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Planetizen: Durango Mobile Home Park Residents Form Community Land Trust

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According to an article by Kirbie Bennett and Jamie Wanzek in High Country News, a Colorado manufactured housing community offers “one model for how to preserve affordable housing, with the potential to reshape housing in the West in a way that allows residents to guide the discussion.”

When threatened with a buyout by a notorious institutional investor, residents of the Westside Mobile Home Park banded together to make their own offer. “With the support of Elevation Community Land Trust, Westside’s residents were able to purchase their park, becoming one of the six community land trusts in Colorado. It was the first time that Elevation...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I guess the residents did not read the fine print. But it’s right there in the article:

In years to come, residents, with the help of the land trust, intend to redevelop the park by removing the trailers and transforming the units into homes. The co-op and land trust are currently in the early stages of redeveloping the park, and residents are leading those discussions.”

So all the trailer park folks are going to be going bye-bye and replaced with single-family homes which they will never qualify for or afford. And they voted for it! What would you call this: “political suicide”?

Architectural Digest: 7 Stylish Mobile Homes Owned by Celebrities

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It’s common practice for A-listers to have trailers on set. A cozy mobile home-away-from-home outfitted with all the amenities they could need—packed into a sensible 600 or so square feet—is an oasis-like respite on long shoot days. Mobile homes also serve as secondary off-the-job home bases for some celebrities who’ve found themselves drawn in by the allure of an Airstream, the practicality of a downsized existence, or simply the freedom of an untethered dwelling that allows one to make themselves at home anywhere on and along the open road. Though they’re more strongly associated with a working-class lifestyle, there are mobile home...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Let’s be honest: these are not celebrities – these are “has-beens”. Nobody is leaving Bel Air for the trailer park if they are doing well in their movie careers. Tom Hanks should not even be on this list as he only used an RV on-set. The others would dump their “tiny” home in one second if they could amass enough cash to buy a decent house in the Hollywood Hills. I know that there is so much media out there today that writers struggle for content, but these type of articles insult our intelligence.

EPA: United States Files Complaint Against Oasis Mobile Home Park for Alleged Safe Drinking Water Act Violations

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OS ANGELES, Calif. – The Department of Justice, on behalf of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), filed a civil complaint in the United States District Court for the Central District of California today against the operators of Oasis Mobile Home Park, located in the Eastern Coachella Valley in Southern California. The complaint alleges that the Administrator of the Estate of Scott Lawson and a corporation called Lopez to Lawson, Inc. failed to properly maintain and operate Oasis’ primary drinking water well, treatment and distribution systems and wastewater system, and failed to perform corrective measures to protect the health...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I don’t know anything about this park or its water and sewer problems, but I do know the fundamental laws of economics and I’m sure that the heirs will simply condemn that park and sell the land off at a huge profit. 1,500 individuals will then be left homeless. It would have been much smarter for the government to make the required repairs for the late owner’s estate and then bill the park monthly until repaid in full. But, once again, it exemplifies that the most terrifying words in the English language are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help’. In this case the quote would be “I’m from the government and I’m here to help you be homeless”. Does nobody from the government realize that there’s no way the heirs are going to do any of this incredibly costly cap-x work when the land is worth more than the park in all likelihood and they probably just want to settle the estate?

The Times Record: State intervenes amid ongoing water problems at Wiscasset mobile home park

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After repeated water problems and outages dating back to February, the Maine Center for Disease Control is calling for the out-of-state owners of a Wiscasset mobile home park to drill a new well that can keep up with use.

 

Whippoorwill Hill Mobile Home Park residents have reported unscheduled water shut-offs and poor water quality over the past seven months, saying they haven’t been able to shower, wash their clothes or flush their toilets on multiple occasions. The property’s well was installed in 2020 but has run dry several times.

Maine CDC spokesperson Lindsay Hammes said Whippoorwill is contracting to get two potable water...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, the headline is misleading. This quote from the owners is very sensible on an Act of God they had no control over:

Maine Real Estate Management has been working daily to coordinate with experts to resolve the problem and anticipate a new well being installed very soon. In the meantime, we have arranged for regular deliveries of water to fill the holding tanks, as well as supplemental drinking water deliveries,” the company wrote.

