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The Post-Journal: CHRIC Offers Repair Programs For Owner-Occupied Homes

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Our region has some of the oldest housing stock in the state of New York. According to the 2022-2024 Chautauqua County Community Health Assessment and Community Health Improvement Plan (https://chqgov.com/sites/default/files/document-files/2023-01/CHQ.CHA–.2022.Final–.pdf), “Housing structures in the County are relatively old with 40.5% built in 1939 or earlier, compared to 31.0% in New York State. In Chautauqua County, 52.7% of homes were built prior to 1950, compared to 32.3% in New York State”. These homes might have been great when folks were younger, but as we age, they may need some work done to maintain the home or improve the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is a really good idea offered by the State of New York to mobile home owners:

If an elderly resident has to move to a nursing home, it can cost the state $400 per day. By making the mobile home handicap accessible, it saves them a ton of money. This is a sensible win/win scenario. I’m a big fan of government making smart decisions – it’s just that they do it so rarely.

If an elderly resident has to move to a nursing home, it can cost the state $400 per day. By making the mobile home handicap accessible, it saves them a ton of money. This is a sensible win/win scenario. I’m a big fan of government making smart decisions – it’s just that they do it so rarely.

vtdigger: ‘Not going to live here again’: Vermont manufactured-home residents return to destruction

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Hattie Wood had been through floods at the Berlin Mobile Home Park before. The first arrived during her first spring in the park, almost 30 years ago. It ruined her family’s shed but didn’t reach their home. In 2011, Tropical Storm Irene brought water up to the base of the residence, but again it was spared.

This time, “it took everything,” Wood said on Thursday afternoon, as she returned home for the first time since Vermont’s historic flooding overtook the park earlier this week.

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Our thoughts on this story:

This writer thinks they have it all figured out when it comes to why mobile homes in Vermont got flooded the other day – in the same storm that flooded their own capitol. “A large share sit on floodplains. Many parks have aging water and electrical systems that are more at risk of failing when hit by severe weather, and older homes built to outdated housing codes lack the physical integrity to withstand damage.”

Wow, that was really stupid on so many fronts. Yes, many mobile home parks have floodplain on some part of the property, but so does every other type of real estate (including the Capitol of Vermont apparently). Water and electrical systems do not fail in storms any more than any subdivision. And mobile homes have been built to the standards imposed and inspected by HUD (the Federal Government) since 1976.

The real reason that the mobile homes of Vermont flooded recently was simply that the entire state of Vermont flooded and those mobile homes just happened to be located in Vermont.

WFTV9: Apopka mobile home residents said they are being evicted for minor reasons

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ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. — The Farmworkers of America said it received several complaints about Chalet North evicting for minor infractions.

The mobile home park is along Alpine Drive, not far from Orange Blossom Trail.

Some residents feel the owners of Chalet North are taking advantage of them because they don’t understand the law.

A spokesperson for Chalet North said it only uses the eviction process, which is lengthy and costly, as a last resort.

Outside of Chalet North’s gates today, current and former residents protested the mobile home park’s management and what they said are unfair eviction practices.

Former resident Leticia Ramiraz...

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Our thoughts on this story:

First of all, NOBODY evicts for minor reasons. When you get rid of a paying tenant, you lose probably $10,000+ by the time you get that lot re-filled. I don’t know the facts, but I know from experience that eviction is the last straw available when the resident refuses to pay rent or follow the rules. And it sounds like the owner is at that point with these few tenants. Note that the attorney for the residents admits that the owner has done nothing legally wrong – so then what’s the issue here? If you’re a woke journalist who lives in a tiny apartment in Manhattan and doesn’t own anything, then you have zero idea of how business works. In the real world, you have to do unpleasant things when you’re a landlord, which includes firing employees and, in this case, evicting tenants.

New York Post: ‘Shark Tank’ star Barbara Corcoran shows off $1M mobile home: ‘It’s my Taj Mahal’

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“Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran — long known as a successful business executive — shocked fans when she took viewers inside her mobile home. Yes, her mobile home.

In a TikTok video posted by Caleb Simpson, the creator known to document a host of celebrity houses, Corcoran is seen giving a tour of her humble West Coast pad in affluent Pacific Palisades. The video has already amassed over 5.5 million views.

“Who would have thought Barbara Corcoran would have her own trailer,” Simpson said in the video.

