Mobile Home Park News Briefing

Mobile Home Park Investing Audios | Mobile Home Park Investing Videos | Mobile Home Park Mastery Podcast



My Edmonds News: The new law giving mobile home residents a chance to buy their parks

Preview:

A mobile home park in Moses Lake is up for sale and a new state law assures residents a shot at buying the property.

In the past they might’ve never known it was on the market until after it was sold.

Owners of North Pointe notified residents on July 17 that they are looking to sell the 25-space  mobile home park.

This started the clock on a process providing those living there and eligible organizations approved by the state Department of Commerce an opportunity to compete with other potential buyers.

That chance is etched into a law that took effect Sunday and is intended to help preserve this stock of affordable housing.

Until now,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The residents rarely have the ability to come up with the money on these ridiculous first-option rules. The odds are about as large as a meteorite hitting the title company. Just read the article itself. Here’s the proof:

“There are now 24 resident-owned communities in Washington and roughly 300 across the country, she said”

Here’s a reality check. There are around 44,000 mobile home parks in the U.S. There are around 300 resident-owned communities. That’s .0.0068% probability that they pull it off. Or conversely a 99.32% chance they can’t. Is that really worth the delay these first-option rules require? Clearly not. Then why pass such nonsense? Because it panders to the voting base and most voters are too stupid to know the actual math.

WENY: Clock Counting Down for Cherry Lane Park After New Agreement Executed

Preview:

SOUTHPORT, N.Y. (WENY) -- WENY News is taking a closer look at the licensing agreement between the town of Southport and Cherry Lane Park mobile home park on Sherman Avenue.

 

On July 17th, the Southport town board voted to approve a license agreement with Cherry Lane Park through December 31st, 2023. According to an agreement obtained by WENY News through a Freedom of Information request, Cherry Lane Park's owner has 10 days to apply for a demolition permit. Monday, July 31st is the tenth business day since the agreement was executed. The Southport town clerk informed WENY News there is no record on file at this time.

According...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

More nonsense about back-seat driving residents and media reporters trying to second guess complicated land development issues – kind of like me trying to critique brain surgery.

KRGV: Residents of mobile home park in McAllen told to move as city moves forward with expansion of convention center

Preview:

A McAllen man has until October to leave his home of 30 years.

Pete Martinez is among the 17 homeowners who were ordered by the city of McAllen to leave the Catalina Mobile Home Park, located near the city’s convention center.

“Frankly, I don't think I am going to do it,” Martinez said. “It's all about business. They want to make money and they don't care what they do to the people… and I am tired of being pushed around"

On April 3, Martinez and other residents of the mobile home park received a letter from the city that said residents must be off the premises by October 1.

McAllen City Manager Roy Rodriguez said the city bought the...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I have to admit that I find it ironic when cities shut down parks and think they can rationalize it with flowery prose:

McAllen City Manager Roy Rodriguez said the city bought the property three years ago for expansion purposes. “We are expanding the campus for the McAllen Convention Center and outside festivities like MXLAN, this weekend is a perfect example of how we are expanding the facility,” Rodriguez said. “We are ready to start attempting to develop it”

I guess all park owners can learn from this and use the old Teddy Roosevelt phrase when the media calls “we shall endeavor to persevere” with property redevelopment.

The Islander Classifieds: Pines residents lack notice on trailer park sale

Preview:

Homeowners in the Pines trailer park have spoken.

Despite reports of an upcoming closing date for the sale of the Pines Trailer Park in Bradenton Beach, several Pines residents reached out to The Islander to insist they have received no official notice from the park owners or their lawyers.

David Graham, treasurer of the Pines homeowner’s association and others contacted The Islander July 25-July 29 by email, questioning a July 25 report in The Islander where a source stated a “closing is expected on or around Sept. 21.”

The Islander verified the source and their information.

“I am the treasurer of the HOA board of the park. I have been...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The buyers are paying $16,250,000 ($200,000 per lot) for a rundown park. Exactly how would this not be a redevelopment deal? The reason the residents have probably not received notice is that the owner is not going to do so until after the deal has closed. How could anyone think that there will be any other outcome? 