So what’s the problem here, other than the considerable expense to the owners until the new well gets drilled? Well, apparently, none of this is good enough for the residents who claim they don’t like the taste of the “imported water” and it messes up their washing machines (which I’m sure is a complete falsehood). If the residents don’t get a better attitude I’m sure there’s a land re-development plan in the making for this tract – and who would blame the owners?

CBS Bay Area: Petaluma mobile home residents panicked by massive proposed rent increases

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PETALUMA -- Residents at a North Bay mobile home park say their landlord is retaliating against them for helping get new rent control ordinances passed in Petaluma. The tenants--all senior citizens--say they are terrified they could end up out on the streets.

The story begins in 2020 when the Youngstown Mobile Home Park was sold to new owners. Despite being a rent-controlled property, residents soon got a notice of rent increases of up to 40 percent.  

They fought the rent hike in arbitration and won, and then resident Jodi Johnson began lobbying for new city ordinances that would strengthen the rules around rent control. To her...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Wow, economics must be hard to grasp in the Bay Area. The owners are trying to save the park by raising the rents to market levels. Otherwise, as they explained to the residents, they will simply close the park and redevelop the land. But any way you cut it there’s no way that folks are going to continue to live in the San Francisco area at 1980s pricing. It’s really up to the residents how this movie ends – and the owners have been more than transparent.

Coastal View: Local mobile home park deserves better

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I have lived at the San Roque Mobile park for over 30 years now. I have seen many changes – some good, and far more bad ones. We have big potholes in our streets. Our park has become a trash mesh. Things get started and never get finished. Now they have closed off some of our streets, and the stupid gates are so silly indeed. This is not a nice place anymore for us!

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Our thoughts on this story:

“I have lived at the San Roque Mobile park for over 30 years now. I have seen many changes – some good, and far more bad ones. We have big potholes in our streets. Our park has become a trash mesh. Things get started and never get finished. Now they have closed off some of our streets, and the stupid gates are so silly indeed. This is not a nice place anymore for us!”

Translation: “You increased our rents, brought the old park back to life, and installed classy security gates – and we hate you for it!”. For every one of these type of residents there are 100 that are thrilled with the improvements and don’t mind paying higher rent to have a nicer property.

WSBT: Recycled shipping containers could bring life back to mobile home park in Marshall County

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MARSHALL COUNTY, Ind. (WSBT) — A new, non-traditional, housing community could be on the way in Marshall County.

It would turn a former mobile home park into an upscale residential area.

The proposed plans are for 33 two-story homes made out of shipping containers that are meant to last 200 years.

Thomas Landgrebe got the idea for the homes after building the modular home museum in Elkhart, which is now in the RV hall of fame.

He wants to take the old Maple Leaf Mobile Home Park on Michigan Road, between LaPaz and Plymouth, and create affordable housing for the community.

“It will be very much like a condominium. With this, it'll be like...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Back before Zappos founder Tony Hsieh died in a tragic fire his personal assistant gave me a tour of his Airstream Village community in which he lived in downtown Las Vegas. She told me the story of how he originally wanted to make Airstream Village out of shipping containers (it ended up being Airstream RVs and tiny homes) but found them to be unsuitable from a utility cost standpoint (“they were like tiny ovens” she said). So that’s problem #1. But the bigger issue is that I don’t think that anyone will pay $200,000 to live in a shipping container in Indiana – and then pay lot rent on top of that. This is a product that might work on the beach or a mountaintop. But maybe I’m wrong.

WENY: Cherry Lane Park obtains license to operate and demolition permits

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SOUTHPORT, N.Y. (WENY) -- A mobile home park in the town of Southport has taken the next steps in a proposed improvement project on its property on Sherman Avenue.

At a special meeting on July 17th, the Town of Southport board voted 3-2 to approve a new licensing agreement with Cherry Lane Park, LLC. According to the agreement, the park's owner had ten business days from July 17th to file for a license to operate, and apply for 10 demolition permits for condemned trailers on the property. 

