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Visual Capitalist: Modular Housing vs. Traditional Housing: How Do They Compare?

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Modular Housing vs. Traditional Housing: How Do They Compare?

The U.S. needs new houses. Lots of them. 

With housing prices nearing six times annual incomes, increasing supply is a must if there is any hope of bringing down house prices, and modular housing could be the solution.

This visualization is the third and final piece of the Reimagining Home Series from our sponsor Boxabl, where we compare the benefits of modular housing against traditional construction methods. Let’s start with the basics.

What Is Modular Housing?

Modular homes are built offsite, in standardized sections, usually in a factory setting. They are then transported...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The big problem with modular homes is found right in the article: they only cost 25% less than traditional stick-built homes.That’s just not a big enough discount to outweigh the stigma. I think you’d have to be at around 50% off to make the average American consider it.

WFLA: Surviving the storm: How safe is your mobile home?

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IONA, Fla. (WFLA) —People who live in mobile homes, especially older ones, and choose to remain at home when a major storm threatens are at a much greater risk for damage and personal injury.

Bonzy Galor chose to ride out Hurricane Ian, with its 150 mile per hour winds, and 10-to-15-foot storm surge, in her mobile home. “We could not move,” she recalls, “all the totes started floating, everything was under water.” Wind and water tore their home apart.

The insurance institute of business and home safety tests mobile homes, and concludes new building techniques to make buildings safer, but how new? “IBHS tests prove newer manufactured...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’m sorry but there’s no form of real estate that can survive 150 mph winds – which is the benchmark in this article. Mobile homes do just about as well as most things, but a windowless concrete bunker is the only way you’re going to survive a 150 mph sustained wind without ending up being thrown a couple miles.

Delaware Public Media: Delaware Manufactured Home Relocation Authority extends benefits to residents of immobile RVs

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A legal battle over evictions at the Pine Haven manufactured home park in Lincoln prompts Delaware’s Manufactured Home Relocation Authority to refine some of its policies regarding residents of recreational vehicles — a less-common form of housing in Delaware's manufactured home communities.

The Authority is responsible for managing a trust fund, paid into by both the owners of manufactured home parks and manufactured homeowners, which is used to provide financial assistance to cover the cost of moving or demolishing a manufactured home.

For residents of Pine Haven, some of whom received eviction notices from the park's new owners last...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This wins the prize for dumbest article of the week: What in the heck is an “immobile” RV? Even the bureaucrats can’t actually define it as it doesn’t actually exist. They might just as well offer housing assistance if you provide a photo of Big Foot.

My Record Journal: Housing advocates say Connecticut is lagging in small home development

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MERIDEN — As Carabetta Companies wind down conversion of an obsolete trailer park into a small home development on Broad Street, housing advocates say the state lags behind others in this type of development. 

Realtor Alexa Kebalo Hughes of the Connecticut Realtors Association lives in a small cabin in Colebrook. The property has several small cabins on 350 acres. Kebalo Hughes said she doesn’t expect the attraction to tiny homes to slow down anytime soon.

“There’s a massive trend towards smaller homes and storage unit conversions for both residential and commercial throughout the nation,” Kebalo Hughes said. 

“The best approach to solve...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Connect the dots from the articles so far – this is the second one in which a mobile home park is being demolished and replaced with an equal number of tiny stick-built homes. If that concept heats up, then you will see a lot more parks be bulldozed as this is a win/win for all involved. I looked at doing this myself to my park in Grapevine, Texas 25 years ago, but sold the park instead. As the demand for smaller, affordable stick-built homes heats up, this is a quick development fix as all the utilities are already there and all you have to do is start pouring foundations and getting the mobile homes out. The big problem is that you can only rent – rather than sell – these stick-built homes, so the “parking lot” business model is out the door. However, some cities have allowed the park to be re-platted into individual lots and they then can be sold off.

