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Oil City News: Mills City Council accepting public input tonight before final rezoning vote

Preview:

MILLS, Wyo. — People interested in commenting on a City of Mills proposed rezoning ordinance are invited to speak at a public hearing on Tuesday.

The Oct. 10 hearing regarding the Mills Downtown and River Front Corridor Commercial District rezoning is scheduled during the regular 7 p.m. Mills City Council meeting in the council chambers at Mills City Hall, 704 4th St.   

A downtown and riverfront district would run along the North Platte River and Wyoming Boulevard. 

Current uses of properties proposed for rezoning include single-family residences, mobile homes and a four-unit multi-family complex, plus several vacant parcels, according...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Why can’t they just be honest and admit that they want to kick the mobile home parks out?

Pine County News: Tiny home community in Pine City?

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With a shortage of suitable housing and skyrocketing home prices in the Pine City area, comes a new prospect for the city: tiny homes. 

The idea of a small/tiny home community has come to the city as part of the Community Action Plan put in place in 2022. As part of a forum, made possible by a Blandin Foundation grant, the city explored what a tiny home community might look like, current statistics on housing in the area and what would be necessary to move forward with such a venture.

Tiny Timbers – An agrihood community 

Small/tiny home developer, Melissa Jones, shared her and her husband’s vision and project, Tiny Timbers, which...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This property owner gets points for creating a new word to help avoid the “trailer park” designation:

“An agrihood community”

Not sure if the variance will pass, but they should definitely get an award for creativity.

News 4 JAX: Disabled veteran at center of dispute over $2,200 water bill from mobile home park gets new outrageously high bill

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A disabled veteran who turned to the News4JAX I-TEAM earlier this month after she was threatened with eviction by her landlord if she didn’t pay a $2,200 water bill, said she just received a new outrageously high water bill from the mobile home park.

Stan and Kelly ONeil banged on the door of the Three Seasons Mobile Home Park off Collins Road on Wednesday to demand answers from management after receiving a September water bill for $1,734.88.

“This is ridiculous, there’s no way in hell I used that much water,” Kelly ONeil said. “What I want to know is does their JEA bill reflect the amount of water I’m being charged for, for the last...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I know nothing about this case or about this property. But I do know there are two sides to every story and you are only hearing one. I bet that we could solve this in one day by simply putting on a new meter and seeing the reading 24-hours later. My bet is that where this water goes is not actually a mystery to the tenant, but I could be wrong.

The Aspen Times: Aspen Journalism: Organizing mobile home owners as investors gobble up parks

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Like a lot of his neighbors, John Sullivan looks down his Apple Tree Park street and across the Colorado River toward the small Western Slope town of New Castle and wonders about the future.

The 290-space mobile home park where he has lived for 25 years has one of the more picturesque settings among the 50 or so such parks, large and small, that dot the region from Aspen to Parachute.

The streets and yards are lined with mature trees to provide ample shade in the summer, and there’s a good-sized community park where children can play and families gather for picnics. Many of the spaces even overlook the river — albeit with Interstate 70...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, maybe I missed the memo that mobile home parks are supposed to be kept trashy in order to stay to the liking of the poorest 1% of the park residents:

The move away from local ownership has brought new rules for many park tenants, such as limiting the number of sheds and other exterior structures they are allowed to have, ensuring fences are stained and in good repair, and getting rid of junk cars and recreational vehicles or finding another place to store them. The rules are meant to clean things up in terms of the parks’ appearance. But they can be onerous, not to mention expensive for people who are just scraping by.

Do professional owners clean up properties and raise rents? Of course they do. It’s called progress. If you want to let old parks die and be redeveloped then listen attentively to the author of this article. If you want parks to become progressively nicer at higher rents and have longevity in a world of $2,000 per month apartment rents, then bring in every out-of-state professional investor you can possibly find to save the parks in your state from obliteration.