However, according to the Town of Southport Supervisor Joe Roman, the necessary applications weren't submitted until Monday, August 7th. WENY...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I hope this project makes lots of money because when the city, residents and media go after the owner on such ridiculous technicalities as if the permits were supposed to be filed in “10 days” or “10 business days” you kind of wonder if the project is worth this much hassle.

Patch: Mobile Home In Malibu's Paradise Cove Listed For $2.95M

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MALIBU, CA — The Paradise Cove mobile home park — known for its celebrity residents and picturesque seaside locale — has a home for sale. Check out below why the New York Post once called the community "America's priciest trailer park."

Check out more information and plenty of photos below.

  • Address: 167 Paradise Cove, Malibu, CA
  • Price: $2950000
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathrooms: 2
  • Listing Description: A super buy in Paradise Cove, located in the desirable upper section of the park. This newer, custom-built, upgraded 3Bdrm, 2Bth, has it all! Open floor plan, high vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, tiled bathrooms and kitchen, top-of-the-line...
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Our thoughts on this story:

Look at the photos. Look at the price. Look at the photos again. Then look at the price again. If you think this is a good deal then you need to immediately check into rehab because you must be out of your mind.

Daily Camera: Boulder’s modular home factory sparks community debate about location, noise, environmental impact

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A new modular home factory being built in Boulder has stirred excitement as well as a healthy dose of controversy among members of the community.

The city announced Monday that construction on the factory is due to start this month. City officials who have championed the project say the factory — which is expected to eventually produce up to 50 permanently affordable homes every year — will be a game changer in terms of creating more affordable housing in Boulder. They also say it will provide an unparalleled hands-on learning experience for students in a local construction program.

However, numerous residents in nearby neighborhoods have...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Wait a minute – is this a typo?

Once the factory is completed in 2024, it can begin producing modular homes. It is expected to produce 12 to 15 homes per year in its first few years of operation, but eventually will ramp up its production to up to 50 homes per year.

The average mobile home park factory produces 7 homes per day. That’s 1,820 per year. And this one is going to produce 12 homes a year initially and then a whopping 50 per year in the future?

I know that marijuana is legalized in Colorado, but these would have to be the slowest assembly line workers in history, right?

Vermont Public: Vermont was already experiencing a housing crunch. Then came the summer floods.

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This story, by Report for America corps member Carly Berlin, was produced through a partnership between VTDigger and Vermont Public.

Even before this summer, Beth Foy knew families who spent months — even close to a year — searching for a place to rent in Johnson.

“We certainly were in a situation where there is much more demand than stock,” said Foy, who chairs the town’s selectboard.

Then came July’s historic flooding, which battered the Lamoille County town of roughly 3,500. Two recent assessments of the flood’s impact there – one by the local floodplain administrator and state Division of Fire Safety mapping damage, another by a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Hurricane Harvey did $200 billion in damage and only $20 billion was insured. That’s what happens when you have major flooding as few people are insured for it. Mobile homes sit about 3 feet off the ground and actually do better in floods than stick-built dwellings (just ask any park owner who survived Hurricane Harvey).

Insider: I left my life in DC to live in a 400-square-foot tiny home near Tampa. I feel like I have more space and I'm saving money so I don't regret it.

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This essay is based on an interview with Stefanie Mortenson, a 53-year-old HR director who moved from Virginia to Escape Tampa Bay Village's The Oaks community, a tiny home neighborhood near Tampa, Florida. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

My priorities changed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In 1998, I moved to Alexandria, Virginia about 10 miles from Washington, DC for a better career opportunity. I was a month shy of 25 years in Virginia and working at the US Senate Federal Credit Union — where I'm currently the director of human resources — when I moved to my new tiny home in Escape Tampa Bay Village's The Oaks...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is the part about these type of articles (and they come out all the time) that kills me:

OK, so $159,000 for around 400 sq. ft. works out to roughly $400 per square foot. You can buy a nice house in the Midwest for $159,000 – brick exterior, 3/2 and 2-car garage. And own the land underneath. So this lady apparently has no idea that there’s a whole universe of better housing options out there. And neither does the writer. And that’s kind of sad.

