Mobile Home Park News Briefing

Mobile Home Park Investing Audios | Mobile Home Park Investing Videos | Mobile Home Park Mastery Podcast



KGUN: City of Tucson calling architects, designers for casita model competition

Preview:

The city of Tucson's planning and development services announced it's launching a competition directed at architects and designers.

To participate, these professionals will submit designs of casitas, or accessory dwelling units (ADUs), to help streamline the planning and building process for the city and future homeowners.

AARP is funding the competition with the 2023 Community Challenge grant in order to "enhance further efforts in promoting casitas as an inclusive and adaptable housing option for the community."

Dan Bursuck, who is a part of Tucson's development department, said the team met with officials from other cities, like...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I really like this idea. I have long thought that affordable housing (yes, including mobile homes) are not nearly as attractive as they could be. The industry needs some fresh ideas and I have no doubt that a gifted college student may well contribute the idea that revolutionizes the way housing looks. I see all these cool designs in European design magazines at the bookstore and wonder why the U.S. can’t come up with its own fresh ideas. Maybe this contest will make something happen. It can’t hurt.

CBS Colorado: Clear Creek County mobile home parks in trouble with skyrocketing rent: "We are in danger of losing it"

Preview:

Right now some Colorado residents are fighting tooth and nail to try and remain in their homes, some of which they've lived in for decades in Clear Creek County. 

The county has a collection of four mobile home parks that are up for sale right now. If they sell, new owners or property managers could raise their rents, or try to build on those properties and remove their homes altogether. That being said, those parks are potentially eligible for help from the state or county, if they can find grants to have the county purchase the parks and keep rents low. 

CBS News Colorado talked with several residents from those parks whose hope now...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I’m afraid these residents are in for a rude awakening:

“The county has a collection of four mobile home parks that are up for sale right now. If they sell, new owners or property managers could raise their rents, or try to build on those properties and remove their homes altogether. That being said, those parks are potentially eligible for help from the state or county, if they can find grants to have the county purchase the parks and keep rents low”. 

Most bureaucrats talk a big game until you ask them to write a check and then they hide under their desks. Similarly, any new buyer will surely raise the rents significantly as these parks look to be mismanaged from the photo and will require new professional leadership and capital expenditure, and that will almost certainly require higher rents. And, of course, they are also in a prime position for redevelopment.

Any way you cut it, the probable outcome is that the parks will either be torn down or the rents will go up. I see little chance of the bureaucrats rushing in to save the day as you could make the same argument that they should buy the local apartments, too, and the list goes on and on.

Nobody really appreciates mobile home parks until they are on the verge of going away – kind of like some sad country western song.

Marin Independent Journal: Marin Voice: Novato’s mobile-home community checks many ‘blue zone’ boxes

Preview:

Did the state ask how you’re doing?

Last week, I found a survey in my mailbox from the California Department of Aging inquiring about whether I was securely housed or feeling lonely or getting adequate nutrition. It was a comfort to me that my state was pursuing all the right questions, whether or not this particular agency had any solutions at hand.

I have a great deal of familiarity defining those solutions, as a medical anthropologist teaching behavioral and integrative health. I’ve lectured at national conferences and published peer-reviewed journal articles about the value of social connections and ways to harness the social...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

OK, do you spot the scam going on in the media right now:

“It occurred to me that 90% of the questions in this four-page survey were satisfied by my local community, Marin Valley Mobile Home Country Club (MVMCC). It is a close-knit mobile home park of over 400 residents, owned by the city of Novato since 1997, with competent oversight from an elected group of residents. Novato doesn’t provide these healthy living activities, such as yoga or book clubs, as recommended in the survey, but the residents themselves provide them through volunteer commitments.However, the city has provided security and stability by serving as a nonprofit entity-owner, with reasonable, affordable rents. A defined 40% of the lots are reserved for low-income residents.”

There are only around 300 resident-owned mobile home parks in the U.S. out of 44,000 parks. So this is all nonsense and not worthy of this much media time.