Rocky Mountain PBS: Why Colorado only has a handful of resident-owned mobile home parks

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This story is a companion piece to the podcast The Magic City of the Southwest, produced by Magic City Studios in partnership with KSUT Public Radio. New episodes air on the first Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.

In 2016, a few Colorado lawmakers were hearing concerns from residents of mobile home parks. At the time, Edie Hooton was a newly elected state representative from Boulder.

“We started having town halls, then more mobile homeowners would come to my town halls,” Edie Hooton recalled. Hooton heard complaints about rent increases, unfair evictions, and a lack of landlord transparency.

By 2018, Hooton and other lawmakers received a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Can we just be honest here? Having sold more than one mobile home park to the residents I can tell you that there is a reason why only 12 parks out of 900 in Colorado (yes, that’s only 0.013%) are resident-owned communities. I’ll lay it out in simple terms:

  1. Most residents don’t want to own their own community. How do I know? Just go ask the tenants.
  2. These type of transactions take at least two times longer normally that a regular sale and most sellers are not willing to wait around for it.
  3. A huge number of these deals fall apart in the end so after wasting months of time the seller is left to start over again.
  4. Non-profits are required to guarantee the loans, and most have zero interest in guaranteeing a “trailer park”.

But then there’s the reality of what happens after these incredibly rare and few deals actually close, namely:

  1. Rents seem to go up just as fast or faster (the park we sold in Austin to the tenants had to raise rents faster than we ever did just to cover the bills because they had no idea how to manage a property).
  2. Tenants are often miserable because their elected officers play favorites and there is no uniformity in rules enforcement, etc.
  3. These properties often look terrible as without professional management nobody follows any codes at all.

I love the fact that the writer of this article used New Hampshire as the gold standard of how great the concept is … since New Hampshire has among the fewest mobile home parks in the U.S. That would be like me comparing the cost of snow skiing equipment in Hawaii.

Now I know that the folks that facilitate these transactions really work the media to make dumb articles like this possible, but those are the facts and no amount of B.S. can change them.

WFMZ-TV: Manufactured housing is the most popular in southern states

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Manufactured housing varies in popularity across the U.S., but the South stands out for its higher concentration of manufactured homes. Fast-growing, high-population southern states like Texas, Florida, and North Carolina rank among the top states for total manufactured home shipments. But as a share of all new single-family homes, top locations include lower-income states like Mississippi, Alabama, Kentucky, and West Virginia, whose residents may be more drawn to manufactured homes as an affordable option.

Below is a complete breakdown of all 50 states. The report was produced by researchers at Construction Coverage, a website that...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you read the map you will quickly see that this headline is a fraud. There are 7 southern states with higher mobile home reliance yet 17 non-southern states that have roughly the same mobile home concentration. Some New York based journalists find it intellectually exciting to portray the south as poor and stupid and they equate mobile homes with that theory. However, if you actually look at the map – not the headline – you will see that among the states with the highest percentage of mobile homes as housing units is … NEW YORK. That fact must just drive these intellectual snobs crazy.

The Gazette: Iowa City mobile home park residents say out-of-state owners boost rent, neglect parks

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IOWA CITY — Four years after a Utah company started buying Johnson County mobile home parks, residents say they’ve seen annual rent hikes of 10 percent or more, reduced services and poor maintenance.

Jeff Ramsey, 52, who has lived in Modern Manor Mobile Home Park on Iowa City’s east side for 16 years, said he and his brother, Jim Ramsey, 62, feel squeezed. Not only are they paying more in rent, but Havenpark Communities, the Orem, Utah company that bought the park in 2019, no longer pays for residents’ cable TV and mowing.

“It’s our first time being able to own our own place,” he said. “We both have disabilities and a fixed income. If...

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Our thoughts on this story:

You don’t even need to read the article. Yes, out-of-state owners raise rents. Yes, in-state residents raise rents just as far and fast. Why? Because the rents are absurdly low. When you see any market in Iowa in which mobile home park lot rents are higher than apartments or stick-built homes then you let me know. Until then, how dare you say that mobile home park rents are too high? If they were too high then they would not be 100% occupied – yet they are. It’s called supply and demand and it’s one of the most basic formulas of economics.

