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The Cap Times: Mobile homes are affordable but some residents find serious downsides

Preview:

Gina began seeing problems with her mobile home the first week she moved into the Evergreen Village in Marshall — not just little repairs, but major issues like a furnace burning out and feet falling through the floors.

“No one should have moved into that home,” Gina, who didn’t want to share her full name for fear of retaliation from the property managers, told the Cap Times. “We’re basically living in squalor and nobody really does anything about it. Every day of my life, I hope to get out of here.”

Nine years ago, Gina was forced to leave her apartment in the village of Marshall 20 miles northeast of Madison when the building was sold....

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Our thoughts on this story:

This article is so dumb that it refutes its own argument only a few paragraphs earlier:

“This is not where we want to be right now. I'm sure you know how horrific the market is,” Gina said. “Even as high and as atrocious as the lot rent is, where in the hell in Dane County am I going to find a place to rent for $585 for three people? I'm not going to find that anywhere.”

Is then followed by:

(Mobile home parks) also come with a host of challenges: Property managers often are limited on budgets to provide anything other than minimal maintenance, and rents can be exploited by out-of-state investors to make money off of vulnerable populations.

So let me get this straight, the tenants state that they live in the park because the rent is ridiculously low and then are surprised that the owner can’t afford to keep the property up and then are even more shocked when new owners raise rents? That’s like someone checking into the Tiki Motor Court for $19 a night lodging and then calling down to the office and complaining that the furniture is old and there’s a light bulb burned out.

Here’s the solution. Raise the lot rents to a level that the park CAN afford to bring itself back to life and 99% of the residents will be very happy indeed (plus fend off the wrecking ball of new development). But not the tenants quoted in this article because they would be unhappy if the park gave them a million dollars and would respond “wait why not two million dollars you cheapskate out-of-state owner!”

One final note: what’s up with this new hatred of “out-of-state” owners? Virtually every hotel, restaurant, shopping center, apartment complex, self-storage facility and Walmart is owned by an entity that is “out-of-state”. Is that supposed to be an insult or a conspiracy theory? Because it’s just plain stupid.

LancsLive: Who is 'Gypsy billionaire' Alfie Best? The business mogul running mobile home parks across Lancashire

Preview:

He's been making headlines at the moment after a four-year planning dispute with South Ribble Borough Council. But who is the 'Gypsy billionaire' Alfie Best?

Dubbed the 'UK's richest Gypsy', Alfie Best is the chairman of Wyldecrest Parks, a mobile home company that he calls an "affordable housing crisis solution." In Lancashire alone, there are five of these parks in Heywood, Freckleton, Lancaster, Penwortham and Haslingden.

The entrepreneur has also invested in the hospitality and leisure sector, including Best Park Home Finance, Kyoto Clearance and Wylde Events. He's also set up the Wyldecrest Charitable Trust which supports residents...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Interesting the contrast between British and U.S. media. If this guy was in the U.S. he’d be attacked as “evil” for driving through a mobile home park in a $1 million Bugatti – but the British cherish the concept of eccentricity and see no problem with a successful person engaging in materialistic behavior. “Cheerio” park owners from across the ocean!

NBC 10 NEWS: Sen. Elizabeth Warren to visit mobile home park in Attleboro to discuss housing challenges

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(WJAR) — U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warran will visit a mobile home park in Attleboro on Wednesday to discuss the harmful effects of private equity on housing in Massachusetts.

She and other state leaders will tour Sandcastle Mobile Home Park on Wednesday morning.

In 2020, the I-Team's Tamara Sacharczyk spoke to residents of this mobile home park about rising rent costs and the push to bring back rent control.

Sandcastle Mobile Home Park is mainly populated by seniors on fixed incomes.

Currently, there's an effort to add a ballot question in Massachusetts to repeal the nearly 30-year ban on rent control.

Attleboro Mayor Cathleen DeSimone and...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The truth is that private equity groups have saved literally thousands of mobile home parks from the wrecking ball by buying old parks, pouring millions of dollars of capital into repairing and replacing aging infrastructure, and raising rents to levels that fend off redevelopment. The late Sam Zell was part of a “private equity group” when he ushered in the whole concept of bringing old parks back to life in the 1990s when nobody else would lift a finger to save them. Over a million residents of these “private equity group” parks have a nice place to live because of these visionaries, and 99.9% of these residents would say that they are thrilled by their new living standards.