So why are there suddenly a ton or articles on how great life is when residents own their own communities? Clearly, this is a big media push that is being promoted by a number of non-profits behind the scenes that are trying to brainwash Americans (and politicians) that this is the greatest idea since sliced bread.

Smart people will spot that this is a scam and not buy it. But unfortunately, idiots will.

Austin Monitor: Housing costs analysis endorses changes in lots sizes, compatibility requirements

Preview:

City staff and researchers at the University of Texas looking to reduce housing costs have published their recommendations on policies for City Council to consider.

A memo published last week offers a broad overview of the current state of affordability and development costs in Austin. The analysis by the Development Services and Housing departments and UT’s LBJ School of Public Affairs was initiated following a 2021 resolution that directed the city manager to determine the causes of and possible solutions to Austin’s increasing housing costs.

The recommendations from the 2022 UT research paper “Local Affordable Housing Challenges:...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Great news Austin residents! City Hall is proposing to build next to your subdivision:

·         Accessory dwelling units

  • Rezoning manufactured housing communities
  • Low-income housing.

Better call your realtor and put your house on the market before more people find out what’s about to happen.

The Alamance News: Complaint filed in superior court to force town of Green Level to turn over public records related to May 2023 rezoning

Preview:

A complaint and petition for a writ of mandamus (i.e., a request for a court order) has been filed in Alamance County civil superior court to compel the town of Green Level to turn over public records related to a rezoning decision for two mobile home parks decided at a special meeting on May 30, 2023.

The complaint and petition has been filed by the companies that own two mobile home parks within the town of Green Level’s jurisdiction: Personalized Village II, which owns Otter Creek Mobile Home Park at 2648 and 2606 East Simpson Road; and Green Level MHC, which owns the Green Level Mobile Home Community at 2156 James Boswell Road,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Wait a minute … are you saying that a city hall might have violated the law and now won’t hand over any of the notes or minutes from the meeting? That they are refusing transparency regarding their actions? Welcome to the new U.S.A.

NBC Palm Springs: Displaced Mobile Home Park Residents Heartbroken, Angry Following Property Manager Meeting

Preview:

“I got the call when I was at work, and when they said, ‘I’m sorry, I’m not going to be able to save your home,’ that broke me,” Julieta Perez, a resident who lost her home in the fire, shared tearfully.

Julieta Perez moved to the Country Squire RV and Mobile Home Park two months ago.

As a single mother of two young children, losing her new home was more than devastating.

“I was just feeling like I was getting back on my feet,” Perez continued. “I was feeling like, ‘Okay, things are getting better, things are finally going to be okay’…I have worked so hard for everything that I have and my kids were so happy to finally have their...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This quote reflects everything that’s wrong with the perception of mobile home park landlords:

[when a home burns down] residents are still required to pay rent for their mobile home spot, regardless if their house is still standing….But that’s not all.“They’re now telling us that we’re responsible for cleanup,” Castillo continued. “These families, many of whom didn’t have insurance, are now left to scramble and find apartments, find other places where they already don’t meet the income requirements. Aside from doing that, they also have to now find a way to save money, to pay the over $5,000 in cleanup fees plus the monthly rent until they are able to put in their 30 day notice to vacate.” Leaving many not knowing what’s next.“I feel like they’re just seeing us as dollar signs,” Perez said.

According to this rationale, mobile home park owners are not landlords, they are apparently government agencies – non-profits – that are responsible for much more than just providing parking spaces for mobile homes. Can you imagine applying this same logic to a parking lot at the airport in which your car burned down while you were on your trip. Do you think that would make you not responsible for your parking fee? For removal of your car? To any damage to the parking lot that the fire caused?

This is just plain stupid.

Insider: Tiny homes are more than backyard gimmicks. They could help mitigate the housing crisis.

Preview:

Katie Sandoval-Clark, a nonprofit leader and mother of two, built a bungalow in her parents' backyard so she could afford to raise her children in the Bay Area.  

Blue Wells, a former corporate executive battling cancer, moved to a 600-square-foot house in a South Carolina tiny home village and felt more free than he ever had living in his 3,500-square-foot home.