I thought it was interesting how the developer has coined a new name for this type of development, calling it “innovate housing” and eliminating any reference to tiny homes. Nobody wants to be reminded that they live in a tiny home – it’s kind of insulting.

Star Tribune: Residents at Lake Elmo mobile home park say owner has forgotten them

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Faced with what they describe as steep rent increases, a drop in services and poor management, the residents of a Lake Elmo mobile home park say it's too much: They want help.

The renters and homeowners in the 450-site Cimarron Park and Golf Course have formed a Resident's Association and teamed up with an attorney from the nonprofit Housing Justice Center to explore legal options in the face of worsening conditions, said resident Brey Mafi.

"When I moved in, I quickly realized I got sold a bill of goods," Mafi said, echoing other residents who say the owner, Chicago-based Equity Lifestyle Properties, has squeezed the park's operations...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Look, I understand that the residents don’t like the rent going from around $700 per month to $900 per month over a five-year period (which is actually only about the rate of inflation) but NOBODY IS GOING TO BELIEVE THAT EQUITY LIFESTYLE IS NOT PROPERLY MAINTAINING THE PROPERTY. ELS is one of the best operators in the industry – and the largest owner – and they are known for exemplary property condition. I’m willing to bet $100 that if I flew out to that property right now it would be immaculate and everything the residents claim is completely false. This would be like a Kansas City Chiefs fan claiming that ticket prices have doubled (which is true) and the Chiefs are a lousy team that don’t deserve those higher ticket prices (clearly not true). Why can’t these people just be honest and say “I’m mad because my rent went up $40 a year for the past five years”? And then, if they are that mad, just move someplace cheaper and stop whining about it? As soon as the people named in this article get both sides of the story (and visit the property) they will know who’s telling the truth (ELS) and who is not (the residents).

Newswires: Despite DOE Delay Manufactured Housing Energy Standards Remain Unacceptable as Costs Continue to Increase, per MHARR

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Manufactured Housing Association Updates MHI-TMHA v DOE Case # 1:23-cv-00174 in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas.

 
By mandating IECC as the base energy code for manufactured housing, section 413 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) would fundamentally undermine the manufactured housing market”
— Mark Weiss, J.D., President and CEO of MHARR.

WASHINGTON, D.C., UNITED STATES, May 25, 2023/EINPresswire.com/ -- In a statement to manufactured home industry professionals, affordable housing advocates, public officials, and others following the affordable housing crisis, the Manufactured...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you haven’t been following this story, the U.S. Government is trying to cram down crazy environmentalist rules on mobile home manufacturing that will make the cost of mobile homes go up and the energy savings to customers go down an incredibly tiny percent that in no way justifies that extra home cost. We all know that the mobile home manufacturers will lose this battle (as all industries have in the Biden era) and then the rules will be reversed by the next administration before they even come into effect. So it’s just hard to get too worked up over it. 

Health Affairs: The Environmental Justice Challenge No One Is Talking About

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The past few years have witnessed a societal reckoning with income, class, and racial disparities, particularly as they relate to health and well-being. A number of multisector collaborations with a focus on environmental justice and social determinants of health have sprouted up and are leveraging advocacy, philanthropy, and governmental policy to address these intersectional issues. While these efforts are far-reaching in their pursuit of addressing historical inequity, one particularly vulnerable group has been overlooked—residents of manufactured home communities (MHCs).

Colloquially known as mobile home parks or trailer parks, MHCs...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’m hoping that this was written by AI as it contains more inaccuracies than a mere mortal could assemble. Here are just a sampling of the facts that are incorrect:

  • Berkshire Hathaway does not own any mobile home parks – they only own manufacturing and financing.
  • There are not 22 million Americans living in mobile home parks. With only 44,000 mobile home parks in the U.S. that would be an average of 500 lots per park. The actual stat is around 22 million people living in mobile homes which includes those living in parks and (as an even larger group) those who live in mobile homes on their own land.
  • The majority of mobile home parks are not built on floodplain – those that are represent a minority.
  • And on, and on, and on

Then, after all this incorrect nonsense that is portrayed as fact, the purpose of the article is apparently to complain that mobile home parks are environmentally goofy … and you just lose interest and go to the next article. It’s kind of like a movie that is advertised as an action flick but turns out to be a documentary on AOC. 