CBS News Miami: Fort Lauderdale mobile home park residents ordered to leave, prompting anger and concern

Preview:

10/17/2023 UPDATE - This story has been updated with a statement from the mobile home park's property managers.

FORT LAUDERDALE -- Dozens of homeowners gathered Monday night pleading for help to stave off eviction at Pan American Estates Mobile Home Park in Fort Lauderdale after receiving notices to vacate the property.

Several residents who live in the 239 homes received letters informing them that they had to move heir single- or double-wide units out the park by April 22. 

The eviction letter said residents who are current with their rent for space to park their home in the park qualify for incentive payments. And those with a valid...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Clearly this is about more than a mobile home park shutting down for redevelopment:

"We're the ones that work everyday for other people," said Cristian Medina, another resident. "We do construction. We do roofing. We're the ones that do your painting and pressure cleaning. We do all the different type of work and for what? This is what we get back?"

This is a story about a property owner demolishing a mobile home park to make way for a more profitable use of the land. It happens in America every day, and I can drive up the Interstate and show you all types of property redevelopment in action. However, when it comes to mobile home parks this normal story turns into a weird narrative of the evil park owner taking advantage of the helpless resident and, in this case, it even takes on the tone of the UAW’s Shawn Fein wearing his “Eat the Rich” T-Shirt.

I have been saying for over a decade (and apparently nobody is listening) that the only way to keep these parks in operation is significantly higher lot rents. How high? High enough to make it a more profitable use of the land than the alternatives.

MSN: A Look Inside America's Most Expensive Trailer Park, Where a Mobile Home Costs $5.85 Million

Preview:

When one thinks of Malibu, visions of luxurious beachfront properties and sprawling mansions likely come to mind. However, nestled within this upscale coastal city lies a hidden gem — the Paradise Cove Mobile Home Park, which has gained notoriety for being the priciest trailer park in America.

With homes priced in the millions, this once humble residential area for fishermen and blue-collar workers has undergone a dramatic transformation, attracting wealthy buyers and celebrity residents alike. At the forefront of this trailer park's real estate market is a three-bedroom mobile home located at 247 Paradise Cove Road, currently listed at a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you spend $5.85 million for a 3/2 mobile home in a mobile home park the only word that really comes to mind is “stupid”. I have driven by these Malibu parks many times and trust me; they aren’t that great. The only argument you can make for paying millions of dollars to live in a 1980s mobile home in a “trailer park” is that the stick-built homes are $10 million. I think the better option is that, if you can’t afford a $10 million real home, you might be better off not living in Malibu at all. It reminds me of the old bumper sticker in the 1970s that people used to put on Ford Pintos that said “My Other Car Is A Rolls Royce”.

BDN: The big ideas from Maine lawmakers to ease the housing crisis

Preview:

Maine lawmakers will try to push zoning and tax changes, increased affordable housing production and more rent assistance through the State House in 2024.

Housing was among the major topics addressed on the list of nearly 300 bill titles proposed for next year’s legislative session. It was released Friday on the heels of a landmark state report that found Maine needs to construct at least 76,000 homes by 2030 to house its existing and future residents.

The contours of the debate will be familiar. A housing reform bill last year had to be watered down to get around concerns from municipalities. Similar changes proposed by Democrats could...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Didn’t really see any “big ideas” in this article. I’ve been to Maine and some of these ideas are not even as good as having L.L. Bean start knitting affordable homes in a number of attractive yarn colors – and with a lifetime guarantee.

MSN: Corporate landlords are snatching up mobile home parks and jacking up the rent — here’s why such cheap properties are so appealing to wealthy investors

Preview:

The hunt for yield has pushed private equity firms and professional investors into new segments of the real estate market.

In recent years, sophisticated investors have snapped up multi-family units and single-family homes. Now, corporate landlords are targeting the most cost-effective segment of the real estate market: mobile home parks.

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Our thoughts on this story:

This article was clearly written by AI as they got so many easy things wrong, such as crossing RV stats with mobile home stats (including using an RV photo on an MH article) and not knowing that Sam Zell is deceased. I can’t figure out if the point of the article is that mobile home parks are good or bad and, like most AI articles, neither did the computer that wrote it.

