Mobile Home Park News Briefing

Mobile Home Park Investing Audios | Mobile Home Park Investing Videos | Mobile Home Park Mastery Podcast



16 News Now WNDU: Property owners promise improvements to residents of River Grove Mobile Home Park

Preview:

BERRIEN SPRINGS, Mich. (WNDU) - Homes of America, the property owners of River Grove Mobile Home Park in Berrien Springs, held a meeting on Friday to hear residents’ concerns.

Even though the meeting was held from 2 p.m., to 4 p.m., at the Berrien Springs Public Library, a public location, 16 News Now was told that press was not allowed inside.

After the meeting, residents shared that they were able to voice their concerns about abandoned trailers, and issues with water pipes and sewage.

According to residents of River Grove Mobile Home Park, many of the issues they have aren’t new and have been problems for years.

Homes of America is the...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

You’ve got to love it when the media and residents consider the park owner merely a punching bag. Well, when you punch the park owner repeatedly they tend to hit back with either redeveloping the park into another use or raising the rent to market levels to pay for all of the items residents are complaining about. Not sure that the residents have thought through this very carefully. Homes of America is the new owner with the goal of bringing this old, failing property back to life. They have risked their capital buying it and arranged for financing to make it possible. Instead of complaining and threatening, the residents should be asking the new owner “what more can we do to help in this process?” That’s the smart approach that’s a win/win for all involved.

FOX13 Salt Lake City: Mobile home park manager who feeds community honored with dream team surprise

Preview:

DAVIS COUNTY, Utah — Pat Blake is the manager of two mobile home parks in Davis County, whose selfless and kind-hearted nature knows no bounds.

“She doesn't buy herself clothing. She rather take that money and help people here.” said Pat’s daughter and Dream Team nominator, Anita York.

She regularly arranges for a Bountiful Food Pantry bus to visit each park twice a month, providing tenants with all the groceries they could ever need.

She also uses money from her own pocket to help children with school supplies and holiday gifts.

“Because that's what we're here for is to help other people. They need help. And that's what I'm here for,"...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Very nice article that is well written. If only giant non-profits could learn from people like this.

Cal Matters: A California program to fix mobile home parks approved 1 application in 10 years. Will a rebrand work?

Preview:

Mobile home residents in California face an outsize risk of failing utility systems, flooding and fires as a result of infrastructure that frequently hasn’t been updated or repaired in decades. 

In 1984, California passed a law to help remedy this: a loan program, paid into by the residents themselves, to buy and in later iterations, fix their parks.

But that solution, for the last 10 years, has helped only one of California’s 4,500 mobile home parks.

State administrators approved a single loan application, in 2021, from a fund now worth $33.5 million, the state’s Housing and Community Development Department confirmed to CalMatters. The...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Wow is this article stupid. First it makes the admission: “in 1984, California passed a law to help remedy this: a loan program, paid into by the residents themselves, to buy and in later iterations, fix their parks. But that solution, for the last 10 years, has helped only one of California’s 4,500 mobile home parks.” OK, that seems pretty bad. But then the reason given for the program’s failure was the “lack of demand”. Then the author explains that resident-owned mobile home parks are the solution to the condition of dilapidated properties because the residents care more about making repairs than third-party owners. What’s missing? That’s right THE CAPITAL TO MAKE THE REPAIRS. You can’t fix water, sewer and street systems with a happy attitude – it takes cold hard cash. And a lot of it. The very things that residents don’t have. So if the guy who wrote this would simply read his own article he’d realize that tenants buying parks is not going to happen because even the State of California won’t co-sign a guaranteed failing loan (only one deal has ever been approved) and only third-party owners have the capital and desire needed to bring old parks back to life. The solution? Obviously, GIVE THE $100 MILLION IN THE ACCOUNT ALREADY TO THE THIRD-PARTY OWNERS IN THE FORM OF GRANTS TO FOSTER MORE PARKS FROM BEING TORN DOWN. But, of course, they can’t take that obvious step because it ruins the narrative that all landlords are evil.