Kitsap Sun: Assistance pledged to Poulsbo Mobile Home Park repairs now dedicated to rent relief

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North Kitsap Fishline plans to refocus $30,000 initially intended for property improvements at Poulsbo Mobile Home Park toward rent relief for individual households.

Just more than a week after a community meeting that was set up to discuss the distribution of funds for home repairs and ease fears of eviction for residents at the park, North Kitsap Fishline announced the assistance will be used to reduce July rent payments.

The May 18 meeting, which followed a Poulsbo City Council vote to allocate $15,000 in city funds to help residents with physical repairs, revealed not all park residents had received inspection reports from park...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Spending $500 per household is hardly worthy of this much fanfare – most mobile home park buyers spend far more than this on home renovations and clean-up. Only most park owners never get credit for it.

Explorer: Town seeks opinions on housing needs

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Town officials are urging Oro Valley residents, nonresidents who work in Oro Valley, and owners of businesses within the community to take one of two 10-minute online surveys about the town’s current and future housing needs.

The surveys, conducted by consultant WestGroup Research, are part of the town’s first comprehensive housing study. Surveys opened May 9, and remain available online through Wednesday, May 31. Oro Valley wants to “ensure everyone has an opportunity” to share their views, it said in a release.

“We need all folks to participate in the survey,” said Bayer Vella, the town’s planning manager. “There are so many folks in...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I love it when bureaucrats waste time and money on studies like this. Here’s the answer for free: the people of Tucson want 7,000 sq. ft. mansions on a budget of $30 a month. What a bunch of idiots. That’s like asking 4th graders what they want for lunch at school. 

The New York Times: Inside Montauk’s Luxurious ‘Trailer Park’

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On a recent May evening, Janet O’Brien served up Old-Fashioneds and tequilas on ice to friends at her Montauk home. The conversational menu featured what one might expect for a tony Hamptons cocktail hour: past and upcoming trips to Morocco, Manhattanites bragging about rarely stepping foot in Brooklyn and gossip about how much neighbors spent on renovations.

The setting is perhaps the interesting part: Ms. O’Brien’s home is in what they all call “a trailer park.”

Montauk Shores, the roughly 200-unit manufactured home community that overlooks Ditch Plains Beach, isn’t what immediately comes to mind when one thinks of a trailer park. The...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There is some part of society that celebrates taking conspicuous consumption to a new level. Paying $3.5 million for a 800 square foot mobile home is not prestigious or cool -- it’s just plain stupid. Wasting money does not make you a big shot, spending it wisely is what makes you superior. Think of everything that could have been done with that $3.5 million to benefit others. You could buy 10 people a debt-free home, for example, or put 20 people through college.

KSAT: Mobile home co-op plan poised to get city bond funding

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San Antonio – The City of San Antonio plans to use part of its first housing bond to help create the city’s first mobile home park cooperative.

As part of the second round of proposals to use bond and federal dollars, city staff on Wednesday recommended helping fund a plan to purchase a South Side mobile home park and convert it into a co-op. That means the tenants of the 56-site Riverside Terrace on Mission Road would then own the park themselves and have the authority to set rents and make any improvements.

City staff recommended approving a little less than $2.9 million of the $150 million housing bond as well as $250,000 in fee...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The tenants are buying this park for around $100,000 per lot. Clearly the seller has no problem with that. But I don’t think these residents realize what they’re getting into. To service that much debt, the rents are going to go up – way up. “Maybe not today or tomorrow but soon and for the rest of their lives” as Humphrey Bogart would say. To think that this transaction is going to keep rents low is a fallacy. It’s called math.