Hernando Sun: Tiny home development codes in process

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Commissioners at the July 25th Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting heard a presentation by Planning Director Michelle Miller to discuss the proposed legal language and specifications for tiny home communities.

Miller said that the provisions for individual tiny homes on lots where mobile homes are allowed are still being considered, but they were not discussed at this meeting.

Focusing on the development of tiny home communities, Miller identified the need for tiny home communities based on affordability, providing more housing options, and infill development.

Miller’s department established a new Planned Development Project-Tiny...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is the future of housing. Even my small town in Missouri recently passed a “tiny home ordinance”. Give the people what they want for heaven’s sake. Look at the drawings of the homes and you have to admit that they look a lot better than most of the larger homes in town. Who always shows up at the zoning meetings on this topic are stick-built builders who don’t want the competition and try to claim that tiny homes will cause the apocalypse. They won’t. In many applications they make infinite sense. Holding back this type of product is as hopeless as holding back Uber – it’s just going to happen in the end so better get out in front of it. Nice to see that this town is doing so.

WABI 5: Organizations turn to tiny homes to help combat youth homelessness

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MONMONTH, Maine (WABI) - A community of Maine builders came together for a cause.

“You never really think about unhoused teenagers,” Chase Morrill with Maine Cabin Masters said.

They’re building a tiny home community to help combat homelessness among youth in Franklin County, starting with this first home.

It’s a project founded by Bonita Thompkins.

“Recently, there was a report of 46 homeless youth in one school district in Franklin County, and I have got to imagine that the actual number is probably double,” Thompkins said.

Thompkins says she learned of youth homelessness firsthand while teaching at a high school.

“I noticed that there...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This non-profit is spending $60,000 to build an 8’ x 20’ house? That’s $375 per sq. ft. A mobile home costs around $40 per sq. ft. So my first thought is why are they reinventing the wheel when they can just call up any mobile home park dealer and do this for a fraction of the price using a HUD-code home? But the bigger issue is that it’s just plain dumb to think that the key to ending youth homelessness is by sticking them in a 8’ x 20’ hut and getting them on the nation’s welfare dole starting at 18. A better plan would be to take the $60,000, put them into trade schools, and teach them how to make a decent living. Those who want to take advantage of that program would become successful citizens. Those who refuse are going to trash these 8’ x 20’ shacks and run off. I just can’t make any sense of this initiative given the realities of life.

The Real Deal: Mobile home park and Santa Clarita at loggerheads over solar panels

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Attorneys for a mobile home park in Santa Clarita have played their latest card in a legal poker game with the city over a hillside covered with solar panels.

Canyon View Mobile Home Estates has responded to an appeal filed by the city to a judge’s order regarding the solar system at 20001 Canyon View Drive in Canyon Country, The Signal reported.

Superior Court Judge Stephen Pfahler ruled early last year that if the city orders the removal of 6,580 solar panels, the city must pay for the panels (which it can keep) and the cost of plucking them off the hill.

The city’s appeal last spring argued the city 30 miles north of Los Angeles...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Every time I drive across America I am confronted by those hideous wind turbines that make scenic vistas look like industrial graveyards. And now suddenly people are waking up to the fact that all this wind and solar energy is really, really ugly to look at? I could have told them that 20 years ago.

Cleveland: Cleveland MetroParks should maintain Euclid Beach mobile home park as affordable housing

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I love the Metroparks. The abundance of conservation, education, and recreation that they provide is phenomenal.

I am also concerned about housing justice. There is a significant shortage of affordable, accessible housing in Cleveland and across Northeast Ohio. Therefore, I am concerned about the destruction of existing affordable housing at the Euclid Beach Mobile Home Community in favor of the expansion of Euclid Creek Reservation. Cleveland Metroparks could play a key role in keeping the Euclid Beach Mobile Home Community open.

Cleveland Metroparks is the crown jewel of greater Cleveland. This free, public park system is vital...