Sahan Journal: Energy efficiency work grows at Minnesota mobile home parks with large immigrant populations

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Small grants aimed at boosting energy efficiency in manufactured home parks are sprouting into an Xcel Energy pilot program that will insulate mobile homes in Maplewood and Faribault. 

Maplewood’s climate adaptation plan calls for the city to help energy burdened residents, which is defined as households paying more than 6 percent of their take home pay on energy bills. The city saw an opportunity to help residents at three large manufactured home parks. Previous outreach at those parks identified them as places with diverse demographics and lower household incomes, according to Shann Finwall, an environmental planner for the city of...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Now here’s a non-profit that actually is doing good on a shoestring budget. Mobile homes are very energy inefficient but it’s easily remedied with 1) thermal switch plate covers 2) caulking around windows 3) weather stripping front and back doors 4) making sure that skirting has no gaps and 5) putting shrink-wrapped plastic over windows. We think it might save $50 per month on some homes. We have been trying to inform our own residents of these easy fixes for years. It would be great if more people want to jump on the bandwagon.

Delaware Gov: Delaware State Housing Authority Shares Preview Of The 2023 Housing Needs Assessment Report

Preview:

Dover, Del. October 10, 2023 – Delawareans, including government officials, nonprofit and for-profit partners, and service providers, joined the Delaware State Housing Authority (DSHA) at POLYTECH Adult Education Center to hear preliminary findings from the 2023 Housing Needs Assessment report compiled by Root Policy Research. 

Key findings from the report include: 

  • Overall, 50% of renters in Delaware are cost-burdened, with 25,000 severely cost-burdened—paying more than 50% of their income in rent.
  • Since 2010, the homeownership rate has dropped for all age cohorts except seniors, with the most significant decline among ages 35 to 44,...
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Our thoughts on this story:

There are not that many mobile home parks in Delaware so this stat in the report was remarkable:

  • The composition of the state’s housing stock has changed little over time, with the most significant change being a 6,800 unit decrease in manufactured or mobile homes.

I guess Delaware has seen quite a lot of redevelopment where mobile home parks got torn down and made into other uses (probably apartments). But any way you cut it, that’s a lot of parks lost.

Oil City News: Mills City Council accepting public input tonight before final rezoning vote

Preview:

MILLS, Wyo. — People interested in commenting on a City of Mills proposed rezoning ordinance are invited to speak at a public hearing on Tuesday.

The Oct. 10 hearing regarding the Mills Downtown and River Front Corridor Commercial District rezoning is scheduled during the regular 7 p.m. Mills City Council meeting in the council chambers at Mills City Hall, 704 4th St.   

A downtown and riverfront district would run along the North Platte River and Wyoming Boulevard. 

Current uses of properties proposed for rezoning include single-family residences, mobile homes and a four-unit multi-family complex, plus several vacant parcels, according...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Why can’t they just be honest and admit that they want to kick the mobile home parks out?

Pine County News: Tiny home community in Pine City?

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With a shortage of suitable housing and skyrocketing home prices in the Pine City area, comes a new prospect for the city: tiny homes. 

The idea of a small/tiny home community has come to the city as part of the Community Action Plan put in place in 2022. As part of a forum, made possible by a Blandin Foundation grant, the city explored what a tiny home community might look like, current statistics on housing in the area and what would be necessary to move forward with such a venture.

Tiny Timbers – An agrihood community 

Small/tiny home developer, Melissa Jones, shared her and her husband’s vision and project, Tiny Timbers, which...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This property owner gets points for creating a new word to help avoid the “trailer park” designation:

“An agrihood community”

Not sure if the variance will pass, but they should definitely get an award for creativity.

KTVU: Petaluma mobile home park residents facing 300% rent increase

Preview:

PETALUMA, Calif. - Residents of Little Woods Mobile Villa in Petaluma fear they may be homeless after receiving notices that their monthly rent would more than triple come next year.

The mobile home park on Lakeville Highway has nearly 80 occupied spaces where some residents have lived for decades.

Earlier this week, several neighbors received a packet of paperwork notifying them rent would increase by 300% or more.

"That’s outrageous," said resident Darrell Pike. "This is greed, pure greed."