KTVB7: Mobile home owner seeks compensation after getting eviction notice

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BOISE, Idaho — For more than a decade, Gary Gallipeau has called Dee Mar Mobile Home Park home.

The Garden City park was established in the 70s. Fifty years later, developers are reimagining and revamping the land into multi-family housing apartments.

Gallipeau said everyone living at the park got eviction notices in January.

“[The developers] even offered us a deal,” he said. “For every month early that we moved out, they would refund us two months of rent, but we had to take our trailers.”

But Gallipeau said moving those mobile homes is more difficult than it seems. Only about three or four of Dee Mar’s mobile homes were built...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s a new take on the “victim” mentality that all American appear to share. In 1976 HUD kidnapped the mobile home manufacturing industry and declared that any home that did not have a HUD seal could not be brought into a mobile home park. Now they’re closing down Dee Mar and the pre-HUD homes can’t be relocated and the tenants are blaming the park owner for this.

At the end of the day, Gallipeau is less concerned about moving out and more concerned about not getting compensated. He said some of the trailers are valued at upwards of $80,000. “There’s no fair or just compensation for property that we own,” he said. “The developers own the land, we own the trailers.”

The fact that owners of pre-HUD homes do not know (or even research) the ability to relocate a pre-HUD home is not the responsibility of the park owner. If this tenant wants to sue anyone, the appropriate party would be HUD. Good luck on that.

Because of this reality, that’s one more reason that mobile home park rents need to go up in-line with market forces as the problems at Dee Mar on relocating homes will be shared with any park that is redeveloped.

One final note: don’t try to tell me a pre-HUD home is worth $80,000. Nobody is buying that.

Florida Today: How Brevard can tackle its affordable housing problem | Opinion

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Are there solutions to a Space Coast housing situation where many believe a shot at decent, affordable housing slips further away?

That was the main issue this week at Brevard County’s inaugural “Affordable House Summit: Foundations for the Future of Housing on Florida’s Space Coast.”

Community leaders opened a countywide public discussion on what to do about a housing condition ― and one not unique to the Space Coast ― that price low-income, and even moderate-income, individuals and families out of a stable and decent place to live.

More than 200 people attended the all-day summit in Cocoa Village, where a roster of speakers,...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Amber Caroll, director of the Brevard Homeless Coalition: “There is hope. There is hope. And the hope is here in this room.”

Maybe these folks should read the military officer handbook titled “Hope Is Not a Method”. The army found that one of the worst leadership traits is spouting out “hope” as opposed to reality-based action plans.

You cannot build an affordable home in the U.S. today, because construction costs plus lot costs equals $300,000 and up. “Hoping” you can accomplish that is just a waste of time. The only way to provide a detached dwelling at under $300,000 is a mobile home park. Period.

Sea Coast Online: Portsmouth board allows new mobile home without city director's process

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PORTSMOUTH — The city Zoning Board of Adjustment voted to allow the owner of a 1960s-era mobile home in the Oriental Gardens park to replace it with a new home without getting a variance.

The board’s vote came late Tuesday night, after city Planning Director Peter Britz recently declined to grant a building permit for the new mobile home.

Britz had also ruled the owner of the mobile home at 210 Oriental Gardens would need to get a variance from the board first, before replacing the existing home.

John Kuzinevich, the attorney representing Salem Manufactured Homes LLC, the company seeking to sell the new home to the park resident, said the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Classic tale of a city bureaucrat not understanding zoning law and, when a lawyer goes above their head, is immediately overruled and the mobile home is approved.

Anna Maria Island Sun: Pines Trailer Park purchase offer accepted

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BRADENTON BEACH – A May 8 letter Largo-based attorney David Luczak sent to the Pines Trailer Park Homeowners Association board members addresses the sale of the waterfront mobile home park. The accepted purchase offer appears to give the Pines Trailer Park’s permanent and seasonal residents at least five years to remain in their mobile homes and make their future plans.