Superior Telegram: Committee rejects offers for Parkland trailer park sites

Preview:

SUPERIOR — Douglas County officials are considering a different approach to selling two former mobile home parks in Parkland after one proposal and one bid fell short of the county’s requirements to get the land for free.

The Land and Development Committee rejected the offers Tuesday, July 25 to take the former Country Acres properties off the county’s hands.

The county put the property out to bid with no minimum price, but the transfer of property was contingent on an agreement and bond to ensure the trailer homes that remain on the sites are removed.

A bid by Dubesa LLC proposed paying the county $2,000 for the property with a...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Another article about a county government shutting down a park. Between owners wanting to redevelop for more profitable uses – and city/county/state governments wanting to shut them down to remove affordable housing units from their neighborhoods – mobile home parks may soon be listed as an endangered species.

The U.S. Sun: Home Depot is selling an $8,325 tiny home with an L-shape wall and natural light

Preview:

AS tiny homes gain popularity across the country, The Home Depot is showing you don’t have to splurge to attain home ownership with a small house available for just north of $8,000.

As Americans look to lower their monthly spending, tiny homes have become more common, no matter if you’re living by yourself or with a family.

With traditional homes’ price tags typically set above $200,000 and monthly mortgage payments remaining high across the board, some people turn to an unorthodox and minimalist lifestyle: tiny homes.

Many people have converted vans and sheds into full-scale tiny homes for less than $10,000.

At The Home Depot, several...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, these are cool. And 144 sq. ft. for $8,325 means a 1,000 sq. ft. model (which is much more livable) would only cost around $50,000. And, yes, this is the solution to the affordable housing crisis. And, no, you can’t build them virtually anywhere in the U.S. due to the Uniform Building Code. And the construction industry will never let that code be changed. So when people tell you that it’s impossible to build affordable housing they’re not telling you the truth. The truth is that the government ensures that you can’t with codes that most people don’t even know exist. Change the codes and between this type of option and 3-D printed homes you could provide $150,000 stick-built dwellings in cities across America (the average lot in the U.S. is $80,000 so you have to add that in, too, thus the $150,000 price point).

The Press Democrat: 2 Petaluma mobile home parks are threatening to close, but there’s a lot that comes first

Preview:

In the wake of Petaluma moving to tighten rent control and other protections in its mobile home parks, two park owners have now signaled they may shut down, potentially upending the lives of hundreds.

At the 78-unit Little Woods Mobile Villa and the 102-unit Youngstown Mobile Home Park, residents received letters this month announcing a “potential closure.” A consultant, hired to assess the impact of such a move, began appearing on doorsteps.

It was the second shock for mobile homeowners at Youngstown where less than two weeks prior, they received another notice saying the park would no longer be restricted to older residents.

Concern,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s the key quote from this article:

“In the wake of Petaluma moving to tighten rent control and other protections in its mobile home parks, two park owners have now signalled they may shut down”.

The writer then goes on to point out how this will destroy hundreds of residents’ lives who can find no place even remotely as cheap to live.

OK, now who is then responsible for those folks being homeless? The group that passes the rent control. Their vote effectively signalled the death warrant for these properties. And they won’t be alone. I’m sure that other parks in Petaluma will follow their lead and redevelop into different uses.

I’ve written for nearly 20 years about the fact that rent control equals park redevelopment. It’s never going to change. Want to eliminate mobile home parks in your city/county/state? Simple solution: just pass rent control.

TB News Watch: Sale of mobile home park remains on table

Preview:

THUNDER BAY — A controversial proposal to sell a city-owned mobile home park remains on the table after city council voted to receive more information on the issue.

Residents at Hillcourt Estates will now wait until March of next year to learn whether the city will move forward with a sale.

Council made the decision on a narrow 7-5 vote after a debate charged with concerns over the availability of affordable housing in the city.

Hillcourt residents have vocally opposed a sale, submitting a petition bearing over 400 signatures.