“It’s a called a double-wide,” Corcoran, 74, quipped in response. “Here’s my Taj Mahal,” she added, explaining that she paid $800,000 for...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Well, if you thought she had any investing acumen, now you know better. Anyone who would spend $1 million on a mobile home that you don’t own the land underneath – whether it’s in Malibu or Timbuktu – is a certified idiot. My bet is that she released this video because somebody found out she lived in a “trailer park” and was about to sell the story to the National Enquirer so she decided to get a jump on that article. I watched this video and thought “wow, that’s embarrassing”. Not sure who would think otherwise.

Auto Evolution: Not So Tiny, Still Mobile: Mobi Individual Peach Is a Tiny House With a Rooftop Terrace

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Mobile homes are a lot of great things, but they're also very compact, which means they could never afford the same comfort or features of a brick-and-mortar home. One way to sidestep spatial limitations while still keeping the unit road legal is to build upwards.
 
A mobile home has to stay mobile because, otherwise, what good is it for? The reasons people opt for a tiny home range from the desire to travel more to the need to cut down expenses and any combination of any other reasons you can think of between these two. In many ways, tiny houses are perfect, but they're also very restrictive because of their compact size.

This is where...
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Our thoughts on this story:

I admit that these homes look really cool but they violate the ordinances of almost every city in the U.S. Why? Because they don’t have HUD seals. And that’s why they look really cool. When you make them HUD compliant, they look like a shoe box. One day, maybe the law will be changed. But don’t hold your breath. Until then, they won’t work in parks.

FOX 28: Ohio lawmakers ban rent control months before tenants form picket lines to demand regulation

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (WSYX) — Desperate renters in Lancaster are calling on Ohio lawmakers for change and control when it comes to increasing and unaffordable rent.

"Look at this outside of your ivory tower," Dan Wykle told ABC6 On Your Side Problem Solvers after forming a tenants' organization at Colonial Estates Mobile Home Park and registering it with the state. "Understand there are people out here who are hurting bad."

Wykle has organized a series of protests in front of his Lancaster mobile home park since June after he said park owners continue to increase lot rent. He said many of his organization members are seniors and on fixed...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And here’s the winner of “Most Misguided Attempt at Social Engineering of 2023”. Despite there being no rent control in Ohio a resident named Wykle has “organized a series of protests in front of his Lancaster mobile home park since June after he said park owners continue to increase lot rent”.

I hope he has a lot of sunscreen.

The Mount Airy News: Mobile home renters feel stuck in bad situations

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Mount Airy and Surry County officials agree that there is a housing shortage in this area, but solutions are as hard to come by as a house for rent.

Some residents of mobile home parks say they feel stuck in bad rental situations that are not safe or healthy because they lack any other options which keeps them locked in place. With so few options to rent, and prices that quite frankly are not possible for some folks to afford, some residents of these parks say the situation is making them sick emotionally and in some cases physically as well.

The North Carolina Department of Justice advises, “If the landlord fails to fix something that...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And we have another winner: “The Worst Strategy Decision of 2023”. After acknowledging the complete absence of available rental properties, these few renters are harassing the park owner with nonsense suits on everything from mold to energy efficiency. What do you imagine that’s going to accomplish? Let me guess – the park owner gets out of the rental business and sells these units off, rendering these folks homeless. Smart move.

Northern California Public Media: Petaluma strengthens rent control for mobile home dwellers

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Residents of Petaluma trailer parks gained more safeguards this week, as the city council there became the latest in Sonoma County to strengthen rent controls at mobile home parks. 

The unanimous vote largely makes permanent rules hastily enacted more than a month ago, as park owners sought rent increases amidst nationwide inflation. Until May, rent increases were limited to 6 percent or 100 percent of the increase of the consumer price index, whichever is less.

Now a maximum of 4 percent or seventy percent of the CPI, whichever is less, Monday night's vote made that permanent.

The new rules are largely in line with ones adopted in Santa...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And another winner: “The Best Quotes of 2023”. Here’s what a resident and park owner said after the city voted to put into effect even more rent control in this California town:


Calling the council's direction misguided, resident Salo Landano claimed rent control efforts always fail. "It never works and it always leads to lower housing stock and poorer living conditions."


Park owner Nick Ubaldi says he's considering drastic measures. "We are currently managing properties with aging infrastructure while dealing with escalating expenses, however, it seems that the decision to impose additional restrictions on rent increases, keeping them below C.P.I. will have unintended consequences. As I'm sure you're aware of, we have hired a consultant to assess the feasibility of closing our mobile home park. We believe this to be our only viable course of action. We are concerned that if not addressed, these changes will suffocate our business and render our property virtually worthless."