 

Pike said his notice shows his $500 monthly rent would increase by 343% or more than $1,700. That would bring the total to more than $2,215 a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, let’s cut through the B.S. and get straight to the truth:

  1. Petaluma housing costs $839,600 for a house and $3,850 per month for an apartment. So a lot rent of $2,215 per month is actually insanely cheap.
  2. If you are on a strict budget then you should never even think of retiring in Petaluma. That was a really bad choice.
  3. The City of Petaluma set all of this in motion when they stupidly decided to pass rent control which then forced all property owners to raise rents as high as they could before future increases were capped. "As property owners, we’re seeking a fair market rent or considering closing the business before we are forced out," owner Nick Ubaldi said in a statement. The City of Petaluma passed an updated ordinance earlier this year that capped the annual rent increases allowed by mobile home parks. The intention was to strengthen protections for renters, however, it has resulted in threats of closure in July at two parks, including Little Woods.
  4. The property owner will most certainly redevelop this land if it can’t command fair rents.

So who is the real culprit in this story? The City of Petaluma. And the resident who thought that this was a good place to live on a limited budget. If I went to an expensive steakhouse with $10 in my pocket, I would be accused of being out of my mind not receiving any empathy from anyone.

The Daily World: Attorney general proposes rent refunds at mobile home park

Preview:

A recent letter from the Washington State Office of the Attorney General called on the owner of Leisure Manor Mobile Home Park in South Aberdeen to refund tenants for recent increases in rent and fees after finding some increases violated state law.

The letter, dated Oct. 3, spells out preliminary findings of the Attorney General’s office investigation into complaints from Leisure Manor tenants about new rules and business practices of Port Orchard-based Hurst and Son LLC, which owns dozens of mobile home parks across the Northwest, including the one in South Aberdeen.

It gives Hurst and Son until Oct. 17 to either contest or concur with...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Easy conclusion: any place with the name “Washington” – either on the west or east coast – should be avoided.

WFLA: ‘Devastating’: Seniors frustrated by another lot rent increase at Lakeland mobile home park

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LAKELAND, Fla. (WFLA) — Deborah Dicus has lived at Holiday Mobile Home Park since 2012. Her neighbors are considered family. She feels she has to leave after being hit with another lot rent increase at the park.

“It’s like leaving the family I built here,” she said.

Holiday Mobile Home Park is a 55+ retirement community. Most residents own their mobile homes but rent their lots from the park’s owner.

 

Dicus said when she first moved in, her rent was $325 a month. Come January, it will be $767. Her social security check is $900 a month.

“I’ve been trying to sell my place way under market value and when they hear the lot rent, they just go...

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Our thoughts on this story:

First, let’s review the math.

LAKELAND, Fla. (WFLA) — Deborah Dicus has lived at Holiday Mobile Home Park since 2012. Dicus said when she first moved in, her rent was $325 a month. Come January, it will be $767. Her social security check is $900 a month.

Over 11 years, the increase in rent from $325 per month to $767 equates to 10% per year. That’s pretty much in-line with most all of her other costs including gasoline, utilities, insurance – basically everything. So clearly you can’t complain that the park owner is “gouging” the rent.

The bigger issue is that – for some unexplained reason – while every other good and service in America has inflated at the same rate, only the mobile home park is singled out as the lone bill that ruins Deborah’s life.

The reality is that you can’t possibly live in Florida on a $900 per month social security check. Perhaps she has a pension or other retirement funds, but the fact is that Florida was a really poor retirement choice. If she lived in Missouri, for example, she could easily get by on a $900 per month check, as rural Missouri lot rents are maybe $250 per month.

So this is really a story about how expensive Florida is as a state coupled with how social security is not sufficient to retire on unless you made really good decisions on how and where to live in retirement.

News 4 JAX: Councilmembers: Clock is ticking for Westside mobile home park owners in outrageous water bill dispute

Preview:

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – The owners of a Westside mobile home park have four more days to explain to city inspectors why they’re charging some tenants thousands of dollars a month for water or they could face consequences.

City Council members held a public meeting on Monday about Moore Enterprises which owns Three Seasons Mobile Home Village on Collins Road.

Similar complaints were lodged against Moore Enterprises at a property they manage outside of Columbus Ohio.