Lockport Union-Sun & Journal: Town of Newfane approves mobile home park changeover in Wrights Corners

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NEWFANE — A new residential development has received approval at the town level to start construction at the site of a longtime mobile home park in Wrights Corners.

Earlier this month, the Newfane Town Board unanimously passed a resolution to rezone the property, 6520 Ridge Road. Property owner Bart Adams said they will need to make one last appearance in front of the Niagara County Planning Board next month before “pulling the trigger” on construction at the property.

The development, Wrights Country Cottages, will consist of 19 stick-built homes replacing nearly all of the existing mobile homes on the premises. The development will...

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Our thoughts on this story:

And another mobile home park bites the dust. Same old story – low rents killed the park and the city was more than happy to oblige with any zoning needed to get the park torn down.

Post Independent: Is resident ownership realistic? Some organizations see need for mobile-home-park rent control

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Voces Unidas-backed bill stalled at Capitol; Roaring Fork Valley’s 3-Mile residents forge ahead

Editor’s note: This is the closing installment of a story by Aspen Journalism that has been published in two parts, beginning on Sept. 25. Visit aspenjournalism.org to read the story in its entirety.

A key policy goal stated in a recent study of local and statewide mobile home parks is to give residents the opportunity to purchase their parks before owners decide to list them.

But that opportunity is very limited under legislation intended to help residents become owners, which first passed in 2020 and mandates a 120-day timeframe for residents...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Basically the same article as above. What happens is that these non-profits get with the media and start to do a ton of articles trying to persuade elected officials that their dumb ideas are actually genius. Unfortunately, all of the facts shown above hold true regardless of how you sugar-coat it, and that’s why the chances of pulling off a resident-owned community will remain at 0.013%. You have better odds of winning the lottery at the gas station.

Marin Independent Journal: Novato council opens door to sell mobile home park to its residents

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A month after the Novato City Council declined a $30 million offer to sell a city-owned mobile home park to a private operator last month, the council opened the door this week to a new option — to sell the park to its residents.

On Tuesday, the City Council voted unanimously to authorize City Manager Adam McGill to enter into an exclusive negotiating agreement with the Marin Valley Mobile Country Club’s operating group should it express a desire to purchase the park.

The park is owned by the city but operated by the Park Acquisition Company, or PAC, which is led by park residents.

McGill stressed that the agreement is only meant to open...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Yes, you’re not going crazy. This is the fourth article this week stating that resident-owned communities contain unicorns and free ice cream and the whole world would be better if every park was owned by the residents. Is it working? Are you brainwashed yet? Or are you kind of “gosh, this is stupid”?

9News: Denver gets its first community-owned mobile home park

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DENVER — When Capitol City Mobile Home Park in Westwood went up for sale in July 2022, residents were scared. The threat of redevelopment or a new owner could have priced them out of their homes, putting them at-risk for displacement with no other affordable options. 

So, the residents decided they would all become the new owner, together. They just needed to secure $11.5 million to purchase the park themselves. Then, they could create a cooperative or land trust, a mobile home park owned by the community. 

After more than a year of organizing, residents finally have a signed contract with the current owner of the mobile home park, thus...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, you’re saying “gee this looks suspicious”. No, it’s the usual media trying to change the direction of politics schtick. Hopefully the elected officials of Colorado are smart enough to see through this attempted manipulation.

CBS Colorado: Colorado community rallies around residents of Wikiup mobile home park facing evictions

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Several families at the Wikiup Manufactured Home Community in Henderson, located in unincorporated Adams County, are facing evictions due to allegedly not following common guidelines.

Less than a month ago, CBS Colorado shared Tomasa Hernandez's story. She was asked to remove her fence surrounding her home -- a fence she says was there before she even started renting there -- among other requests.