Presenting to council on Monday alongside other residents, Mandy Bruyere called municipal ownership a win-win,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s one of the classic quotes of all time regarding this city-owned park:

“We’re making over $170,000 a year, so if any private developer would come in, I imagine they would maintain their asset the same way we would,” he said.

For those who have little math skills – which this bureaucrat hopes applies to residents of the park -- $170,000 per year in net income at a 6% cap rate works out to only $2,800,000. Do you think that a big piece of land near the waterfront in Ontario, Canada might be worth a little more than $2,800,000?

Here’s how this is really going to work out. The city is going to sell the property to a developer and they will swiftly tear it down to build apartments. The city removes all of the cost the park inflicts on the city (school tuition, uninsured hospital visits, etc.), improves the drive-up appeal of the neighborhood, and gets out from under the tough job of managing a mobile home park. And everyone knows it, regardless of what they may say at city council meetings.

The Islander: Pines park residents await sale announcement

Preview:

The Pines Trailer Park is a quiet place these days.

Residents in the mobile home park, 103 Church Ave., Bradenton Beach, have heard little about the pending sale of the land they lease for their homes.

Few people are talking about the matter but one resident, who requested anonymity, said residents were told a closing is expected on or around Sept. 21.

The park owner is Jackson Partnership, with Richard and William Jackson as officers.

They listed the park for sale for $16 million in January, prompting an effort by homeowners in the park to raise the money to purchase the land.

Homeowners Feb. 24 voted to form a cooperative to make a...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The buyer is spending $16,250,000 for 87 mobile home lots. That’s around $200,000 per lot. Look at the photos of the property. Look at the location. Who in the world would not realize this is going to be torn down and redeveloped in the extremely near future?

KESQ: Cathedral City mobile home park residents raise power outage safety concerns amid extreme heat

Preview:

Residents at Caliente Sands Mobile Home Park in Cathedral City are expressing frustration and concern after experiencing multiple power outages this week with little or no prior notice. The sudden blackouts occurred during a period of extreme heat, creating a dangerous situation for the mobile home community.

"It was like 115 outside," said Barbara Cleary. "It was out of nowhere, the power went off."

Cleary said the power outages were a result of a private electric company hired by the management to work on a transformer within the park. She said paper notices were distributed to residents' mailboxes, but the warning given was far...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is getting absolutely ridiculous. The power in a mobile home park was cut-off for a brief while for necessary repairs to a transformer and the residents are going beserk because they didn’t get enough notice. I have lost my power for days at a time in a stick-built house in the middle of the summer – due to a major storm – and the entire town survived just fine. Here’s what both sides say:

“{the manager] said the power outages were a result of a private electric company hired by the management to work on a transformer within the park. She said paper notices were distributed to residents' mailboxes, but the warning given was far from sufficient. "We're supposed to have 72 hours notice, they didn't even come close to doing that," she said. One of the notices had the wrong date listed on it, leading to additional confusion”.

Not that many decades ago there was no air-conditioning. And 100 years before that, there was no electricity. And people survived just fine. Is America so pathetic now that it can’t get along even for a couple hours without power? 

Sky-Hi News: Letter to the editor: Kremmling mobile home park sees rent, water and sewage cost increases

Preview:

Over the weekend at least two Denver TV stations ran stories about a woman who has filed a complaint against the owners of the mobile home park where she lives, citing rate increases and changes to policies that have made life there a challenge. 

Not everyone is aware, but what used to be Rayner’s Trailer Park and is now called Estates at the Bluff, has been purchased in recent months by investors from Texas. The first change came when water meters were installed on all the homes, so we would start paying for our own water and sewer services.
Now our rent is going up $150 a month the first of August a prohibitive amount for most of...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Great letter to the media from this owner when they were accused of raising rent and ruining the park:
When contacted, Brett Garner, the park manager until recently, responded in writing, citing some of the options.