The Times Record: Harpswell state rep. introduces bill to support weatherizing manufactured homes

Preview:

Rep. Cheryl Golek, D-Harpswell, presented L.D. 815, “An Act to Provide Energy Efficiency Program Outreach and Assistance to Manufactured Housing Residents,” before the Legislature’s Labor and Housing Committee on Tuesday.

The bill would require Efficiency Maine and the Maine State Housing Authority to develop an education program and conduct outreach to residents of manufactured housing to increase the awareness of the energy efficiency programs available to residents. Additionally, the proposal would establish a program to provide financial assistance to qualifying individuals to purchase and install high-efficiency heat pump systems and...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is a great idea and we have been trying to educate our own residents on cheap ways to make a big impact on energy efficiency – things as simple as weatherstripping doors and installing thermal switch plates. If you look at the net impact of programs like this as far as dollars saved by residents as well as the number of those helped, this is exactly what states need to be working on instead of spending millions in grants for a few tenant groups to buy their parks.

Forbes: 3D-Printed, Factory-Built Homes Coming To A Community Near You

Preview:

California-based 3D-printing construction tech company Mighty Buildings says it’s on a new and ambitious growth trajectory. From Hawaii to Saudi Arabia, it plans to build communities of sustainable, net-zero, 3D-printed houses fabricated in microfactories that can be spun up virtually anywhere in a matter of months.

“The scale economics of our microfactories makes it feasible to build anywhere,” says Scott Gebicke, Mighty Buildings’ CEO. “This microfactory approach is one of the main reasons I joined the company because the scalability is really impressive.”

Gebicke has been at the helm of Mighty Buildings for just three months, following...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is like watching the advent of the big screen TV. The technology blows you away, but doesn’t take root until the price goes down 80% and becomes a mass-market product. These 3-D printed houses look much better than any mobile home ever will, but the price is only 20% less than a regular house. That’s not nearly enough to get people to embrace a new technology. Once this gets down to 50% off or so, then things might happen. But you still have to navigate a permit process that won’t allow these in a mobile home park without a HUD seal, or a subdivision without meeting the UBC. But it's going to happen some day (although it may be 10 or 20 years out).

Washington Post: Even small tornadoes can toss mobile homes. What about a massive one?

Preview:

ROLLING FORK, Miss. — Carolyn Washington was watching the news in her trailer Friday when a cousin called with a warning that wasn’t on TV: A tornado was about to touch down.

She raced up the street to Chuck’s Dairy Bar and sprinted to the bathroom, screaming, “Tornado!”

When the winds calmed down, she looked up: The restaurant’s roof was gone, and the tail end of a pickup truck was hanging over her head. Her home, where she normally shelters during tornado warnings, was on top of a nearby carwash.

“If I had been in there, I wouldn’t be talking to you,” she told a reporter.

Unlike her, other mobile home residents in this town of...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This article states that “there are steps that mobile home communities can take to better withstand storms. Researchers recommend having concrete foundations, anchor bolts and hurricane ties to secure structures, and adding tornado shelters or safe rooms.” Nobody can argue with the fact that mobile homes have a lower survival rate than brick houses when a 170 mph tornado comes through, but let’s get realistic here. These suggestions cost about $10,000 each per home. Who is going to pay for that? The tenants? It’s their home and that bill will fall on them. Mandate these type of items (like the government is already discussing on mobile home energy efficiency) and you will end up with more homeless people.

Multi-Housing News: How Havenpark Is Enhancing the MHC Resident Experience

Preview:

The manufactured housing sector has gained prominence in the past few years due to its resiliency and stability, particularly when economic conditions deteriorate and demand for affordable housing reaches new highs. While it is true that the sector is still experiencing decades-old stigma, some owners and operators are stubbornly determined to show that well-managed manufactured homes can be a palpable solution to the nationwide affordable housing crisis.

“We are in a unique position to contribute to the national conversation about the benefits offered by manufactured homes, including their affordability, contributions to increasing the...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Havenpark is a great owner/operator and this is a great article that more politicians need to read.

Denver 7 ABC: Colorado Democrats unveil a massive housing policy bill that would significantly rewrite land use policies

Preview:

DENVER — A broad coalition of lawmakers, cities, counties, climate advocates and even the business community came together on the west steps of the Colorado State Capitol on Wednesday to unveil a massive bill that’s aimed at addressing the housing crisis in the state.