Jacksonville City Council President Ron Salem, District 14 Councilman Rahman Johnson and City Council At-Large member Matt Carlucci said they are hoping this issue gets resolved...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I know nothing about this case or this park but I do know that having a tenant run up $1,000 per month in water is certainly not outrageous. All a resident has to do is fill up a commercial water tank on a work trailer every night (landscaper, paving, construction, mobile car wash) and you can easily exceed $1,000 per month. So let’s stop the theatrics.

INDY Week: Families Living in Cary’s Chatham Estates Mobile Home Park Fear Displacement

Preview:

On a Friday afternoon at a mobile home park in Cary, dozens of children spill from a beeping yellow school bus, skipping up to meet their parents who are huddled around an intersection.

An elementary schooler in a pastel pink sweater and purple backpack runs to her mother who greets her with a warm hug and a kiss on the forehead. A middle schooler walks past them to the parking lot where his dad waits with the car. 

It’s a scene that plays out in suburban neighborhoods across Cary. But here at Chatham Estates mobile home park, the daily routine may soon come to an end if, following an impending sale, the community is broken up and...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Can you get any more hypocritical? The old owner is getting offered over $1 million per acre for his land. His current rents don’t justify anywhere near that figure as a mobile home park. He summed it up for the reporter:

“My property has gotten old and needs to be revived. Everything changes. This is just a continuation of Cary’s growth.”

And I bet you $50 if the owner instead raised the rent to a level that would justify $1 million per acre in value, the media would go berserk claiming that he was ruining lives by gouging rents and the residents would stage a protest.

So the media and residents have pretty much done this to themselves. The old guy is just too smart to get involved in that type of mess and is simply going to take the easy way out and sell the land for redevelopment.

Petaluma Argus Courier: Petaluma designates 5 mobile home parks for ‘seniors only’

Preview:

Petaluma’s elected leaders made another move Monday in the ongoing struggle over the city’s mobile home parks and how they should be run.

In a 7-0 vote, the City Council approved a new “overlay district” for senior mobile home parks, effectively codifying “seniors only” designations at five of the city’s parks.

The vote follows announcements in June and July by WGP Property Management, the operators of Youngstown – a mobile home park at 911 N. McDowell Blvd. that had long been considered a seniors-only facility – that they intended to raise rents by more than $900 a month and to convert Youngstown to an all-ages park, or possibly close...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Wait, isn’t this the same City of Petaluma that just passed rent control? So now they think that they are getting somewhere with making all parks be seniors only – at a time when seniors can’t possibly afford to live in Petaluma? I believe the correct social media response would be WTF. I am endlessly amazed that people in California apparently don’t realize that the other 49 states have a cost of living that is a fraction of what they’re paying now – as much as 70% less. So if you live in Petaluma and are reading this, go get in your car and drive to Texas and find a nice retirement property and call Mayflower because you’re about to get a huge boost in disposable income. If you want to stay in Petaluma – even though it’s beyond expensive – then that’s your choice. But no matter what the City may mandate, all of those parks are going to be demolished and redeveloped in the not too distant future.

Miami Herald: New development will rise to dizzying heights — and wipe out their trailer park Read more at: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/real-estate-news/article278731494.html#storylink=cpy

Preview:

Carol Hatchet, 61, stood outside the small office of Miami Soar Mobile Home Park on a blistering hot Saturday evening among around 100 other residents. A familiar face, former park manager Steve Carroll, stood atop a water tank and began to tell the sweaty residents a familiar story: about a new vision for their old neighborhood. That new vision for their trailer park, bisected by Northwest 82nd Street between Miami Court and First Place, calls for a massive residential, office, retail and hotel development whose centerpiece would be a 50-story tower, far taller than anything currently nearby. It will obliterate their community,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

At least there’s some honesty to this article:

“The park is not closing tomorrow. Do not panic. You’re not being thrown out,” Carroll told the gathering. Not yet. But it’s coming."

The bottom line is the same as in every issue of this news analysis, so here we go again:

LOW LOT RENTS = REDEVELOPMENT.

Every park has a lot rent level that will stave off the wrecking ball. But in many cases it’s probably two or three times what the residents are paying now, which is insanely low throughout the U.S. Just go to Bestplaces.net and look at the single-family home pricing and the apartment rents and then tell me how a $300 national average lot rent is justified. It’s not.