The issue is she says she doesn't speak English, she did not understand the demands from management and the lease is under her husband's name who is currently sick. She has expressed new management has refused to speak to her on various...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Great quote from RHP:

The Wikiup Manufactured Home Community strives to provide a well-maintained community for our residents. The Community's rules and regulations are in place to benefit all residents. When issues arise, we make every effort to collaborate with our residents and have a track record of successful resolution. In this instance, our attorney is working closely with the resident's attorney to come up with a satisfactory resolution to allow the resident to maintain residency in the community. We remain committed to providing a property that ensures the stability of the entire community.
-Molly Boyle, RHP properties

Park owners HATE to lose tenants. It costs them thousands of dollars. They will always work to resolve every issue BUT THE RESIDENT HAS TO WORK WITH THEM.

Post Independent: Organizing mobile-home owners as investors gobble up parks

Preview:

Like a lot of his neighbors, John Sullivan looks down his Apple Tree Park street and across the Colorado River toward the small Western Slope town of New Castle and wonders about the future.

The 290-space mobile home park where he has lived for 25 years has one of the more picturesque settings among the 50 or so such parks, large and small, that dot the region from Aspen to Parachute.

The streets and yards are lined with mature trees to provide ample shade in the summer, and there’s a good-sized community park where children can play and families gather for picnics. Many of the spaces even overlook the river — albeit with Interstate 70...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Connect the dots from these passages:

It’s part of an ownership trend away from family-owned trailer parks (as they used to be called) — often built by farming and ranching families as a way to bring in additional income through rents and to help house workers for large public works projects in the mid- to late 20th century — and toward out-of-state real estate investment interests.

The move away from local ownership has brought new rules for many park tenants, such as limiting the number of sheds and other exterior structures they are allowed to have, ensuring fences are stained and in good repair, and getting rid of junk cars and recreational vehicles or finding another place to store them. The rules are meant to clean things up in terms of the parks’ appearance. But they can be onerous, not to mention expensive for people who are just scraping by

Having grown up and continuing to reside at the Cottonwood Springs Mobile Home Park, near Rifle, Muñoz said he’s used to rent increases, but usually no more than $10 or $15 a year. So, you go from paying maybe $410 to $425 in a year, where some of these corporate-owned parks are jumping from $400 to $500 or $600 in a single year,” he said. “And we don’t have any sort of legislation to prohibit that.”

So all this article is really about is that some tenants hate rent increases and rules enforcement. But how can you bring old parks back to life and make them nice without those two factors? The answer is: you can’t.

Those who want to live in filth and squalor because it’s cheap need to go to those type of properties. But the majority of tenants – 99% of them – want to live in a nice, updated property and pay higher rent for the right to do so. Don’t let this tiny minority of residents dictate and ruin the quality of life for the majority. It’s just plain stupid.

Petaluma Argus Courier: Editorial: Petaluma mobile home park owners must prove financial hardship

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It was a despondent sight last week as the residents of Youngstown Mobile Home Park gathered on the corner of North McDowell Boulevard, protest signs clutched in hand. A similar scene played out on Aug. 29 at Little Woods Mobile Villa on Lakeville Highway.

At both protests, there was an air of desperation — these aren’t people fighting for a principle, they are fighting for their homes.

The owner of the Youngstown Mobile Home Park called for its closure shortly after the city capped rent increases at mobile home parks to 4% of current rates, or by 70% of the Bay Area Consumer Price Index, whichever is less.

“Some people have ended up in...

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Our thoughts on this story:

These articles just keep getting ever more ridiculous. Here’s a case of a private property owner shutting down a park as the result of rent control, and the residents wanting them to prove how not raising rents is a hardship before they can tear the park down – as though the owner has any legal requirement to get their approval.

“It was a despondent sight last week as the residents of Youngstown Mobile Home Park gathered on the corner of North McDowell Boulevard, protest signs clutched in hand. A similar scene played out on Aug. 29 at Little Woods Mobile Villa on Lakeville Highway.