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Our thoughts on this story:

“I am also concerned about housing justice. There is a significant shortage of affordable, accessible housing in Cleveland and across Northeast Ohio. Therefore, I am concerned about the destruction of existing affordable housing at the Euclid Beach Mobile Home Community in favor of the expansion of Euclid Creek Reservation. Cleveland Metroparks could play a key role in keeping the Euclid Beach Mobile Home Community open.”

Gee, not another article about how great it would be if residents owned their own parks? What a coincidence!

Reminds me of the story of Esther Sullivan, the Associate Professor in Boulder, CO who took credit for causing virtually every negative industry article for a several year period (including John Oliver). It’s amazing that U.S. media is so lame that single individuals can pervert the entire media conglomerate to take the wrong position on a macro scale – and that Americans are dumb enough not to spot this manipulation.

WJTV: Jackson leaders announce new affordable housing project

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JJACKSON, Miss. (WJTV) – Leaders with the City of Jackson and other organizations announced a new initiative to provide affordable housing in the community.

Jackson Mayor Chokwe A. Lumumba said the city will work in collaboration with the Mississippi Manufactured Housing Association, Rosemont Human Services and the Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of American on a project to build new, affordable housing.

The partnership will leverage manufactured homes to provide an accessible and sustainable housing solution for Jackson residents. They plan to open a demonstration home in Ward 4 at the corner of Halsey Avenue and General Patton...

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Our thoughts on this story:

A 1,300 sq. ft. home for $130,000 plus the cost of the land is not exactly a big deal. You can attain that in pretty much every city in the U.S.

But remember that Jackson is also the city that can’t even keep their public water system working for months now. I was there recently and the hotels have “boil water” signage at the registration desk (not sure how you do that in a hotel). Read about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson,_Mississippi,_water_crisis

Realizing it’s Jackson they probably messed up the decimal and it’s $1,300,000 for a 130 sq. ft. house. That’s more likely.

Virginia Mercury: Project:HOMES marries compassion to innovation at Chesterfield, Va.’s Bermuda Estates

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Claudia Guerrero Barrera enjoys her role as community engagement specialist for Virginia-based housing nonprofit project:HOMES, spending afternoons sitting around a kitchen table, drinking coffee, and chatting with women in the Bermuda Estates neighborhood of Chesterfield. 

They discuss their relief at having persuaded the county to place a school bus to stop in their newly paved cul-de-sac, so the children no longer have to wait on a busy strip of Route 1. They nibble on homemade treats, sharing plans for parties they’ll have at the community center once it is finished.

Less than two years ago, Claudia had never heard of Bermuda Estates...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There’s one item completely left out of this article:

Less than two years ago, Claudia had never heard of Bermuda Estates Mobile Home Park, and the Bermuda Estates residents she now shares easy chatter with were at that time fearful of being forced out of their homes. The owner, J&J Equities, LLC, was selling the park, and the prospective buyer planned to redevelop the land and build townhomes. This meant the nearly 40 families living at Bermuda Estates would be displaced, their homes, meticulously tended rose gardens and memories plowed under to make way for new homes that would not be affordable to them.

That item is what did they pay?

My bet is that they paid $100,000 per lot or more. And then you have to ask yourself “wouldn’t these people just be better off if they took the $100,000, relocated to a cheaper place than Virginia, and bought a nice stick-built house for cash?”

This whole “let’s buy the park to fend off redevelopment” nonsense is really nothing more than virtue signaling by bureaucrats and non-profits who want acclaim for saving 40 households housing when, for the same money, they could have paid for 160 people to go to college, or 800 people to renovate their homes and lower their utility costs.

Portland Press Herald: Letter to the editor: Wiscasset mobile home park plagued by poor management

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Last winter, the residents of Whippoorwill Hill Mobile Home Park in Wiscasset struggled with continuous shutdowns of its water supply and the park’s failure to maintain its roads and ditches. This problem continues today.

The park’s management, Maine Real Estate Management of Bangor, has ordered water to be trucked in from outside, but these water supplies become contaminated because there are leaks in the water supply pipes that park management has failed to repair. Consequently, a number of the park’s residents, including two young children, recently developed ear infections while attempting to bathe or shower in the contaminated... Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Last winter, the residents of Whippoorwill Hill Mobile Home Park in Wiscasset struggled with continuous shutdowns of its water supply and the park’s failure to maintain its roads and ditches. This problem continues today..Meanwhile, during the past two years, Maine Real Estate Management and its anonymous owner have raised the park’s lot rents by nearly 66%, all while failing to fix the problems that are causing physical harm to all of our residents at the park.