The Randolphs own a business in New Hampshire, and are building a tiny home village to provide affordable housing to their employees and entice young people to set down roots.  

If you've ever had a conversation about what can be done to make housing more affordable, you have...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

It’s like electric cars: they’re not for everyone. I have no desire to live in a 300 sq. ft. house, nor do I know anyone who does. I think those who want to “live small” are already working on that dream. But I also think that houses under 1,000 sq. ft. don’t fall into the average American’s list of goals, and that’s why you’re not going to see a ton more interest. Mobile homes hit that 1,000 sq. ft.  threshold and that’s why they’re in endless demand. I’ve personally sold hundreds of homes and I can tell you that under 1,000 sq. ft. is a deal killer.

El Pais: Neither hippies nor nomads: Unaffordable rent in the US forces thousands into a mobile lifestyle

Preview:

Ayden, 13, has always lived on wheels. Born in a San Diego hospital, he spent time in an incubator before his parents took him to live in a small, converted ice cream truck. Now the family lives in an old 1984 Southwind mobile home. He’s a happy and healthy child who enjoys enjoying playing on the street, watching YouTube videos, and creating his own animations. His parents shower him with love, and like many families with children, he is the center of attention.

Ayden has never attended school. His mother, Julienna, is a 53-year-old woman from New York. She teaches him in a makeshift classroom for three hours a day, five days a week....

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

No, I don’t buy into this viewpoint. Although there’s no question that rents have gone up, $400,000 homes and $2,000 per month apartments are only in giant cities. Nobody ever talks about the alternative. Here’s the actual stat from Wikipedia on life outside of the city:

Rural areas in the United States, often referred to as rural America, consists of approximately 97% of the United States' land area. An estimated 60 million people, or one in five residents (17.9% of the total U.S. population), live in rural America.

So if you move out to the 97% of America that is outside major cities, you can get a nice house for $100,000 and a nice apartment for $500 per month. I know, because I live in a town of 4,500 an hour outside of the big city. These “transient” people described in the article need to give up on their “big city” obsession, move to rural areas, get stable jobs, and provide a nice home for their families. This entire “I can’t afford the real world” nonsense is the opposite of personal accountability and the truth is that there’s absolutely no reason for anyone to live in a Winnebago in a WalMart parking lot. If that’s your lifestyle then the problem is you and not the U.S. housing market.

Forbes: Trailblazer 3D-Printed Homes Take Shape In California’s Coachella Valley

Preview:

In true pioneer tech fashion, 20 modernist 3D-printed homes are rising in Desert Hot Springs, California, about 10 miles north of Palm Springs. Three of the four-bedroom residences, which include accessory dwelling units, have recently been listed at $995,000 each. The homes, sited in a 22-acre gated community of hilltop dwellings, are expected to be completed by year-end.

“The homes are the first 3D-printed zero-net-energy homes in the world,” says Basil Starr, founder and chief executive of Beverly Hills-based Palari Group, the technology-driven developer of sustainable communities that is spearheading the build.

Although some...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This was an interesting article until I got to the actual pricing: $1 million for 1,866 sq. ft. The whole point of alternative construction methods is to save money – not spend $500 per sq. ft. on something that is, at best, experimental with no stats on resale value. Makes no sense to me.

The U.S. Sun: Home Depot is selling an $8,325 tiny home with an L-shape wall and natural light

Preview:

AS tiny homes gain popularity across the country, The Home Depot is showing you don’t have to splurge to attain home ownership with a small house available for just north of $8,000.

As Americans look to lower their monthly spending, tiny homes have become more common, no matter if you’re living by yourself or with a family.

With traditional homes’ price tags typically set above $200,000 and monthly mortgage payments remaining high across the board, some people turn to an unorthodox and minimalist lifestyle: tiny homes.

Many people have converted vans and sheds into full-scale tiny homes for less than $10,000.