The Columbian: WA mobile home communities organize against ‘economic eviction’

Preview:

From her pristine garden to her punchy graphic tees, 78-year-old Judie Short emanates a great warmth and appreciation for everything around her.

Upon entering her home in Aberdeen’s Leisure Manor Estates, guests find an office nook lined with vintage knickknacks and Seattle Seahawks memorabilia. Her kitchen shines in a resplendent shade of cherry red, and its many windows let in sunlight that carries on to the rest of the house. It’s a three-bedroom home, but she has converted the second and third bedrooms into a cat-themed craft room and a playroom for when her grandchildren come to visit.

“When we moved in five years ago, it was...

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Our thoughts on this story:

When you read this article and you cut through all the gas-lighting of 30% and 50% increases – which sound impressive – you realize that we’re talking a few hundred dollars more to live for literally $1,000 per month less than every other housing option in these markets. If your lot rent is $500 per month and goes to $700 that is a 40% increase – nobody can deny the math – but if you simply look at Bestplaces.net you see the apartment rent is $1,700+ per month. So can we please start putting the actual cost of housing in these articles? Have you noticed that none of the woke writers bother to do that even though they could get it off Bestplaces.net in ten seconds? That’s because it destroys their narrative and offends their audience.

The bottom line is that these parks are the best deal in town and that’s why people live there. Period. Do residents hate higher rents? Of course. But do they move out? No, because it’s still an incredible deal even at the higher prices.

The Aspen Times: Aspen Journalism: Organizing mobile home owners as investors gobble up parks

Preview:

Like a lot of his neighbors, John Sullivan looks down his Apple Tree Park street and across the Colorado River toward the small Western Slope town of New Castle and wonders about the future.

The 290-space mobile home park where he has lived for 25 years has one of the more picturesque settings among the 50 or so such parks, large and small, that dot the region from Aspen to Parachute.

The streets and yards are lined with mature trees to provide ample shade in the summer, and there’s a good-sized community park where children can play and families gather for picnics. Many of the spaces even overlook the river — albeit with Interstate 70...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, maybe I missed the memo that mobile home parks are supposed to be kept trashy in order to stay to the liking of the poorest 1% of the park residents:

The move away from local ownership has brought new rules for many park tenants, such as limiting the number of sheds and other exterior structures they are allowed to have, ensuring fences are stained and in good repair, and getting rid of junk cars and recreational vehicles or finding another place to store them. The rules are meant to clean things up in terms of the parks’ appearance. But they can be onerous, not to mention expensive for people who are just scraping by.

Do professional owners clean up properties and raise rents? Of course they do. It’s called progress. If you want to let old parks die and be redeveloped then listen attentively to the author of this article. If you want parks to become progressively nicer at higher rents and have longevity in a world of $2,000 per month apartment rents, then bring in every out-of-state professional investor you can possibly find to save the parks in your state from obliteration.

Rocky Mountain PBS: Why Colorado only has a handful of resident-owned mobile home parks

Preview:

This story is a companion piece to the podcast The Magic City of the Southwest, produced by Magic City Studios in partnership with KSUT Public Radio. New episodes air on the first Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.

In 2016, a few Colorado lawmakers were hearing concerns from residents of mobile home parks. At the time, Edie Hooton was a newly elected state representative from Boulder.

“We started having town halls, then more mobile homeowners would come to my town halls,” Edie Hooton recalled. Hooton heard complaints about rent increases, unfair evictions, and a lack of landlord transparency.

By 2018, Hooton and other lawmakers received a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Can we just be honest here? Having sold more than one mobile home park to the residents I can tell you that there is a reason why only 12 parks out of 900 in Colorado (yes, that’s only 0.013%) are resident-owned communities. I’ll lay it out in simple terms:

  1. Most residents don’t want to own their own community. How do I know? Just go ask the tenants.
  2. These type of transactions take at least two times longer normally that a regular sale and most sellers are not willing to wait around for it.
  3. A huge number of these deals fall apart in the end so after wasting months of time the seller is left to start over again.
  4. Non-profits are required to guarantee the loans, and most have zero interest in guaranteeing a “trailer park”.