Well, I guess we all know what comes next. Goodbye mobile home park and hello new apartment complex. And the resident who wrote this letter to the editor will get top billing for causing the park to shut down. If you read the article, the owner is trucking in water until the repairs are completed, which costs a fortune. Yet they get zero respect from the residents. There are two sides to every story, and I’m betting $50 that the park owner is in the right here. They are trying to save the park and bring it back to life, and a few loud residents are fighting them every step of the way.

High Country News: How a mobile-home park saved its community from a corporate buyout

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On a quiet day this spring, Alejandra Chavez walked into her office at Westside Mobile Home Park in Durango, Colorado. Residents were gathered in the community space, discussing their plans for the park’s future, some leaning on the kitchen’s baby-blue counters while others sat in plastic lawn chairs. A year ago, this building was owned by a New York corporation and was off-limits to residents. But now, residents use the space for yoga, child care and community events. That afternoon, there were piñatas in the corner, left over from a recent birthday party. 

Not long ago, 63 families at Westside faced the threat of displacement. In...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, this is virtually cut-and-paste #4 this week on the topic of how great the world would be if the tenants owned the parks:

After months of fundraising and working with the Denver-based nonprofit Elevation Community Land Trust, Westside made a successful offer and formed a housing co-operative. Now owned jointly by its residents and Elevation, the park operates as a community land trust, which removes land from the real estate market and transforms it into community-owned property. Two decades after she first arrived in Durango, Chavez, a DACA recipient, is now the park’s property manager and the co-op’s vice president.Their voices will be heard now. They weren’t listened to before.

Are you brainwashed yet?

Superior Telegram: Douglas County to fund mobile home park cleanup

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SUPERIOR — Douglas County plans to clean up two mobile home parks in Parkland using money from the American Rescue Plan Act.

The Administration Committee on Thursday, Aug. 3 recommended spending up to $200,000 to remove 23 mobile homes that remain on two sites that served as the north and south Country Acres Trailer Parks on Douglas County Highway E. The money will be used for asbestos abatement, demolition and the removal of mobile homes.

The decision came after the county twice attempted to sell the property under the condition the trailers would be removed from the sites. In June, the county received no bids for the property, and...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I don’t know any of the facts on this story, but the optics to me, the reader, is that Douglas County succeeded in their mission to get rid of these mobile home parks:

Justag LLC was one of the bidders rejected in July because plans for the properties included creating a mobile home park or manufactured home community with 59 sites.Creating a mobile home park on the sites again would require a zoning change, which is unlikely to gain support from Parkland town officials or the county, Liebaert said. The mobile home parks preexisted zoning regulations adopted in the 1970s, he said. The property is currently zoned for residential development and a mobile home park would require commercial zoning, he said.”

As I recall the county took over these properties claiming they were in substandard condition. Then they were going to sell them off, but the only bidder wanted to operate them as mobile home parks. So they killed that off as fast as they could.

This is the reality of city/county attitudes regarding affordable housing. They don’t really want it at all, but to say that might trigger cancel culture so they instead come up with these absurd stories of how it wasn’t really their fault.

KESQ News Team: Families displaced by DHS mobile home park fire asked to pay $10,000 for debris clean up

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Although families displaced by a destructive fire two weeks ago in Desert Hot Springs have a place to stay for now, they say they are filled with concern.

The fire at the County Squire Mobile Home Park on July 18 damaged 14 homes and 12 vehicles, leaving 100 residents evacuated.

On Thursday, families told News Channel 3/Telemundo 15's Marco Revuelta that they were sent a letter by the owners of the mobile home park demanding $10,000 by August 14 to be able to clean up the burned debris or they'll have to do it themselves.

Affected residents say it's another challenge being added to their plate given they are also looking for new...