Bravo!

Jefferson Public Radio: Over $40 million in state funding for three affordable housing projects in Phoenix

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Three affordable housing projects in Phoenix will receive a total of $40 million in state funding. It was approved by a state housing council last week. It’s an attempt to make a dent in the dramatic housing shortage in the Rogue Valley.

The Royal Oaks Mobile Manor manufactured home park burned down in the 2020 Almeda Fire. But a series of new modular homes being installed there were recently found to be uninhabitable after construction defects were discovered.

Oregon Housing and Community Services says a new $11 million allotment in funding for the project is meant solely for repaying a bridge loan used to purchase the site and...

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Our thoughts on this story:

“The Royal Oaks Mobile Manor manufactured home park burned down in the 2020 Almeda Fire. But a series of new modular homes being installed there were recently found to be uninhabitable after construction defects were discovered.”

After you read that quote, it’s hard to be impressed with the two apartment complexes the City of Phoenix is building – you can’t stop wondering how much money they squandered trying to fill the mobile home park with modular homes that turned out to be uninhabitable. Think they’ll ever discuss how much money was lost and which city official was held accountable for this mess? Yeah, right.

The Islander Classifieds: Homes go on the market at Pines park

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The “For Sale” sign is a sign of the times at the Pines Trailer Park in Bradenton Beach.

Some owners are putting their homes up for sale after the ownership of the park, 103 Church Ave., Bradenton Beach, delivered notice May 8 of an offer from an unknown entity to purchase the park land.

The notice, prepared by attorney David A. Luczak, representing park owners, stated the Jackson Partnership was considering an offer outlining a purchase price of $16,250,000 for all park-owned land, mobile homes, recreational vehicles, equipment, materials, vehicles and buildings.

The notice said closing would come 45 days from the successful completion...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And we have another winner: “The WORST TIMING of 2023”. The park is being sold for $16 million to be redeveloped. That means the homes have to move out. In light of all of this, six residents of the park – with ancient homes that look to be pre-HUD – are wanting to sell them for up to $189,000 each. Here’s the problem I guess the residents don’t understand. The homes were only worth that much because they offered cheap living in a beach town in Florida. The location is what people were buying, and not the homes. Now these homes will only bring maybe $10,000 since they have to leave the property. They should have sold them before the park closure was announced.

Yahoo News: David vs. Goliath: the battle between mobile home residents and out-of-state investors

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It’s easy to miss the entrance to manufactured home communities if you don’t live there. Tucked away from view, these enclaves, sometimes called trailer parks, offer housing for very low-income folks, with monthly costs averaging $564, half the $1,046 for apartments, according to City Lab.

There are more than 13,000 of these homes in Thurston County, about 11% of our housing stock, according to Thurston Regional Planning Council data. Nationwide, an estimated 17.7 million people live in manufactured homes. That’s a lot of folks, of whom 70% are very low-income senior citizens. And many of these homes are at risk.

The vulnerability of...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Yes, we have a winner. “The Wokest Article OF 2023”. It not only takes the regular nonsense and expands on it, but it actually has a new woke angle not seen before: the reason mobile homes look bad is that evil manufacturers classify mobile homes as cars and therefore banks won’t fund home improvements that the residents are desperate to do which is clearly ridiculous. There is no battle between 99% of mobile home residents and out-of-state investors. There IS a battle between the 1% that want the parks to remain dumps at low rents and with the infrastructure failing. If these type of woke journalists want to really help those few mobile home park residents that don’t like living in a civilized society, then they should let them move in and sleep on their sofas.

Crozet Gazette: Crozet Mobile Home Community Expansion Plan Advances

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The Albemarle County Planning Commission recommended approval of a Special Use Permit request for the new owner of the renamed Crozet Mobile Home Community (MHC) at the commission’s June 27 meeting. The mobile home park on Park Road just east of Crozet Park has existed in that location continuously for over 40 years, predating most of the development around it. The 15-acre community currently hosts 73 manufactured homes, and the parcel’s new owners—who acquired the MHC in 2022 for $4 million—would like to add 14 more units to the site.

County senior planner Kevin McCollum explained that because the mobile home park was established before...

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Our thoughts on this story:

How can you justify spending $2 million just for the sidewalks on a 14-lot expansion? That’s over $100,000 per lot just for the sidewalk cost the city is demanding. I’m afraid on lost on this concept. 

CBS Colorado: Residents of an Arapahoe County mobile home park claim their management company is "taking advantage," not treating them "like human beings"

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A Colorado state agency confirms to CBS News Colorado it is investigating complaints of unfair and exploitative practices at a mobile home park in Arapahoe County. 