“1. We can leave the community as it is, not pursue improvements, and leave lots rents close to where they were.”  “2. Increase the quality of the community by adding the lots on the east end, connect the existing community to the newly installed water and sewer pipe (planned for next summer), repave the roads (planned for July 2023), add a recreation area on the north side of the park, and clean up the look of the community so that it’s more desirable for you and all residents to live in. We chose to go with option two because, in our eyes, it’s what’s best for our immediate community (Estates at The Bluff) and the community at large (Kremmling).“

There’s no question that in any 100-space park there are probably 2 people who can’t afford to pay more rent and want to live in squalor if that’s the cheapest option. But the majority don’t agree and the key to running a business is to please the majority of your customers, not some tiny fringe faction.

WFTV9: No water, homes torn apart: residents around mobile home park feel abandoned

Preview:

ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. — Giovanni Jimenez said the Lake Downey Mobile Home Park was the only home he’s ever known. Through 17 years, he’s watched it turn from a vibrant, family-like Hispanic neighborhood to something more suited as a background in Mad Max.

Few of the trailers in the park haven’t been vandalized. The lucky ones have smashed windows and broken doors. Others have had entire sides torn off and metal stripped by vandals and scrappers that prowl the neighborhood, looking for things to sell.

The water system in the park was shut off in the spring. Before that, the state considered it unsafe to drink, according to a lawsuit filed by...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Yet again the residents think they have won by harassing the owner into selling the land to a developer – then shocked and agitated when they can’t find anywhere even remotely as inexpensive to live:

“The Jimenez family is supposed to pay $440 in lot fees each month. Like the other tenants, they’ve stopped those payments. However, they can’t afford to move anywhere else. The day they have to pack up is fast approaching. County records show the residents were supposed to vacate the premises by the end of June as the property owner prepared to sell the park to a developer.”

I don’t know anything about this property or any of its troubles, but it seems to me that the residents massively overplayed their hand and now they’re homeless as a result. You are going to see much more of this until America stops being a nation of litigation and instead strives to focus on win/win strategies.

Petaluma Argus Courier: 2 Petaluma mobile home parks threaten closure over rent ordinance

Preview:

Attempts by city leaders to bring Petaluma’s mobile home tenant protections in line with other Sonoma County cities has led to an extreme side effect, as two of the city’s largest mobile home parks are now threatening to shut down completely, potentially resulting in hundreds of local residents without homes.

Owners of both Little Woods Mobile Villa, a 78-unit all-ages mobile home park at 1821 Lakeville Hwy., and Youngstown, a 102-unit all-seniors mobile home park at 911 N. McDowell Blvd., have notified residents of their potential plans to close the parks and convert them to other uses.

“There often comes a time in the life of a park...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s a great quote from the property owner:

“There often comes a time in the life of a park that a decision must be made as to whether it is feasible to continue operating a park when the physical improvements and infrastructure become older and costly to repair and replace, and/or the park owners conclude they can no longer economically operate the park based on measures taken by state and local government,” read a July 6 letter from Little Woods Mobile Villa managers to residents. Due to such factors, the letter stated, the owners were “considering whether it is viable to continue operating the park as a mobile home park, and are exploring the option of converting the park.”

Rent control equals redevelopment – it’s just that simple. It’s unbelievable that these bureaucrats can’t see that they have absolutely no power over the property owner’s right to simply tear the park down and build something else on the property that is not subject to rent control. Total idiots. They are personally responsible for hundreds of households being homeless as a part of their actions in this case.

Independent Tribune: WeBuild: Why we can't wait on affordable housing

Preview:

The old guard in any society resents new methods, for old guards wear the decorations and medals won by waging battle in the accepted manner.” — Martin Luther King Jr., Why We Can’t Wait

Over the last 18 months, the evolution of WeBuild Concord as a nonprofit housing developer has created greater urgency for affordable housing, systems change, and a framework for Concord and Cabarrus County. WeBuild and its partners currently have 14 single-family, multi-family, NOAH (naturally occurring affordable housing), and mixed-use housing projects under construction or in the permit process comprising over 60 homes. As a relatively new entity...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Am I the only one or doesn’t this program sound like the old “company store” from the 19th century where miners and manufacturing workers were not paid in U.S. currency but in credits they could only use at the “company store” and had no actual monetary value? In this case, you buy a stick-built home with real cash and yet all you get is a 99-year land lease under which you can only sell your home back to this “land trust” and after 99-years – if you don’t sell – they can just take it back for free. Since the whole point of home ownership is to gain equity as home prices increase, they are effectively neutering the ability to profit from home ownership. Bad deal for the buyers, in my opinion.