Senate Bill 23-213 is 105-pages long and is the result of many months of work and 125 meetings with stakeholders around the state.

“Housing and the cost of housing and high cost of living Colorado is an issue that we know we need to take action to do something about for the state,” Gov. Jared Polis said during a news conference Wednesday.

Last year, Colorado lawmakers passed...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Have you ever been to Houston, Texas? Houston didn’t have zoning until recent times. The concept was that zoning was evil and you should build anything anywhere you want. There are topless bars next door to mansions and gas stations next to churches. Everyone hates it. And now Colorado wants to follow in Houston’s foot steps?

At least this person gets it: “I think they're going to hear very overwhelmingly, that this is a massive overreach by the state, and one that's completely unnecessary and a terrible precedent. You know, if the state can start legislating away, you know, local authority to ensure livability of neighborhoods and communities... where does it stop?”

The Ellsworth American: The affordable housing mirage

Preview:

In all of the hand-wringing over the lack of “affordable housing” in not only Hancock County, but the state of Maine and the nation as a whole, there is never any discussion of why housing costs have increased so dramatically and become increasingly unaffordable for large segments of society.

It starts with dirt.

Land prices have sharply escalated as our population continues to expand. Yet, to turn the first spade, or backhoe, of dirt for any housing construction we must understand how the basic costs have magnified.

First you need a permit, and more often than not, lots of permits. They cost money (and time) for you, or your...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Best article of the week. A must read.

The Weather Channel: Deaths In South Amplify Extreme Danger Of Manufactured Homes During Severe Weather

Preview:

Severe storms in the South that killed at least 21 people in Mississippi and Alabama highlight the dangers of being inside a mobile home or manufactured home during severe weather.

Many of the dozens of homes destroyed in the storms were manufactured. In the hardest-hit community of Rolling Fork, Mississippi, 24% of housing units in the county are manufactured homes according to the Census Bureau.

In fact, of the 104 tornado fatalities in 2021, 23 were in manufactured homes, according to NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center. In 2020, 39 of the 76 tornado deaths that year were in manufactured homes. Through Nov. 30 of this year, more than half...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The author loses me immediately when he states:

“As the income gap between the very wealthy and the very poor grows, even more people are exposed to the effects of natural disasters, he says. What we’ve learned is that when you think about disasters, they’re really societal at heart (and) people don’t like to hear that.”

So now we’re going to claim that those who are killed in tornados are the victims of class warfare.

I’m not sure if the writer of this article has any clue on science, but 1) no structure can withstand a 170 mph wind and 2) the southeast does not get more tornados because wealthy people arranged it that way.

In a society that is obsessed with everyone being a victim, I guess this is another shot at victimhood. I’m sure I’ll see late night TV ads offering to sue Mother Nature as soon as Camp Lejeune gets worn out.

KBPS: Some residents at Vista mobile home park still unable to return

Preview:

Denise Dougi had to leave all her worldly possessions behind apart from a few essentials when disaster struck at Green Valley Mobile Home Park last Thursday morning.

“It was my sanctuary,” she said. “Nobody lives there but me. I’m really sad not to be able to go into my house with my things.”

Flooding caused a sinkhole behind Dougi’s home, resulting in 17 residents being ordered to evacuate by emergency crews.

Since then, Dougi has been staying with her mother. She has no idea when, or if, she’ll be able to return.

“I’ve just decorated my living room," Dougi said. “I’ve been there three years and I finally felt comfortable enough to start...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is one of those cases where local officials need to step in and help these people. There’s no way that anybody can predict a sinkhole and nobody did anything wrong. However, I’m sure that insurance does not cover this in any way and there’s no way these residents can live in a hotel for the months or years needed before California approves them to go back inside their homes (if they are ever let in again). If the state can allocate $100,000 per household just to move a mobile home (see the articles from prior weeks) you would think they could write a couple checks to help these people out.

AXIOS Phoenix: Phoenix provides funding but won't stop mobile home park demolition

Preview:

The Phoenix City Council voted Wednesday to spend $2.5 million to assist residents of three mobile home parks in finding new housing but stopped short of supporting a controversial zoning move that might have allowed residents to stay.