At The Home Depot, several...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, these are cool. And 144 sq. ft. for $8,325 means a 1,000 sq. ft. model (which is much more livable) would only cost around $50,000. And, yes, this is the solution to the affordable housing crisis. And, no, you can’t build them virtually anywhere in the U.S. due to the Uniform Building Code. And the construction industry will never let that code be changed. So when people tell you that it’s impossible to build affordable housing they’re not telling you the truth. The truth is that the government ensures that you can’t with codes that most people don’t even know exist. Change the codes and between this type of option and 3-D printed homes you could provide $150,000 stick-built dwellings in cities across America (the average lot in the U.S. is $80,000 so you have to add that in, too, thus the $150,000 price point).

WCAX: Are Vermonters going to build back in the same flood-prone areas?

Preview:

BARRE, Vt. (WCAX) - Following this month’s devastating flooding, the state of Vermont is once again considering buying out homes in areas susceptible to future storms.

Mark Christie has lived on Oswald Street overlooking the Barre skyline for the last two decades. He says he intended to live in his nearly new mobile home until he retired from his career working at GlobalFoundries.

But during the deluge two weeks ago, the hill behind his home broke away, sending a cascade of mud, trees, and sand downhill and turning his home 90 degrees and crushing it like a tin can. he says he was also temporarily trapped inside. “Everything that’s in...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is an issue for each resident to decide. If you live in a flood zone, you get flooding. It’s called accountability. How can people suddenly wake up and say “oh my gosh, I didn’t know I could be flooded?” when they’ve known that from the onset. If the State of Vermont now steps in and says “you can’t live in flood zones” then many people who have planned for periodic flooding will lose the use of their property. Is that fair?

Boise Dev: 100+ apartments planned in place of McCall mobile home park

Preview:

Boise developer Michael Hormaechea submitted preliminary plans for an apartment project that would replace the McCall Manor Mobile Home Park in Valley County. 

BoiseDev told you about this 4.4-acre apartment project on Idaho Street and Ward Street earlier this spring. There are now more details about the style of units, square footage, and the total number of apartments.

The plan calls for 125 units across four buildings with a mix of one, two, and three-bedroom layouts, and a max building height of 46 feet.

“The vision for the project is to provide the community of McCall with vital, highly needed, rental apartments to support a broad...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The developer is going to put 100 apartments at $1,500 a month on a parcel that held 50 mobile homes. That’s because you can make apartments two and three stories high. Mobile home parks can only exist on on level. No way the park can compete with this income differential and clearly it has to come down.

However, the moral is that residents, governmental agencies and the media need to appreciate that mobile home parks are coming down everywhere and they better do more to make owners not want to redevelop their land.

Herald Banner: Commisioners deny developer's request to build narrower roads

Preview:

Expressing concerns and fear over safety and access to homes by emergency responders, the Hunt County Commission Court said no to a request from the developers of a proposed rural mobile home park to build narrower-than-normal streets in the development.

Engineer Levi Love and Kevin Mims, owner of the property at FM 3211 and County Road 2148 west of Greenville, asked the county for permission to build 28-foot, asphalt roads with mountable curbs instead of 34-foot wide concrete roads with curb and guttering as required in Hunt County standards.

The developers also planned to ask to be allowed to put mobile homes closer together than county...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s probably what a “hot mic” would have heard minutes before the meeting:

Alderman #1: “so how can we kill off this stupid trailer park concept?”

Alderman #2: “I know, let’s say we think that the people will block the roads with their cars and the ambulance can’t get in”.

Alderman #3: “Yeah, I like that one, but let’s also throw in about how we don’t have enough water pressure”.

Alderman #4: “I don’t care what you guys tell them, just hurry up with the vote because I don’t want to miss Pizza Night at the Eagles Club.”

Superior Telegram: Committee rejects offers for Parkland trailer park sites

Preview:

SUPERIOR — Douglas County officials are considering a different approach to selling two former mobile home parks in Parkland after one proposal and one bid fell short of the county’s requirements to get the land for free.

The Land and Development Committee rejected the offers Tuesday, July 25 to take the former Country Acres properties off the county’s hands.

The county put the property out to bid with no minimum price, but the transfer of property was contingent on an agreement and bond to ensure the trailer homes that remain on the sites are removed.