At both protests, there was an air of desperation — these aren’t people fighting for a principle, they are fighting for their homes.

The owner of the Youngstown Mobile Home Park called for its closure shortly after the city capped rent increases at mobile home parks to 4% of current rates, or by 70% of the Bay Area Consumer Price Index, whichever is less.

“Some people have ended up in the hospital because of all the fear and anxiety,” Mary Ruppenthal, a park resident since 1987, told the Argus-Courier. “We tried to allay their fears and calm them down, but none of us know for sure what's going to come of it all.”

I know that 70% of Millennials have said they would vote for a socialist candidate (that study came out during the Bernie Sanders campaign) but here’s a painful fact: property owners have the right to do whatever they want with their property. Really want to stop parks from being torn down? Then embrace much higher rents as that’s the only shot you have. Otherwise, there are few parks out there that might not be more profitable as apartment complexes which rent for an average of $2,000 per month when parks average $300. Rent control is a death sentence for mobile home parks, which have rents so low that they’re not sustainable. Any sensible person understands this.

Kearney Hub: How residents of an Ashland mobile home court dealt with displacement

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ASHLAND — A new year is supposed to represent rebirth, a clean slate, a chance to set new goals. Less than a week into 2023, the plans made for the coming year by residents of El Rancho, a mobile home court in Ashland, were scrapped when a letter dropped in their mailboxes.

Upon opening the letter, residents in the court’s nearly 30 mobile homes were notified that El Rancho had been sold to an investment group named Ashland Development, LLC. Soon after, residents learned that the LLC’s plan was to have the five-acre property converted to bare ground by August.

Residents would be given until July 31 to vacate the premises.

“I’m not a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Another article about a park being torn down for a more profitable use. Week after week I remind viewers that low rents = homelessness. Apparently not enough people read this.

The News & Observer: Mobile home tenants press Cary council candidates to do more on affordable housing

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Four months ago, Enir Oseguera moved with his young family to one of Cary’s last affordable housing communities, The immigrant father had been saving money and thought he’d found a place where his two children could be safe and thrive at Chatham Estates, a diverse mobile home park where rent is $400 a month.

Soon after the move, however, Oseguera learned the park property was for sale, putting hundreds of people who live there at risk of displacement and homelessness. “What do we do?” he asked. “We all know the cost of renting an apartment even nowadays and then buying property, well, that’s more of a question for many people.”

At a Cary...

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Our thoughts on this story:

A park owner got a giant offer of $50 million to demolish the mobile home park and put it to a more profitable use. They notified the residents, who now are trying to organize politically to somehow match the offer, naming their group “One Wake” (which maybe should have been “One Woke”?). Of course, this concept has a zero percent chance of ever happening as no non-profit is ever going to spend $250,000 per household to buy the park – and any sensible person would understand that.

Autoevolution: Step Inside the $239K Phillips House With Nearly 600 Square Feet of Pure Luxury

Preview:

If tiny homes require certain compromises in order to meet their primary goal of maximum freedom and mobility, park model homes come with the unquestionable advantage of spaciousness. One of the custom park model homes built by Movable Roots, the Phillips boasts no less than 580 square feet (53.8 square meters) of living space, including two lofts, resulting in a true mansion on wheels.

The fact that its owners had had previous experience with living in an RV full-time helped them envision the perfect mobile home. This is how the Phillips was born – a dreamy, ultra-comfortable family home with gorgeous interiors and ultra-modern...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Come on – do you really think a 400 sq. ft. home for $220,000 is a great deal? That’s $500 per square foot – roughly ten times more than a mobile home costs. Sticking a piece of LED lighting on a wall doesn’t really change that fact. If you have a budget of $220,000 – and this is the best idea you can come up with – you need to move to the Midwest.

KOTA TV: Mobile Home residents continue to face conflict with management

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RAPID CITY, S.D. (KOTA) - About a month ago we reported on complaints made by residents of Prairie Acres Estates. They claimed requests to repair various things on their lots were unreasonable and inconsistent. On Wednesday, more tenants came forward to share how the process is affecting them.