  • The parks are scheduled to close in the next two months to be redeveloped. Residents will be evicted if they don't move willingly.

State of play: The council's decision came after more than four hours of emotional testimony from park residents facing possible eviction.

  • Children who missed school to attend the meeting, seniors who lived in the parks for decades and parents afraid their families will be...
Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Well written article that tells the facts without political spinning. Essentially, the tenants wanted the city council to block their park from being redeveloped and the “city legal staff told the council the zoning change would violate a state law that protects private property owners.”

Spectrum News 1: City Council demands answers from mobile home park management

Preview:

MOUNT WASHINGTON, Ky. — The residents of the Live Oaks Mobile Home park and Spectrum News 1 are finally hearing from the management company about multiple rent hikes.

Spectrum News 1 began investigating resident claims in January and hasn’t been able to speak with management. The company wouldn’t return our calls, so the Mount Washington city council asked them to watch our stories and respond.

Heather Thacker spoke before the city council on Monday, March 27. Thacker works for Lasso Capital, the New York City-based private investment company that owns Live Oaks.

She was at the meeting because Live Oaks wants a nearby property to be...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

You know you have a problem with elected officials when they take their talking points from a news channel. Next they will be posing with the TV anchor while wearing promotional T-shirts and receiving free key chains.

The Daily World: Mobile home tenants fight rent increases

Preview:

In 2008, Caroline Hardy and her husband, Bill, downsized into a mobile home park in South Aberdeen. They both retired a few years later — Caroline from 15 years at Stafford Creek Corrections Center, and then 30 years at Lamb Grays Harbor, which supplied timber mills with machinery; Bill from 38 years at Marshall’s Garden and Pet Store — and started collecting social security checks.

There, they were “real happy,” and “the neighbors are wonderful and everyone gets along,” Caroline said. This would be their “forever home,” they thought.

Now they aren’t so sure.

Last June, the couple — and their many neighbors at the park — pulled a letter...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Leisure Manor is located in Auburn, Washington, where the average single-family home price is $568,50 and the average three-bedroom apartment rent is over $2,600 per month. The park owner raised the rent from $485 per month to $635 per month. At the new “high” rent that’s $2,000 per month less than the apartments in town. These type of article infuriate me. Keep on bashing the owner and I guarantee they’ll wind up tearing the park down and building apartments.

Phoenix New Times: ‘I'm Being Displaced’: Phoenix City Council Fails to Stop Evictions at Three Trailer Parks

Preview:

A young girl approached the podium on March 22 and looked up at the members of the Phoenix City Council seated before her. "My name is Michelle," she said in Spanish. "I'm being displaced."

Last April, Michelle's family was one of the dozens living in the Periwinkle Mobile Home Park that received an unexpected eviction notice from Grand Canyon University. According to the notice, residents had just six months to leave their longtime homes.

In the months since, Periwinkle residents have joined forces with two other Phoenix mobile home parks whose inhabitants are also facing eviction. The other parks are Las Casitas — which is located at 18th...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Thank havens that the city council has not gone insane and, when attempted to be bullied into breaking the law and vote to block a piece of land from being developed simply because the residents didn’t like it, instead voted in favor of the redevelopment stating “most councilmembers who opposed the zoning overlay and moratorium said they voted against it over concerns about whether the policy was legal.” When you ignore property laws you usher in the end of private property ownership and you are on a crash-course with the same socialism reflected in the article above.

This is Reno: Mobile home park residents urge lawmakers to stabilize rents: ‘We are in dire need’

Preview:

For the last decade, Jeanneil Marzan paid $645 a month to rent a space for her manufactured home at Sierra Royal Mobile Park. 

When the first rent increase of $40 came in September 2022, the Sparks resident found it reasonable even living on a fixed income. 

Everything changed in December after a multi-billion dollar global private equity investor, Carlyle Group, bought the park and notified its residents of the 151-home community that rent would be increasing to $1,010 per month.