A bid by Dubesa LLC proposed paying the county $2,000 for the property with a...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Another article about a county government shutting down a park. Between owners wanting to redevelop for more profitable uses – and city/county/state governments wanting to shut them down to remove affordable housing units from their neighborhoods – mobile home parks may soon be listed as an endangered species.

The Islander Classifieds: Pines residents lack notice on trailer park sale

Preview:

Homeowners in the Pines trailer park have spoken.

Despite reports of an upcoming closing date for the sale of the Pines Trailer Park in Bradenton Beach, several Pines residents reached out to The Islander to insist they have received no official notice from the park owners or their lawyers.

David Graham, treasurer of the Pines homeowner’s association and others contacted The Islander July 25-July 29 by email, questioning a July 25 report in The Islander where a source stated a “closing is expected on or around Sept. 21.”

The Islander verified the source and their information.

“I am the treasurer of the HOA board of the park. I have been...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The buyers are paying $16,250,000 ($200,000 per lot) for a rundown park. Exactly how would this not be a redevelopment deal? The reason the residents have probably not received notice is that the owner is not going to do so until after the deal has closed. How could anyone think that there will be any other outcome? 

WENY: Clock Counting Down for Cherry Lane Park After New Agreement Executed

Preview:

SOUTHPORT, N.Y. (WENY) -- WENY News is taking a closer look at the licensing agreement between the town of Southport and Cherry Lane Park mobile home park on Sherman Avenue.

 

On July 17th, the Southport town board voted to approve a license agreement with Cherry Lane Park through December 31st, 2023. According to an agreement obtained by WENY News through a Freedom of Information request, Cherry Lane Park's owner has 10 days to apply for a demolition permit. Monday, July 31st is the tenth business day since the agreement was executed. The Southport town clerk informed WENY News there is no record on file at this time.

According...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

More nonsense about back-seat driving residents and media reporters trying to second guess complicated land development issues – kind of like me trying to critique brain surgery.

Alaska's News Source: Future of Forest Park trailer court at stake in Chugiak

Preview:

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) - The future of more than 100 residents of the Forest Park trailer court in Chugiak is at stake as a Municipality of Anchorage eviction notice is past an extension. The municipality has the ability to vacate the trailer park, said Anchorage Assembly member Kevin Cross.

The owners of the trailer park have been accused of acquiring new residents, months after the municipality issued eviction notices. Those notices, issued during the fall of 2022, were extended to April because of the impending winter. The eviction notices stem from the water system not being up to code.

“[Forest Park] had a series of water and sewer...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I know nothing about the details of this park or the allegations, but it sure looks suspicious that these bureaucrats won’t simply fix the water now, but will only invest the money if the owner sells to the residents. The optics to me makes me wonder if this is really just a case of trying to coerce this owner into this ridiculous resident-owned community dream. Wait until the residents see what the new lot rent will be once they pile debt on this property. Good luck.

autoevolution: KJE's Park-Ready Titan Tiny Home Is So Big, You Need Special Treatment for Transport

Preview:

Folks, for $105K (€95,200 at current exchange rates), you can get California's KJE Tiny Homes to craft you the massive habitat we see in the image gallery. Oh, and just for the sake of argument and the next five to ten minutes, if you haven't seen that gallery yet, now's the time to do so; it'll make everything you're about to read all that much easier to understand.

Now, if you often follow autoevolution, then you may have heard of KJE before. After all, we've covered their work on several occasions, and once you get to know the Titan, you'll understand why. Heck, ever since this crew built their first home back in 2016, they haven't...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

$105,000 for a 10’ x 30’? Seriously? That’s $300 per square foot. Maybe somebody considering this should consult Realtor.com because you can get a real house – including the land underneath – in the nicest areas of the U.S. for an average of $250 per square foot. 

KRGV: Residents of mobile home park in McAllen told to move as city moves forward with expansion of convention center

Preview:

A McAllen man has until October to leave his home of 30 years.