The Banner: McKenzie to Rezone Forrest Avenue Mobile Home Park

Preview:

Soon, the mobile home park located on Forrest Avenue in McKenzie could cease to exist. During the monthly meeting of the McKenzie City Council, the board approved (on the first reading) Ordinance 554 to amend the mobile home park property from R-4 (residential mobile home) to R-3 (high-density residential). This allows the owners to develop the property for the construction of “townhouses.”

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Same recurring theme:

Soon, the mobile home park located on Forrest Avenue in McKenzie could cease to exist. During the monthly meeting of the McKenzie City Council, the board approved (on the first reading) Ordinance 554 to amend the mobile home park property from R-4 (residential mobile home) to R-3 (high-density residential). This allows the owners to develop the property for the construction of “townhouses.”

Redevelopment of mobile home parks is accelerating for more profitable housing options. Residents and bureaucrats better take note because they will soon find out that the only way to stem this tide is to drop the strategy of public shaming park owners who engage in reasonable rent increases and instead say to owners “how much would the rent have to be to keep this park in operation and away from the wrecking ball?” and then happily pay it.

CBS Colorado: Arapahoe County mobile home park owner says some residents' complaints are "inaccurate" and "untrue"

Preview:

Residents at a mobile home park in Arapahoe County, Foxridge Farm, have made their voices heard this summer, saying they've "had enough," with their management company's policy changes, rent increases, and upkeep of the grounds. Now, a representative with the company, Ascentia, is offering a response to CBS News Colorado's reporting on the issue. 

"Much of the information shared in your story is inaccurate and untrue," wrote Marko Vukovich, Vice President of Operations for Acentia, in an email to CBS News Colorado. "We have owned and operated Foxridge Farm for over 43 years and take great pride in serving our residents and fulfilling our...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

We all know that mobile home park residents are all angels and can do no wrong. Certainly, they would never lie to the media, right? Well, I’ve not been to this property, but I know Acentia and they are one of the best operators in the U.S. with exemplary property condition and professional management. I’m pretty sure that the owners are correct when they say:

"Much of the information shared in your story is inaccurate and untrue," wrote Marko Vukovich, Vice President of Operations for Acentia, in an email to CBS News Colorado. "We have owned and operated Foxridge Farm for over 43 years and take great pride in serving our residents and fulfilling our mission, vision, and values. We aim to offer a clean, safe, healthy community for many years. We are not in business for the quick profit and resent any such accusation."

So why would the residents lie to the press? Well, let me think what their motive might be? Maybe they think that they can press the bureaucrats into freezing their rent or getting them some free stuff. I’m willing to bet $100 that if we all went out to Foxridge Farms right now we’d look at each other with a puzzled look and say “what are these tenants talking about?”

The Sacramento Bee: She refused to pay a $500 fee to her landlord. Her Sacramento property manager called the cops

Preview:

Carol Eckstrom dragged out a chair and staged a sit-in, just a few months after her stroke. In a way, she got what she asked for: The manager of her Sacramento mobile home park had finally hired contractors to fix the bulge in her walkway. But it would cost her $500. Eckstrom flatly disagreed that she should automatically have to pay $500 to her landlord to have the walkway fixed. She wanted time to find her own contractor. If sitting right on top of that trip hazard all day would stop the work from happening, that’s what she would do. Eckstrom is 73, a retired accountant with a tidy white bob. A complaint form she copied and saved shows...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The moral to this story is simple: stay far, far away from California if you want to be a landlord. Who in the world wants to mess with nonsense like this?

WBKO: Kentucky Gardens Mobile Home Park residents react to displacement post rezone approval

Preview:

Our thoughts on this story:

This time it’s a city itself that is tearing down the mobile home park to make way for a better use of the land. And the residents are mad because the city is going to displace 30 tenants to make way for 300 more housing units.