Marzan, along with residents of her community, pleaded with state lawmakers Monday to consider rent stabilization legislation for mobile home parks to regulate...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

A recent poll showed that 70% of Millennials would vote for a socialist presidential candidate. And it’s apparent in this story as Nevada’s “Senate Bill 275, brought forth by Democratic state Sen. Skip Daly, would prevent landlords of manufactured home parks from raising rents higher than the maximum annual rent increase percentage calculated by the (Nevada) Housing Division.” After that they should set a commission to control pricing of all products – from cars to milk – and then all you need is a commission to set how much of each product should be produced. Here’s the Wikipedia definition of socialism “a political and economic theory of social organization which advocates that the means of production, distribution and exchange should be owned or regulated by the community as a whole”. Am I missing something here, comrade?

CBS8: Vista mobile home park evacuated due to nearby sinkhole and flooding

Preview:

VISTA, California — Flooding of unknown origin forced the evacuation of a dozen mobile homes at Green Valley Mobile Home Park in Vista on Thursday morning.

Denise Dougi said she woke up and discovered her home had shifted.

"I woke up this morning and heard running water; there was no reason for me to hear running water. I went outside; I noticed things were not right. I noticed my stairway had moved; there’s no reason my stairway should’ve moved," she said.

"I went down my stairs. My concrete driveway has buckled up; it has trapped my car," said Dougi.

She said she also noticed her front door wouldn't open. She called 911.

"There’s...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Between fires, flooding, landslides, homelessness, crime, taxes – and now even sinkholes – you would think that there is a conspiracy to turn California back into agricultural land as residents flee. Will there one day be avocado orchards again where Bel Air used to stand?

The Ledger: Habitat for Humanity supports rare renovation project for Lakeland veteran's mobile home

Preview:

LAKELAND — A few days before St. Patrick’s Day, a swarm of green-clad volunteers busily dug, sawed and drilled outside a mobile home in a rural patch of the Kathleen area. Posts went into the ground, preparing for a front deck and wheelchair ramp to be installed at the front of the structure.

Though it didn’t reflect the expected image, the activity was part of a Habitat for Humanity project. The Lakeland chapter of the international nonprofit is providing both materials and muscle to help the owner, Sunil Persaud, with a complete renovation of the decades-old manufactured home.

It is just the second time that Lakeland Habitat for...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is a great article and this is exactly what Habitat for Humanity should be doing instead of building $200,000 modular homes (as described in an earlier mention above). For that same money, they could rebuild 10 to 20 existing homes and help many more people for the same cost.

Cape Cod Times: Pocasset mobile home park residents try again to buy land. Judge gives opinion.

Preview:

A Superior Court judge has rejected a move to reverse his decision that determined a Wyoming investment firm was the rightful buyer of the Pocasset Mobile Home Park.

Judge Michael Callan's original Jan. 11 decision seemed to end a years-long legal battle between Crown Communities, LLC, and the Pocasset Park Association, with both sides seeking ownership of the Bourne park, also known as The Park at Pocasset.

The mobile home park has about 170 residents at its prime location off Barlow's Landing Road. The current owner is Philip Austin, trustee of the Charles W. Austin Trust.

The association would have been able to purchase the park,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The park residents apparently cheated on the required 51% of signatures to start the process of exercising their first option, and they got caught. No amount of woke pandering is going to fix this simple fact, and the judge stood up for the park owner – and the letter of the law – and did not back down. Good for him!

Warren County Record: Belaire trailer park taken over by new owner

Preview:

Property investor Josh Scronce told Truesdale city leaders last week that he followed through with his purchase of the Belaire Mobile Home Park in February, and is taking immediate action to restore the run-down neighborhood.

Scronce first announced in January that his business, Signature Investment Group, was planning to purchase the mobile home park.

Since closing on the sale Feb. 17, the first course of action has been to become familiar with residents and assess the condition of various mobile homes that need to either be renovated or removed, Scronce said.

“I’ve met about 75 percent of the people, and so far, so good,” Scronce told...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Best article of the week. It gives credit where credit is due, and focuses on the benefits to the majority of residents and not the gripes of the few that hate positive change.

Independent Record: Helena’s most affordable starter homes

Preview:

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Refreshing to see a journalist not grab the low-hanging fruit and title this “mobile homes” instead of “starter homes”.