Activists claim the alleged issues there are an example of a problematic trend happening to mobile home parks across the country. They say large private equity companies are buying up mobile home parks, raising rent prices, and implementing costly policies, which they say take advantage of the people who live there, and critics say the same is happening at Foxridge Farm in northeastern Aurora. 

Residents say some people at Foxridge Farm are having to pay up to $3,800 a month...

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Our thoughts on this story:

When an article starts off with “activists claim the alleged issues there are an example of a problematic trend happening to mobile home parks across the country. They say large private equity companies are buying up mobile home parks, raising rent prices, and implementing costly policies, which they say take advantage of the people who live there” you know it’s yet another woke article by a biased journalist and based on commentary from one or two residents that are usually behind on their rent or in trouble for rules violations.

The truth is that private equity groups are the good guys that are bringing old parks back to life. Without them a number would be closing. As part of resuscitating old parks, they are, of course, raising rents and being more rigid on rules (such as parking in this case) and that makes 10% of the residents mad – the very residents that ruin the quality of life for every else in the community. 90% of the residents share none of these complaints but are too good natured to say that those complaining neighbors are nuts.

It reminds me of when Steve Jobs moved Apple out of his parents’ garage and into real office space. Some of the workers said “I want to go back to the garage – it was way better”. But 99% of the workers at Apple did not agree, including Steve Jobs. Those that could not handle reality land were free to quit and go sit in their own garages.

WBTV: Rowan Co. mobile home park owner limits water access to 3 hours daily

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ROWAN COUNTY, N.C. (WBTV) - A group of families in a mobile home park in Rowan County reached out to WBTV after their running water was restricted by the landlord to only three hours a day.

The landlord says there’s a leak and that until it can be located and fixed, they have to limit the water to more than a dozen homes. It’s been going on for a month now, and they want answers and water.

The taps and the spigots are dry at the Mobile Manor off Hartley Road, except for certain times of day.

“7 in the morning to 8:30, then it’s cut off the rest of the day until 7 to 8:30 at night,” resident Brandy Brewer said.

It’s been that way for a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

16 trailers and the well has gone bad? That’s why you never buy a park this small with private utilities. The owners should be discussing a listing price for the raw land as soon as possible. The tenants have no idea that they are basically signing their own real estate death warrant, and the journalist is the idiot that’s lighting the match on the funeral pyre.

The Tribune: Morro Bay rent control ordinance protects some tenants, but not others. Here’s how it works

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Christy Nair waves to neighbors as she strolls to her house perched on the edge of Silver City West, a 55-and-up mobile home and recreational vehicle park in Morro Bay. As she opens the front door, her 13-year-old pug, Duke, skips from a sunny spot on the sofa to the door — wagging his tail in anticipation of treats or head scratches. Nair, a retiree, has called Silver City West home for the past 11 years — but she worries about difficulties others may face when they choose to rent there or at other mobile home parks in the city.

About three years ago, Nair discovered black mold in the home she originally purchased at Silver City West,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The rapper 50-Cent said it all earlier this week when he said that California is going down for the count. If I owned this park I would sell the land and bulldoze it rather than to comply with these idiotic rent control ordinances and tenants that have a “victim” mentality and can’t do anything for themselves with a pandering state government that eggs them on. You watch, this park will be an apartment complex in three years.

The Colorado Sun: Tiny homes starting to be a big-deal solution for people priced out of Colorado’s housing market

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LONGMONT — The popular tiny home movement is growing bigger in Colorado thanks to a new law aimed at allowing factory-built homes of about 400 square feet or less to become permanent fixtures in neighborhoods and in one case, to be used as an emerging therapy to get homeless military veterans back on their feet.

Advocates say House Bill 1242 , which went into effect July 1, will spur more purchases since it sets building standards for the scaled-down structures. The new rules also allow cities and counties to create legal pathways to let people live in tiny homes for a lifetime as opposed to just 180 days, advocates say. 

“Before this...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, I called this a few years ago. Yes, tiny homes will one day be allowed in all parks nationwide because, just like Uber, it’s what people want even if it’s not technically legal. If they could repeal prohibition, they can certainly open the doors to tiny homes over time.

The U.S. Sun: I lived in a dream tiny home for $280 a month for 9 years – but new laws saw me suddenly evicted & almost left homeless

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A TINY home dweller has narrowly avoided homelessness after she was evicted from the property where she had lived for nine years.