Pete Martinez is among the 17 homeowners who were ordered by the city of McAllen to leave the Catalina Mobile Home Park, located near the city’s convention center.

“Frankly, I don't think I am going to do it,” Martinez said. “It's all about business. They want to make money and they don't care what they do to the people… and I am tired of being pushed around"

On April 3, Martinez and other residents of the mobile home park received a letter from the city that said residents must be off the premises by October 1.

McAllen City Manager Roy Rodriguez said the city bought the...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I have to admit that I find it ironic when cities shut down parks and think they can rationalize it with flowery prose:

McAllen City Manager Roy Rodriguez said the city bought the property three years ago for expansion purposes. “We are expanding the campus for the McAllen Convention Center and outside festivities like MXLAN, this weekend is a perfect example of how we are expanding the facility,” Rodriguez said. “We are ready to start attempting to develop it”

I guess all park owners can learn from this and use the old Teddy Roosevelt phrase when the media calls “we shall endeavor to persevere” with property redevelopment.

Vermont Public: Manufactured homes condemned at flood-battered Berlin park. What now?

Preview:

This story, by Report for America corps member Carly Berlin, was produced through a partnership between VTDigger and Vermont Public.

For the last two weeks, residents of the Berlin Mobile Home Park have scattered across Vermont, crashing with friends and family after finding their homes devastated by record flooding. On Friday, many learned that their houses have been officially condemned.

The condemnation notices, issued by the state’s Division of Fire Safety after inspections earlier this week, could serve as an important tool in helping park residents recoup their losses from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. After Tropical...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This article pretty much exemplifies that the worst thing you can probably hear is “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”.

My Edmonds News: The new law giving mobile home residents a chance to buy their parks

Preview:

A mobile home park in Moses Lake is up for sale and a new state law assures residents a shot at buying the property.

In the past they might’ve never known it was on the market until after it was sold.

Owners of North Pointe notified residents on July 17 that they are looking to sell the 25-space  mobile home park.

This started the clock on a process providing those living there and eligible organizations approved by the state Department of Commerce an opportunity to compete with other potential buyers.

That chance is etched into a law that took effect Sunday and is intended to help preserve this stock of affordable housing.

Until now,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The residents rarely have the ability to come up with the money on these ridiculous first-option rules. The odds are about as large as a meteorite hitting the title company. Just read the article itself. Here’s the proof:

“There are now 24 resident-owned communities in Washington and roughly 300 across the country, she said”

Here’s a reality check. There are around 44,000 mobile home parks in the U.S. There are around 300 resident-owned communities. That’s .0.0068% probability that they pull it off. Or conversely a 99.32% chance they can’t. Is that really worth the delay these first-option rules require? Clearly not. Then why pass such nonsense? Because it panders to the voting base and most voters are too stupid to know the actual math.

The Press Democrat: 2 Petaluma mobile home parks are threatening to close, but there’s a lot that comes first

Preview:

In the wake of Petaluma moving to tighten rent control and other protections in its mobile home parks, two park owners have now signaled they may shut down, potentially upending the lives of hundreds.

At the 78-unit Little Woods Mobile Villa and the 102-unit Youngstown Mobile Home Park, residents received letters this month announcing a “potential closure.” A consultant, hired to assess the impact of such a move, began appearing on doorsteps.

It was the second shock for mobile homeowners at Youngstown where less than two weeks prior, they received another notice saying the park would no longer be restricted to older residents.

Concern,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s the key quote from this article:

“In the wake of Petaluma moving to tighten rent control and other protections in its mobile home parks, two park owners have now signalled they may shut down”.

The writer then goes on to point out how this will destroy hundreds of residents’ lives who can find no place even remotely as cheap to live.

OK, now who is then responsible for those folks being homeless? The group that passes the rent control. Their vote effectively signalled the death warrant for these properties. And they won’t be alone. I’m sure that other parks in Petaluma will follow their lead and redevelop into different uses.

I’ve written for nearly 20 years about the fact that rent control equals park redevelopment. It’s never going to change. Want to eliminate mobile home parks in your city/county/state? Simple solution: just pass rent control.

