might Be The Answer To U.S. Housing Crisis

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In the first half of last year, more than 50,000 manufactured homes were shipped across the country — a 31% year-over-year increase, according to the latest numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The average sale price was $124,900, and while that number represents a two-year increase of nearly $40,000, manufactured homes remain an affordable option for an inventory-depleted U.S. housing market.

While 22 million Americans live in manufactured homes, according to the Manufactured Housing Institute, there remains a stigma nationally, as many people revert to memories of ill-kept mobile home parks. Mobile homes, legally defined as such because...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The average price of a mobile home last year was $125,000? Who wrote this article? I’m betting this was generated by AI or somebody who used the search term “modular” instead of “mobile home”. That’s what happens sometimes when you use the search term “manufactured home”. This article was then probably proofed by somebody who lives in Manhattan and thinks that $125,000 is “cheap”. Not sure if any of the data in this article is accurate, but it’s refreshing not to have another article bashing owners for raising rents, so I’ll consider that a win.

CBS News Bay Area: Crews make 35 dump runs, clear 200,000 lbs of trash from Stockton trailer park

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STOCKTON -- Isabel Lopez has lived across from the Stockton Park Village mobile home park at 1914 Auto Drive for years. She watched with a smile on her face as a long-awaited cleanup took place.

The San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office, along with other agencies, conducted 35 dump runs and collected 196,180 pounds of trash from the mobile home park last month, according to data released last week.

"I feel very happy honestly because before it was such an awful mess," Lopez said in Spanish. "...other people would come to throw away trash, it was like a dump site and there was a lot of animals."

The cleanup effort happened after a court...

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Our thoughts on this story:

When park owners do this same thing, all we get is bashed in the media. And when a city does that same clean-up of a rundown park, you would think they had found the cure for cancer. Hypocrisy anyone?

Bluefield Daily Telegraph: Lawmakers should help mobile home park tenants in danger of losing their homes

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I often wonder what powerful people would do if they — like me — were on the verge of losing their home.

Mercer County legislators Delegate Marty Gearheart, Senator Chandler Swope, and Delegate Doug Smith’s comments in a recent Bluefield Daily Telegraph article showed me that the thought clearly hasn’t crossed their minds and that they sure don’t care about people like me.

In case readers aren’t yet aware, some out-of-state rich people — through private equity organizations — are buying up manufactured housing communities like mine, Elkview Mobile Home Park, and raising the lot rent to unconscionable amounts. I’ve owned my home for...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Let’s focus on just this paragraph to begin with:

“In case readers aren’t yet aware, some out-of-state rich people — through private equity organizations — are buying up manufactured housing communities like mine, Elkview Mobile Home Park, and raising the lot rent to unconscionable amounts. I’ve owned my home for fourteen years and my lot rent never exceeded $225 per month. When one of these groups bought our community in 2022, they gave residents a 60-day notice, right before Christmas, that they were raising our rent from $225 to $525. That’s an 130 percent increase in just two months’ time.”

The average apartment in Princeton,, West Virginia – where this park is located – is $924 per month. So if $535 is “unconscionable” then what adjective applies to $924 per month? “Abhorrent”? “Extremely unconscionable”?

Here’s where all these articles fall flat. We live in the U.S. and our system is called “capitalism” which is completely different than “socialism”. In the U.S., the “free market” is what we rely on, and if people don’t want to pay $525 at Elkview then they should move to a place they feel is a better value for them. But it is not the right of the government to try to tell private property owners what they can charge. That’s a hallmark of “socialism”. Let’s compare this to a hamburger at McDonald’s. If the quarter pounder is $3, and you don’t want to pay $3, then you can go to Burger King and pay $2. But you can’t petition the government to force McDonald’s to reduce their burger to $2. Only mobile home parks face this type of insane criticism – probably because they don’t advertise in the media while McDonald’s does.

The Daily Post: Buena Vista Mobile Home Park to move during construction; they’re warned about the stress

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Palo Alto City Council acknowledged tonight (Feb. 13) that residents of the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park will deal with stress and anxiety as the Santa Clara County Housing Authority relocates them and replaces their homes.

“You‘re going to be forced to move out. You’re going to have to make large purchasing decisions,” Vice Mayor Greer Stone said to Buena Vista residents in the room. “We feel that anxiety that all of you are going to experience over the next several years.”

Flaherty Ward, the director of real estate for the housing authority, told council that all residents can return to the park after its renovated, and nobody should...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Yes, it’s this same property again. The city of Palo Alto spent $40 million to preserve the park as a park for 100 families. That’s $400,000 per family. Now they’re going to rebuild it into apartments and new mobile homes, and all of those folks they claimed they “saved” only have first option to buy their way back in (which they probably can’t afford). Does anyone else find this peculiarly stupid even for California? Why not give them all $400,000 and tell them to move to a cheaper state – wouldn’t that have been the best decision? Another case of a consortium of non-profits and city managers who are lost on how life really works.

Battle Creek Enquirer: Calhoun County Health Department investigates sewage overflow at Evergreen Oak Forest Mobile Home Park

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EMMETT TWP. — The Calhoun County Public Health Department is investigating a sewage overflow within Evergreen Oak Forest Mobile Home Park.

In a Wednesday release, county health officials said they ordered the owner of the park to correct the issues causing the failure of the sewer system after receiving several complaints from residents.

There are approximately 165 residents within the park, and park management has relocated two families to other trailers in the park as a result of the ongoing issues, county officials said.

The Health Department is not in the process of evicting anyone from the park at this time, nor has the park been...

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Our thoughts on this story:

What is “sewage overflow” – just an event of a sewer back-up from a clog. Does it only impact two families in a giant park? If this was not a mobile home park, would it even make the news? The answer, of course, is “no”.

Vermont Biz: Scott announces $4M program to help revitalize manufactured home communities

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Vermont Business Magazine Governor Phil Scott and the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) announced the launch of the , offering financial assistance to manufactured home communities (commonly known as mobile home park) as well as current and prospective manufactured home owners. The program, funded by $4 million from the federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), will provide financial assistance for park improvements, home repair and foundation installation.

“The MHIR program is focused on revitalizing an important part of the State’s affordable...

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Our thoughts on this story:

AT LAST, AN INTELLIGENT CONCEPT FOR IMPROVING AMERICA’S AFFORDABLE HOUSING STOCK! This is the kind of thinking that helps everyone – have the state help re-build failing infrastructure and re-populate vacant lots. Note that the entire State of Vermont program is 1/10th what California is paying for just one 100 household community. Will somebody please give Governor Phil Scott an award?