"Residents of the park have described the morale as “depressing” since the approval.“There is a community based here. They showed that they are going to make places so that people can have more places to live, but what about here? There are over 70 residents here. We are all getting kicked out on the street and that is not right,” said Amanda Mitchell, a resident who has lived at the park for 20 years."

It looks like the 800-pound gorilla in the room nationwide is that park owners simply tear down and redevelop when the mobile home park is no longer the highest and best use of the land. That means residents need to embrace rent increases and follow the rules because the alternative is homelessness. It’s that simple. Even cities – in this case -- are following this mantra.

WTVG: Residents at a Wauseon mobile home park gear up for class-action lawsuit

Preview:

WAUSEON, Ohio (WTVG) - Skyrocketing water and rent prices have residents at a senior-living mobile home park in Wauseon gearing up for a class-action lawsuit.

“We’ll make it, ‘cause we always have, but it’s far,” Sue Boysel, who lives at Buckeye Estates said. “It’s not fair to so many other people in the park.”

Over the past year and a half, the Boysels say rent at Buckeye Estates Mobile Home Park has more than doubled.

“$242, right now, we’re paying $370,” Harold Boysel said. “And they want to take it up to 650.”

Rent isn’t the only thing that’s increasing and Sue and Harold’s daughter, Teresa Hartsock, say’s it’s taking a toll on the...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

It’s not hard to find an attorney to file almost anything if you’ll pay their hourly rate, but I sense the residents will have some challenges with their class-action dream namely because 1) Ohio has no rent control 2) Ohio has no rent control and 3) did I mention that Ohio has no rent control? Kind of hard to overcome that one issue when your lawsuit is about the owner raising rent.

But I can bet you that the owners of this park are probably meeting this weekend with some land developers to get the current value per square foot – wouldn’t you? If the residents are the catalyst for that redevelopment then they have nobody to blame but themselves.

NH Business Review: Manufactured-home park in North Conway purchased by residents

Preview:

Homeowners in the Mt. Washington Valley Mobile Home Village recently purchased their 32-unit park, making it New Hampshire’s 147th resident-owned manufactured-home community (ROC), according to a press release from the NH Community Loan Fund.

With training and technical assistance from the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund’s ROC-NH program, residents organized and formed Mt. Washington Valley Cooperative this past January after being notified that park owners Sally Brassill and Odd-Aage Bersvendsen had received an offer to sell.

The cooperative matched the offer and bought their community for $1,800,000 with financing from the Community...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I have no problem with the concept of residents buying parks – we’ve sold several to the residents – but let’s all agree that 32 lots is not exactly changing the direction of the earth as many of these “resident-owned” articles like to suggest.

KOMU 8: Moberly mobile home park residents scramble to find a new home

Preview:

MOBERLY − Residents at Sarbaum Mobile Home Park in Moberly are feeling the pressure and scrambling to get things figured out as the property's closing date is quickly approaching. 

Becky Bradds has lived on the property for 26 years and said the process has gone as bad as it could have gotten. 

"I am very unraveled about it. I've been here for 26 years. This is my home, I haven't had another home. The fact that I can't get a hold of [the owner] even when we needed to for different reasons," Bradds claimed. "He's been very hard to contact."

Sarbaum Mobile Home Park owner Mike Baker notified residents in April of an Aug. 10 closure. Baker...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Same old story. Residents won’t behave and pay rent and the end result is redevelopment.

“Sarbaum Mobile Home Park owner Mike Baker notified residents in April of an Aug. 10 closure. Baker wrote to residents that he was "no longer able to meet the park's operating expenses" due to late payments and expensive repairs to its 60-plus-year-old sewer system.”

Some mobile home park residents take for granted that they are guaranteed an on-going place to live no matter what they do. This should serve as a lesson to these folks that they are fully accountable for their actions and you can’t push park owners around and not expect to get a park closure notice. Land is too valuable and park owners all have limits to their patience.