But then there’s the reality of what happens after these incredibly rare and few deals actually close, namely:

  1. Rents seem to go up just as fast or faster (the park we sold in Austin to the tenants had to raise rents faster than we ever did just to cover the bills because they had no idea how to manage a property).
  2. Tenants are often miserable because their elected officers play favorites and there is no uniformity in rules enforcement, etc.
  3. These properties often look terrible as without professional management nobody follows any codes at all.

I love the fact that the writer of this article used New Hampshire as the gold standard of how great the concept is … since New Hampshire has among the fewest mobile home parks in the U.S. That would be like me comparing the cost of snow skiing equipment in Hawaii.

Now I know that the folks that facilitate these transactions really work the media to make dumb articles like this possible, but those are the facts and no amount of B.S. can change them.

News 4 JAX: Disabled veteran at center of dispute over $2,200 water bill from mobile home park gets new outrageously high bill

Preview:

A disabled veteran who turned to the News4JAX I-TEAM earlier this month after she was threatened with eviction by her landlord if she didn’t pay a $2,200 water bill, said she just received a new outrageously high water bill from the mobile home park.

Stan and Kelly ONeil banged on the door of the Three Seasons Mobile Home Park off Collins Road on Wednesday to demand answers from management after receiving a September water bill for $1,734.88.

“This is ridiculous, there’s no way in hell I used that much water,” Kelly ONeil said. “What I want to know is does their JEA bill reflect the amount of water I’m being charged for, for the last...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I know nothing about this case or about this property. But I do know there are two sides to every story and you are only hearing one. I bet that we could solve this in one day by simply putting on a new meter and seeing the reading 24-hours later. My bet is that where this water goes is not actually a mystery to the tenant, but I could be wrong.

Post Independent: Is resident ownership realistic? Some organizations see need for mobile-home-park rent control

Preview:

Voces Unidas-backed bill stalled at Capitol; Roaring Fork Valley’s 3-Mile residents forge ahead

Editor’s note: This is the closing installment of a story by Aspen Journalism that has been published in two parts, beginning on Sept. 25. Visit aspenjournalism.org to read the story in its entirety.

A key policy goal stated in a recent study of local and statewide mobile home parks is to give residents the opportunity to purchase their parks before owners decide to list them.

But that opportunity is very limited under legislation intended to help residents become owners, which first passed in 2020 and mandates a 120-day timeframe for residents...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Basically the same article as above. What happens is that these non-profits get with the media and start to do a ton of articles trying to persuade elected officials that their dumb ideas are actually genius. Unfortunately, all of the facts shown above hold true regardless of how you sugar-coat it, and that’s why the chances of pulling off a resident-owned community will remain at 0.013%. You have better odds of winning the lottery at the gas station.

WFMZ-TV: Manufactured housing is the most popular in southern states

Preview:

Manufactured housing varies in popularity across the U.S., but the South stands out for its higher concentration of manufactured homes. Fast-growing, high-population southern states like Texas, Florida, and North Carolina rank among the top states for total manufactured home shipments. But as a share of all new single-family homes, top locations include lower-income states like Mississippi, Alabama, Kentucky, and West Virginia, whose residents may be more drawn to manufactured homes as an affordable option.

Below is a complete breakdown of all 50 states. The report was produced by researchers at Construction Coverage, a website that...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you read the map you will quickly see that this headline is a fraud. There are 7 southern states with higher mobile home reliance yet 17 non-southern states that have roughly the same mobile home concentration. Some New York based journalists find it intellectually exciting to portray the south as poor and stupid and they equate mobile homes with that theory. However, if you actually look at the map – not the headline – you will see that among the states with the highest percentage of mobile homes as housing units is … NEW YORK. That fact must just drive these intellectual snobs crazy.

9News: Denver gets its first community-owned mobile home park

Preview:

DENVER — When Capitol City Mobile Home Park in Westwood went up for sale in July 2022, residents were scared. The threat of redevelopment or a new owner could have priced them out of their homes, putting them at-risk for displacement with no other affordable options. 

So, the residents decided they would all become the new owner, together. They just needed to secure $11.5 million to purchase the park themselves. Then, they could create a cooperative or land trust, a mobile home park owned by the community. 

After more than a year of organizing, residents finally have a signed contract with the current owner of the mobile home park, thus...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, you’re saying “gee this looks suspicious”. No, it’s the usual media trying to change the direction of politics schtick. Hopefully the elected officials of Colorado are smart enough to see through this attempted manipulation.