When we first reported on this story, the main issue most tenants had was how consistent the guidelines for the park were.

The park management claims that repairs are part of the tenants’ lease and management is holding them accountable to that agreement.

Tenants claim repairs are requested and upon completion, they receive another list of repairs.

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Our thoughts on this story:

This exchange between the owner and the residents explains the basic problem with these type of articles:

“We’ve been sitting waiting for over a year for them to do it because they evicted our neighbor over little things with his house and he was working on it too he was working on cleaning up his house and yard and everything and they just booted him,” said Kylee Koller, a resident in Prairie Acres Estates.

Erick Pickar, an attorney representing Prairie Acres Estates says management is willing to be accommodating to tenants who communicate with management. Pickar adds that evictions will always be their last course of action.

Tenants disagree, we spoke with one tenant who says they have been communicating with management and still feels there are no options but to comply or leave.

“I got that paper of fourteen things to do I looked over it I can’t afford to do the things that they want so we decided to just get an apartment cause I don’t really have lots of choices,” said Koller.

So who do you believe on this? I’m pretty sure the homes in question are in terrible condition and the owner is simply trying to make them do the basics of proper painting and skirting with a yard free of trash – not unreasonable requests. I bet it’s a really, really low bar. And, of course, the owner will lose thousands of dollars in evicting tenants in lost rent, legal cost, and re-filling the lot if it really comes to that. But at a certain point the owner simply has no choice if he is trying to bring the park back to life and attract new residents of a higher caliber. If this article included photos of the homes in question. I imagine there would be no doubt that I’m correct.

Iowa Capital Dispatch: DNR issues fines for asbestos violations at mobile home park and former school

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An eastern Iowa mobile home park demolished some of its homes without testing them for asbestos and did not dispose of them in a way to prevent asbestos exposure of its residents, according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

The demolitions at Fawn Creek Court in Anamosa last year spawned two of four fines totaling more than $30,000 that the DNR recently levied for asbestos violations. The other two fines stemmed from demolition of a former school building in Lost Nation.

Generally, buildings that are set for demolition or significant renovation are required by federal and state law to be tested for asbestos. It is a fibrous...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is one of the dumbest articles of 2023 – on a number of levels:

Dumb #1:  mobile homes contain virtually no asbestos and everyone knows it. The article admits that the only possible areas of concern would be “window caulking, window glaze and roof paint” – which effectively equals zero. A regular stick-built house of the right vintage would have asbestos throughout, from the roof shingles to the insulation to the flooring.

Dumb #2:  the mobile homes in question were never proven to have any asbestos in any possible way.

Dumb #3:  the park owner was then fined for tearing the homes down without asbestos testing – even though they had no asbestos in all likelihood (and I’m betting the baseless testing costs more than the demolition).

Dumb #4:  this whole issue with asbestos has been blown completely out of context for decades. Everyone knows that. Asbestos litigation originated with workers who inhaled asbestos in factories 8 hours a day. At that level, you can potentially have health hazards. But how in the world can anyone have serious ramifications from the incredibly tiny amount of asbestos from supposed ‘window caulking” which they might be exposed to – assuming they were standing next to the home being demolished and deliberately breathing in every fume they could find? Here’s what I found on the internet regarding the phobia over asbestos:

The definitive article exposing fraud in the diagnosis of asbestosis was by Gitlin et al. of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. In this study published in 2004 films read by plaintiffs’ radiologists were compared to the readings of the same films by independent radiologists. The plaintiffs’ radiologists read 95.9% of the films positive for abnormalities that were compensable for pulmonary asbestosis. The independent radiologists who were unaware of the readings by the plaintiffs’ radiologists read the same set of films as positive in only 4.5% of cases.1

A couple of examples of massive fraud perpetrated by doctors reading films for asbestosis attorneys highlight how expert witnesses can abuse the legal process and undermine the search for truth and justice. One doctor, Ray Harron, personally diagnosed 51,048 asbestos claims. He diagnosed a record number of 515 people in one day, which amounts to one diagnosis per minute. Another doctor, Ray Segarra, a pulmonologist diagnosed 29,000 claims of asbestosis. He estimates that he has made about $10 million doing this work. When questioned on National Public Radio about his readings of chest x-rays, Segarra replied, “I’m certainly not a schemer at all…but am I an opportunistic? I suppose I am. But everybody is.”