Realtor: Luxury Manufactured Home in Calabasas for $749K Will Knock Your Socks Off

Preview:

When you think of a mobile home, an image probably comes to mind.

However, this delightful manufactured home in Calabasas, CA, doesn’t fit the typical idea of a prefab property, not by a long shot.

“When I walked in, it wasn’t just turnkey. It was, ‘Give me the key,’” says Jordan Reid, marketing director for Mobile Homes Malibu, which lists manufactured homes for sale in the area. “It’s one of those properties that you can see the owner paid such close attention to detail in virtually every single room.”

Ren Smith and Olivia Riley with Coldwell Banker Realty are co-listing the property for $749,000.

That is a fraction of the price you’d...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Let’s see … $750,000 for a 1,700 doublewide works out to $441 per square foot. For a mobile home. In a world in which you can buy a really nice stick-built in many markets for half that amount. The only thing that knocks my socks off in this article is how stupid anyone would be to pay that much for an old doublewide. Come out to Missouri and we can get you an identical dwelling for about $50,000 on a lakeside lot, and you can put the rest in the bank at 5% and live off the interest.

The Northern Light: City council reaffirms six-month manufactured home park moratorium

Preview:

Blaine City Council voted 5-2 during its July 10 meeting to uphold its decision to enact a six-month emergency moratorium on processing manufactured home park building permit applications. Over 20 people spoke during a public hearing before the vote while others brimmed the council chambers to listen. 

City council approved the moratorium May 22 to allow time for city staff to clean up code inconsistencies. The underlying zoning code allows for manufactured home parks but the planned unit development (PUD) code does not. Manufactured home parks that are five acres or larger are required to be developed as PUDs.

Blaine city code only...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is a tough situation for the City of Blaine. They thought they had all mobile home parks effectively banned from being built in the city and suddenly it turns out the zoning department screwed up. A developer found the loophole and now the city is freaking out and trying to stop the developer with a moratorium. “City council approved the moratorium May 22 to allow time for city staff to clean up code inconsistencies. The underlying zoning code allows for manufactured home parks but the planned unit development (PUD) code does not. Manufactured home parks that are five acres or larger are required to be developed as PUDs.”

How will this turn out? The developer has pledged to sue the city if it denies his permit. The city is basically doomed as you can’t legally do what they’re doing. It’s like a plane with a broken landing gear and no matter how long you delay it, it’s still going to crash.

The Sporis Sun: New state loan, grant program could aid in area efforts to secure resident ownership for mobile home parks

Preview:

A new state loan program could help solve another part of the complex equation for Colorado mobile home park resident groups that are looking to secure their long-term housing future, including various local efforts.

Last month, Gov. Jared Polis announced the new Mobile Home Park Resident Empowerment Program, which will provide $28 million in loans across the state to help facilitate resident ownership of parks whose landlords are willing to sell.

Overseen by the Colorado Department of Local Affairs Division of Housing/Office of Housing Finance and Sustainability, the Mobile Home Park Acquisition Fund will have three loan administrators,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

No offense but given the current values of mobile home parks in Colorado – typically around $100,000 per lot – means the $28 million the state has allocated to this program will only cover about 280 lots (there are single parks bigger than that). 

Auto Evolution: Not So Tiny, Still Mobile: Mobi Individual Peach Is a Tiny House With a Rooftop Terrace

Preview:

Mobile homes are a lot of great things, but they're also very compact, which means they could never afford the same comfort or features of a brick-and-mortar home. One way to sidestep spatial limitations while still keeping the unit road legal is to build upwards.
 
A mobile home has to stay mobile because, otherwise, what good is it for? The reasons people opt for a tiny home range from the desire to travel more to the need to cut down expenses and any combination of any other reasons you can think of between these two. In many ways, tiny houses are perfect, but they're also very restrictive because of their compact size.

This is where...
Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I admit that these homes look really cool but they violate the ordinances of almost every city in the U.S. Why? Because they don’t have HUD seals. And that’s why they look really cool. When you make them HUD compliant, they look like a shoe box. One day, maybe the law will be changed. But don’t hold your breath. Until then, they won’t work in parks.