Greensboro: Greensboro ponders community land trust to encourage affordable housing

Preview:

GREENSBORO — City officials are considering a new way to keep housing affordable: creating a community land trust.

While the concept of community land trusts (CLT) has been around for 50 years, it would be a first for Greensboro.

CLTs are nonprofits that buy or build housing, retail or offices using public or private money. Those structures are then sold to a low-income buyer who qualifies for a mortgage. However, the CLT retains ownership of the land, holding it in trust with a 99-year lease to the buyer.

As part of the agreement to buy the structure, the buyer agrees to sell it at an affordable price.

Buyers would be...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I’m kind of lost on how this is any different than the city simply co-signing on a traditional mortgage. But the bigger question is “who is going to pay for this?” Most cities, states (and the U.S. government ) are completely broke and can’t possibly actually afford to do any of these initiatives, which cost in the millions of dollars. So who is actually writing the checks on programs like this?

Richmond Biz Sense: Powhatan Habitat chapter places first modular home

Preview:

To provide its latest home for a family in need, an area housing nonprofit took a different approach that it believes is the first of its kind among its regional peers.

Habitat for Humanity–Powhatan recently provided a mother and son with its first modular home, marking what Executive Director Susan Winiecki described as a new approach for Habitat affiliates in the region to provide lower-income families with housing.

Also known as prefabricated or factory-built homes, modular homes are a type of manufactured home that are mostly built in sections off-site and then delivered and assembled. The home is placed on a foundation using a crane,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

A $200,000 house is NOT affordable housing. Not even close. And a 1,200 sq. ft. house for $200,000 is NOT reason for celebration. Good thing that non-profits like Habitat for Humanity are staffed with people with zero business skills so they can celebrate wasting money at this level. You could have bought a standard 1,200 sq. ft. mobile home for $70,000 installed – and that’s almost 70% less. So you could have installed three homes for the price of one. Crazy.

ABC 10 NEWS San Diego: Senior mobile home community in Oceanside could see rent spike

Preview:

OCEANSIDE, Calif. (KGTV) — Rent could be going up again for seniors that live inside the Laguna Vista Mobile Home Park, a senior community, but the seniors say they can't quite keep up, especially on a fixed income.

This mobile home is all Frank Kazerski knows.

"I've lived here since 2009," said Kazerski.

He doesn't know what could be next if his rent is increased again.

"The rent portion is $631. The rest is for trash, sewer, water bill," he said.

Every July, the residents expect an increase of some sort to account for inflation but the owner of the park filed an application to have rent raisedeven more.

"I can't be making these extra...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Give me a break. The park increased rents just $27 per month and people are saying that they can’t buy food, medicine or the necessities of life because of that increase. This park is in California. A hamburger costs $10 at McDonalds there. When will people acknowledge that some states are incredibly expensive to live in (like California) and are not appropriate for those on limited incomes, who should instead move to states that are more affordable? I can already tell you when we will see this park in the news again: when they tear it down to make room for a better use that does not have pushback like this on a $27 per month price increase. This article is ridiculous.

Community Impact: 170-acre Rockrose Ranch brings modern manufactured home community to Willis

Preview:

Rockrose Ranch at Lake Conroe, a 700-home community, will celebrate its grand opening March 25 in Willis, developer Inspire Communities announced in a March 16 news release.

The community spans 170 acres at 11848 Calvary Road, just west of I-45, and features a gated active adult village as well as a section of homes open to all ages, according to the release. Rockrose Ranch has prices starting in the $110,000s to $220,000s and floor plans ranging from two to three bedrooms, two bathrooms, front porches and open-concept living areas.

According to its website, Inspire Communities claims to provide affordable, modern manufactured homes for...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is NOT a “manufactured home community” – at least when you read this announcement “Rockrose Ranch has prices starting in the $110,000s to $220,000s”. In last week’s articles a developer called his mobile home park a “cottage community” so that it had no negative stigma. This owner needs to come up with a different name, too, because it’s not fair to call this concept basically a “mobile home park” as it has absolutely nothing to do with that concept other than residents paying lot rent as opposed to owning the land.