TB News Watch: Sale of mobile home park remains on table

Preview:

THUNDER BAY — A controversial proposal to sell a city-owned mobile home park remains on the table after city council voted to receive more information on the issue.

Residents at Hillcourt Estates will now wait until March of next year to learn whether the city will move forward with a sale.

Council made the decision on a narrow 7-5 vote after a debate charged with concerns over the availability of affordable housing in the city.

Hillcourt residents have vocally opposed a sale, submitting a petition bearing over 400 signatures.

Presenting to council on Monday alongside other residents, Mandy Bruyere called municipal ownership a win-win,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s one of the classic quotes of all time regarding this city-owned park:

“We’re making over $170,000 a year, so if any private developer would come in, I imagine they would maintain their asset the same way we would,” he said.

For those who have little math skills – which this bureaucrat hopes applies to residents of the park -- $170,000 per year in net income at a 6% cap rate works out to only $2,800,000. Do you think that a big piece of land near the waterfront in Ontario, Canada might be worth a little more than $2,800,000?

Here’s how this is really going to work out. The city is going to sell the property to a developer and they will swiftly tear it down to build apartments. The city removes all of the cost the park inflicts on the city (school tuition, uninsured hospital visits, etc.), improves the drive-up appeal of the neighborhood, and gets out from under the tough job of managing a mobile home park. And everyone knows it, regardless of what they may say at city council meetings.

Independent Tribune: WeBuild: Why we can't wait on affordable housing

Preview:

The old guard in any society resents new methods, for old guards wear the decorations and medals won by waging battle in the accepted manner.” — Martin Luther King Jr., Why We Can’t Wait

Over the last 18 months, the evolution of WeBuild Concord as a nonprofit housing developer has created greater urgency for affordable housing, systems change, and a framework for Concord and Cabarrus County. WeBuild and its partners currently have 14 single-family, multi-family, NOAH (naturally occurring affordable housing), and mixed-use housing projects under construction or in the permit process comprising over 60 homes. As a relatively new entity...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Am I the only one or doesn’t this program sound like the old “company store” from the 19th century where miners and manufacturing workers were not paid in U.S. currency but in credits they could only use at the “company store” and had no actual monetary value? In this case, you buy a stick-built home with real cash and yet all you get is a 99-year land lease under which you can only sell your home back to this “land trust” and after 99-years – if you don’t sell – they can just take it back for free. Since the whole point of home ownership is to gain equity as home prices increase, they are effectively neutering the ability to profit from home ownership. Bad deal for the buyers, in my opinion.

Sky-Hi News: Letter to the editor: Kremmling mobile home park sees rent, water and sewage cost increases

Preview:

Over the weekend at least two Denver TV stations ran stories about a woman who has filed a complaint against the owners of the mobile home park where she lives, citing rate increases and changes to policies that have made life there a challenge. 

Not everyone is aware, but what used to be Rayner’s Trailer Park and is now called Estates at the Bluff, has been purchased in recent months by investors from Texas. The first change came when water meters were installed on all the homes, so we would start paying for our own water and sewer services.
Now our rent is going up $150 a month the first of August a prohibitive amount for most of...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Great letter to the media from this owner when they were accused of raising rent and ruining the park:
When contacted, Brett Garner, the park manager until recently, responded in writing, citing some of the options.

“1. We can leave the community as it is, not pursue improvements, and leave lots rents close to where they were.”  “2. Increase the quality of the community by adding the lots on the east end, connect the existing community to the newly installed water and sewer pipe (planned for next summer), repave the roads (planned for July 2023), add a recreation area on the north side of the park, and clean up the look of the community so that it’s more desirable for you and all residents to live in. We chose to go with option two because, in our eyes, it’s what’s best for our immediate community (Estates at The Bluff) and the community at large (Kremmling).“

There’s no question that in any 100-space park there are probably 2 people who can’t afford to pay more rent and want to live in squalor if that’s the cheapest option. But the majority don’t agree and the key to running a business is to please the majority of your customers, not some tiny fringe faction.