Back in 2017, Yvonne Perrigo and her retired mother were living at the Skyview Trailer Park in Missoula, Montana, when the landlord left a note saying they needed to leave within six months.

There were plans to raze the park and build a new affordable apartment complex.

That's when Perrigo had to begin the painstaking and financially taxing process of moving her mobile home to another trailer park, the Missoulian reported.

"It was one of the roughest times I’ve ever had," she told the outlet.

"We were seriously...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s where I get confused on articles like this. She says she has a full-time job with the same company for the past 17 years. Her only obligation is a $280 per month lot rent. Yet she says “I live paycheck to paycheck”. So even if it took you 17 years to work up to minimum wage, you’d earn at least $20,000 per year. $280 per month represents 17% of your income. I’m sorry but I just don’t buy it.

JCHS Harvard University: COMPARING THE COSTS OF MANUFACTURED AND SITE-BUILT HOUSING

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Across the US, homeownership is becoming increasingly inaccessible for low- and moderate-income households. While land costs are a driving force in this trend, construction costs carry some of the blame as well. However, “Comparison of the Costs of Manufactured and Site-Built Housing,” a new paper I co-authored with Chris Herbert and James Shen finds that manufactured housing offers a potential solution to rising construction costs, with a significant cost advantage over site-built homes. Given this cost advantage, we suggest that housing advocates and policymakers take steps to promote more widespread adoption of manufactured housing as...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The most important revelation of this article is that Harvard University is now researching the “trailer” industry. Sadly, this article is not up to Ivy-League standards. I’m sorry, but if CrossMod (the new mobile home/modular concept) is only 27% cheaper than stick built, it’s never going to sell. Most people have a stigma against mobile homes that is far bigger than just 27%. If CrossMod was maybe 50% less, it might have a chance, but I’m still not even convinced then. 

Union-Bulletin: Walla Walla seniors to share housing challenges at upcoming listening sessions

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Walla Walla seniors facing rising rents in manufactured housing communities and apartments have an opportunity to share their plight with state lawmakers this week.

Rental costs — including lot rent and utility fees for water, sewer and stormwater passed through by management — increased by $193 over 22 months at Rancho Villa, a manufactured home community for those 55 and older in Walla Walla.

Mobile and manufactured home residents from Rancho Villa and retirees living in other rental properties around Walla Walla shared their financial challenges at a community town hall in March, asking state lawmakers to help by implementing rent...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Don’t you love it when politicians hold public forums? It’s absolutely meaningless but makes people feel like they’re being heard. Instead, decision makers are making tiny notes of grocery items and daydreaming about golf adventures while nodding sporadically to pretend like they’re really concerned. “Walla Walla Rep. Mark Klicker, the ranking Republican on the House Housing Committee, will host the sessions along with assistant ranking member Republican Rep. April Connors and a housing policy staffer. "Basically, it’s a listening session to get some ideas to find solutions to both the rental market and mobile home parks to curtail the rapid rate increases," Klicker said in a statement.” The odds that these forums will change anyone’s vote is somewhere around .00000001%.

Florida Politics: Rexmere Village to expand attainable luxury living in Davie

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Thanks to legislation recognizing manufactured homes as affordable housing, new options are on the way.

After legislative action recognizing manufactured housing as part of the state’s affordable housing strategy, an existing community in South Florida has taken steps to add more attainable housing, providing luxury not typical of the price points planned.

Rexmere Village in Davie is planning to add up to 75 single family homes, with new four-bedroom homes priced at less than $200,000.

Rexmere filed an application in late May with the town of Davie to begin the project, named The Reserve at Rexmere. The luxury manufactured homes will be...

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Our thoughts on this story:

What kind of goofball pays $200,000 for a mobile home? Move to Missouri and you can get a brick house in a good school district for less money. And what’s with the use of the name “Reserve” on just about every housing project in Florida? Reserve is defined as “a supply of a commodity not needed for immediate use” – which basically means it’s something that nobody currently needs. How is that a positive in a development name?

Delaware Public Media: With notable exceptions, housing legislation largely falters in General Assembly

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Relatively few affordable housing-oriented bills cleared the General Assembly this year, albeit with a high-profile exception.

In early June, housing justice organizations celebrated passage of a bill guaranteeing most tenants a right to legal representation during eviction proceedings — a version of a bill that failed in a dramatic midnight vote at the end of the 2022 legislative session.