I rest my case.

Spectrum News 1: Manufactured homes could be a viable solution to affordable housing shortage

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LEXINGTON, Ky. — The Kentucky League of Cities (KLC) conference is occurring in Lexington at The Central Bank Center. It brings cities across Kentucky together, connecting them with services and finding potential solutions to issues facing their respective municipality.

One of those issues is lack of housing, especially affordable housing. At the conference, city stakeholders from across the Commonwealth could view a manufactured model home. Those homes could be completed within a matter of days, rather than months.

Logan Hanes, with Kentucky Manufactured Homes Institute, said despite the quick construction time, these homes have the same...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Clearly this writer has no idea how the real-world works:

“I think a lot of these improvements in that industry have gone unnoticed by local officials, planning administrators, those who write those ordinances and regulations. I think it may be time to take a fresh look at that”

No, it’s not the fresh look of mobile home parks that will open the floodgates to new construction. The reason virtually no city in the U.S. allows for the construction of new mobile home parks is simply because they cost the city a ton of money on school tuition and city services while bringing in only a fraction of their cost in property tax. Since almost all U.S. cities are having a cash-flow shortage it’s fully understandable why they view new mobile home parks as economic suicide.

Standard: Lesley’s Mobile Home residents are gone, but their rundown units remain

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RIVERDALE — The former residents of Lesley’s Mobile Home Park in Riverdale are long gone, forced out so the land can be redeveloped

But many of the units they occupied, some extremely dilapidated, remain, apparently to the chagrin of some residents and city officials. The units, most too old to be reused, are to be razed and removed. It’s just not clear when that will happen, though Mayor Braden Mitchell indicates the arrival of the machinery needed to complete the cleanup work is looming.

“I just found out (Friday) that they plan on starting to bring in the heavy equipment in the next week or two,” he said in a message Saturday to the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

You can’t even apparently redevelop a mobile home park without the neighboring residents complaining. The 5.5 acre tract is being converted from a mobile home park to a 155 unit apartment complex. The parcel is fenced off with “under construction” signs all around it. And yet the neighbors complain to the media of what an eyesore it still is. Is there anything more hated by the average American than a mobile home park? Doubtful.

News 4 Jax: ‘Something is not right’: Mobile park home tenants demand answers after unusually high water bills

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Nearly a dozen tenants of a local mobile home park are sharing their concerns over unusually high water bills after the News4JAX I-TEAM reported the case of a disabled veteran who was being threatened with eviction if she didn’t pay a $2,200 water bill.

Several residents at the Three Seasons Mobile Home Park off Collins Road said they have also been forced to pay outrageous water bills in fear of being evicted.

One of the residents, who didn’t want to be identified for fear of retaliation from the property managers, said they have been receiving these high water bills for years. The residents pay their landlord at the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I know nothing about the tenant, the metering system, or the billing methodology. But can a tenant use $1,000 per month in water? Absolutely. If you have two bathrooms and both toilet flappers are broken you could accomplish this easily. Or if you fill up a commercial water tank on a trailer all night several times a week (a common tool if you are a landscaper, paver or mobile car wash) then you could easily exceed $1,000. There are two sides to every story and you are only hearing one so far.

Times of San Diego: Mobile-Home Park in El Cajon Attracts Multiple Offers Before Selling for $4.4M

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A mobile home park on 1.65 acres in East County has been sold for $4.4 million, according to a real estate brokerage.