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Our thoughts on this story:

A mobile home is a parking lot. If your car burns down you still are responsible to remove the car and pay the rent until it’s gone. It’s not rocket science. But instead, here’s what the residents are saying:

"We're very frustrated because we've been left in the streets. We've been left on the street, nothing left. If I haven't been able to find a home because I have no money, how am I supposed to pay for this?" said Martin Verduzco, a resident who lost his home due to the fire. 

What the park owner is doing is following the legal methodology to remove the burned homes themselves. Somebody’s got to do it. Obviously, the residents are not going to. The park owner ends up paying the bill, as usual.

Instead of the writer of this article pointing out that the park owner is the good guy who is actually taking it on the chin, they portray the residents – who are neglecting their legal responsibility – as the heroes. When will the U.S. fixation on lack of personal accountability ever end?

WCAX: Flooding had outsized impact on 4 Vermont mobile home communities

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BERLIN, Vt. (WCAX) - Just as it did during Tropical Storm Irene, the flooding last month had an outsized impact on Vermont’s mobile home communities, throwing residents’ lives into disarray.

The Berlin mobile home park was one of the hardest hit communities hit during the floods. Many senior and low-income people lived in what now looks like a ghost town.

“It’s going to take a lot of money to get this back to where it was before. I lost my driveway, my property, it’s underneath this bank,” said Mark Christie, the owner of a mobile home in Barre whose house was decimated in a landslide during the deluge. He now finds himself at a...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The state has been extremely clear about the steps to get people back on their feet:

State leaders Tuesday laid out the next steps for mobile homeowners like Christie -- register with 211 and FEMA, ask for a certificate of condemnation from your town, and don’t demolish your home until the FEMA award process is complete.

The problem is that – despite getting between $20,000 and $50,000 on average – the residents don’t want to wait. This kind of reminds me recently of the article in which the park residents were going to file a class action lawsuit against an owner because the power was off for three hours.

I have had my own electricity lost in a storm for a week when it was 100 degrees out. I have had my water knocked out for days when a pipe ruptured and it was too cold to dig. It’s called life. You can’t deal with life without some degree of patience and apparently Vermonters don’t have a lot of it at the moment.

The Center Square: Manufactured homeowners rally for lot rent caps

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Residents of manufactured home communities often face the same problem: constantly rising lot rental fees that some critics say “predatory” investors use to hold residents “hostage.”

That’s why Sen. Judy Schwank, D-Reading, offered a simple solution that’s gained the approval of advocates long battling the issue: rent caps.

Senate Bill 861 would amend Act 261, creating a cap on yearly land rent increases on manufactured homes. Manufactured home communities provide a source of affordable housing for seniors, veterans, and individuals with disabilities on fixed incomes. Its companion, House Bill 805, was introduced by Rep. Liz Hanbidge,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Before you get worked up, go to the end of the article that sheepishly mentions that the bill only restricts lot rent increases to one time per year and with no limitation. The writer kind of hyped up the rest including the title.

Basically, more pandering and virtue signaling to their voting base – with more than a little help from the media.

Thank heavens that most PA legislators know that actual rent control dooms all mobile home parks to almost certain redevelopment over time.

Daily Montanan: New housing model in Montana turns tenants into shareholders

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Collin Bangs got a phone call when the historic property on Wolf Avenue in Missoula went up for sale.

His daughter, Melissa Bangs, lives next door. She’d seen other apartment complexes sell, new owners hike up rents, and longtime residents displaced.

Collin Bangs, a developer in Missoula who has long worked in affordable housing, said his daughter told him a sale on the open market would devastate her neighbors.

“If that happens, half of those people will be homeless,” Bangs said his daughter told him.

She asked him to buy the property instead and hold onto it for a spell.

If he could buy it, she’d rally the tenants and housing...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Read this article closely as it’s nothing but smoke and mirrors. The public spends $1 million to build 8 housing units that are as small as 395 sq. ft. and which equates to $125,000 per unit. All this to save people $100 per month in rent using this goofy coop structure. The free market is good at this stuff and bureaucrats are not – so please stop with this stuff as you are embarrassing yourselves.