And last week, Gov. Carney quietly signed legislation enabling counties to use realty transfer tax revenue to fund affordable housing projects, opening the possibility that Sussex County could use a portion of its substantial revenues from pandemic-era...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If Delaware passes a bill that bans evicting residents for criminal behavior and provides every resident a free attorney when an eviction is filed against them then they may go to the top of my list of dumbest states. Pathetic.

Route Fifty: Investors are buying mobile home parks. Residents and governments are pushing back.

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In 2021, a California-based investor group purchased Golden Hill Mobile Home Park in Golden, Colorado, a small city just outside Denver in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Less than two years later, rents doubled for the nearly 40 households that called the community home, pushing residents—some that had lived there for decades—to seek cheaper alternatives in an area already feeling the pressure of an affordable housing crisis. 

But this week, residents of the Golden Hills community got some good news: They are now the owners of the land their homes sit on, thanks in part to a 2020 state law that gave them the opportunity to purchase...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Blah, blah, blah … park owners are evil, residents are angels and the only way to save the world is for the residents to buy the parks they live in. These types of stupid narratives are what is causing an acceleration of parks being redeveloped into apartments and Home Depot stores. Why would anyone want to own a park in California and put up with these crackpots? I sure wouldn’t. 

The New York Times: Community Land Trusts Are Working to Create New Homeowners

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By the end of Shekinah Samaya-Thomas’s first date with her now-husband Chris, she had made two things very clear: She was going to get married — not necessarily to him — and she was going to own a house.

For two people looking to establish a life together in the San Francisco Bay Area, getting married was the easy part. Buying a house was another story — both had experienced homelessness and Mr. Samaya-Thomas had no credit when the two first met. Housing prices in the East Bay continued to rise.

Claire Fahy is an editorial assistant based in New York who covers breaking news and general assignment stories.

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is a strange concept. People buy a house at a reduced price on a 99-year lease and you can’t sell the home except back to the Land Trust at a reduced price. And if you keep it for 99 years then they take it away from you. And this is accomplishing what exactly? Here’s a better idea. If you can’t afford a home and you are gainfully employed then you need to move to a part of America where homes are cheaper. Wages are pretty much the same throughout the U.S. in low-paying jobs, so artificially keeping people in areas they can’t afford without this subsidy creates generational poverty, right? I can never figure out why people live in New York City and San Francisco and all these other areas that they can’t afford without ever thinking “wow, if I picked up and moved to Topeka and made $30,000 per year I’d be set”.

12 News: 'We don’t have a place to go': Phoenix mobile home owners agree not to file evictions against 150 residents, for now

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PHOENIX — About 150 residents won’t be evicted from Weldon Court Mobile Home Park, which was scheduled to officially close on Friday.

The property owners “agreed to file no eviction actions against residents" still living at the property, the Community Legal Services attorneys told 12News late Tuesday.

“Between now and July 15, we hope to reach a final settlement,” a message sent out to tenants and provided to 12News by the organization read. “We continue to negotiate with the owners for additional  relocation assistance.”

The 50 families that remain living in their mobile homes had until June 30 to move out, after getting a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And here’s another story of a park being torn down for redevelopment. One of the residents in the article admonishes “we don’t have a place to go” – which means they can’t find anything as affordable. The moral is that residents should embrace higher rents because without them they are homeless. Would an extra $150 per month in lot rent have saved the day? We’ll never know. Nobody ever wants to accept this reality until the eviction notices go out.

The Fresno Bee: Fresno trailer park residents pleaded for city’s help. Now they fear becoming homeless

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Two years ago, residents of a north Fresno trailer park placed their hopes in local leaders to help them out of a bad situation.

Local leaders, namely the Fresno City Council and a Fresno Superior Court judge, only made things worse.

Today, roughly half as many people live in the former Trails End Mobile Home Park compared to before government “help” arrived. More than a dozen were evicted by new predatory landlords scheming to turn a quick profit off their plight. Those who remain also face eviction in less than a year, but not before being threatened with rent hikes and all sorts of unpleasantries in the meantime.

How did this happen?...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There are two lessons learned from this article:

  1. The residents should have paid their rent, not complained about increases, followed the rules, and Trails End might still be an ongoing mobile home park. Instead, the residents refused to pay or follow the rules, fought the owners every step of the way, and the fate of the park was sealed. The new owner made $2.4 million selling the land, but they might have hung in there and simply raised the rents if the residents had accepted the fact that the property owner held all the cards.
  2. Once again, the words “I’m from the government and I’m here to help” proved to be the scariest phrase in the English language. Just ask the residents of Trails End.