Shady Lane Mobile Home & RV Park, with 41 spaces for manufactured homes, is located at 244 Shady Lane in El Cajon.

“Shady Lane Mobile Home & RV Park was a Watkins family generational asset,” said Dustin Wilmer, vice president of investments in Marcus & Millichap’s San Diego Del Mar office. “The property had not traded hands since 1981 and this was the first time it has ever been advertised for sale.”

Wilmer said the property attracted 10 offers within its first 72 hours on the market. He represented the seller, a limited...

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Our thoughts on this story:

41 spaces on 1.65 acres might just set a new density world record for a mobile home park. And the seller got over $100,000 per lot for this property? Wow, I don’t get California investing at all.

VPM: Louisa mobile home residents living in ‘precarious position’

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Residents are pushing back against the investment firm that bought land beneath their trailers.

This is part one of a two-part housing series from VPM News Focal Point.

The trailer that Gabino Felipe owns at Six-0-Five Village Mobile Home Park is one of the only places his family can afford to live in Louisa County.

But Felipe might soon be priced out of the place he has called home for the past six years, as a nationwide trend threatens one of Virginia’s most affordable remaining sources of housing. Pending lawsuits could stave off a steep rent hike that residents allege violated their lease terms and state law. But a ruling in their...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Bestplaces.net tells me that Louisa County, Virginia has a median home price of $299,700 and a three-bedroom apartment rent of $1,440 per month. So here’s what’s maddening about this article:

“In December, Six-0-Five’s management tried to raise lot rents by more than 40%. The increase would have meant Felipe’s monthly rent payment increased from $445 to $625.”

So the rent is going up $180 per month to $625 and somehow that’s going to render these residents homeless? At $625 that’s less than half of apartment rents.

I would contend that anyone who cannot afford $625 per month needs to immediately move out of Louisa County and move to someplace less expensive. There are many counties in the Midwest where housing costs are half that amount. But the era of mobile home park owners subsidizing residents (which is what’s happening when the owner does not charge market rents) is ending. It reminds me of the current homeowner insurance issues in Florida. If you can’t afford insanely high insurance on your house, you need to move to a place you can afford – but the insurance companies are no longer going to subsidize you living on the beach.

CBS Colorado: More than 10 families of Wikiup mobile home park face evictions

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More than 10 families living in the Wikiup mobile home park are being evicted. According to a spokesperson for the community, owned by RHP Properties, residents are not following the rules.

Tomasa Hernandez and her family are one of those families being asked to leave. She says this puts them in a bind since this is all they can afford.

The family adds they've always paid their rent on time, but now they're being asked to leave by mid-September.

"I spend my time crying because I am always thinking, where am I going to go with my kids and my sick husband?" cried Hernandez.

To make ends meet, Hernandez sells fruit and vegetables on weekends...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There is no evil agenda going on here. The statement from the resident:

"When we realized we had a court date it was already too late, and they sent us an eviction notice, I think they want me to leave because I didn't remove the fence, they said my curtains are ugly and they told me to clean outside because it was messy," said Hernandez.

And now the statement from the park owner:

"Our priority at Wikiup is to provide a safe, well-maintained, and affordable community for our residents. We work with residents when there are violations to the rules and regulations of the community that present health and safety concerns for them and other residents.  If after repeated requests and notifications, residents fail to address those violations, for the sake of all residents, and as required under Colorado law, management, as a last resort, must take necessary legal steps to ensure compliance."

The bottom line is that the resident broke the rules, refused to fix the issues even after notification, and then the park owner gave up and evicted them for the good of the entire community at large.

It’s important to remember here that evicting any resident costs the park owner thousands of dollars: 1) legal cost 2) cessation of lot rent 3) demolition of the home. It is very rare for a park owner to evict for rules violations unless it’s a very serious case. There are two sides to every story and the writer of this article gave 99% of the benefit of the doubt to the resident and 1% to the park owner – and that’s clearly unfair.

Basically just more poor journalism that is simply geared to pander to their base at the exclusion of fairness.