The pending sale follows the Pines Trailer Park residents’ unsuccessful efforts to form a co-op and raise enough money to purchase the mobile home park owned by Richard and William Jackson’s Jackson Partnership LLLP.

Luczak’s letter begins by saying, “As you know, this...

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Our thoughts on this story:

As I recall, this was the park in which the residents tried to buy it under their first option and only raised $4,000 of the $16 million purchase price over a period of months. Was anyone surprised? To match the offer the tenants would have had to put up $1 million in earnest money on day one. Give me a break.

Kitsap Sun: Meeting with residents changes timeline of aid distribution, reveals rent increases

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North Kitsap Fishline will postpone the distribution of $30,000 in funds pledged last week to help residents Poulsbo Mobile Home Park conduct repairs, after dialogue between residents and property managers revealed a delay in distributing inspection reports to tenants.

Intending to provide relief to residents who recently received violation notices requiring them to complete a series of external repairs within an initial 20 days, the City of Poulsbo organized a community meeting, held Thursday at Poulsbo Mobile Home Park on Lincoln Road, to start the process of distributing funds. Poulsbo's city council committed $15,000 from an...

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Our thoughts on this story:

At the May 3 Poulsbo City Council meeting, Councilmember Gary McVey told Josh Brooks and Shah, “We will take you at your word that you are not sprucing the place up to raise rents exorbitantly or to evict people who don't deserve to be so. We will hold you to that…”

And with those words the IQ of the entire room fell 10 points. Obviously, making the property nice should result in higher rents. Mobile home park lot rents are ridiculously low and until you break the $1,000 per month barrier in most markets (but not LA, Denver and others) you are not exorbitant. And park owners never evict people who do not need to be removed, as it costs a park owner about $5,000 in costs to evict a tenant when you factor in vacancy and home renovations.

San Antonio Report: City Council poised to approve 14 more affordable housing projects funded by 2022 bond

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The City of San Antonio has selected another 14 affordable housing projects to receive $32.1 million from the local housing bond and some federal grants.

If approved, the funding would be used toward building or rehabilitating more than 2,100 housing units in the coming years. The projects were presented to City Council on Wednesday.

“I would argue there’s only one thing that supersedes excitement of the Spurs getting the No. 1 draft pick — and it’s this presentation,” Councilwoman Teri Castillo (D5) said. “Everyone deserves access to quality, safe, affordable housing.”

City Council is slated to vote on the latest batch of projects on...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There are 44,000 mobile home parks in the U.S. The residents own 300 of these. That’s .0068 of all parks. Focusing on that initiative is hardly the way to accomplish the goal of helping affordable housing. Devoting millions of dollars for 55 residents to buy their own park is not nearly as smart as spending that same money to act as grants to fix roads, pipes and other infrastructure at many, many parks. Let’s be honest, this has nothing to do with the public good. This is simply virtue signaling by the City of San Antonio.

Effingham Herald: Guyton to amend code regarding manufactured and modular homes

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The City of Guyton issued a press release May 18.

To quell the rumors and misinformation surrounding the potential changes to the City Zoning code regarding manufactured housing and modular homes, The following information is important:

1. The City is not making manufactured or modular homes illegal.

2. The City is not taking away existing manufactured or modular homes.

3. The City will not prevent homeowners from replacing an existing manufactured or modular home.

 4. The City will not prevent homeowners from repairing their property or require approval to do so.

The current proposed changes to the code will do the following:

1. Property...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Guyon, Georgia has a new idea. They will require a Special Use Permit for each and every new mobile home to enter any mobile home park in the city. But this should not be considered a way for them to keep mobile home tenants from moving in but instead because “It allows the community the opportunity to participate in the future of their neighborhoods”.

Yeah, right.

Let’s see how that holds up in court.

The Press Democrat: Problems at your mobile home park? Here’s how to alert California officials

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Mobile home parks offer some of the cheapest housing to the most vulnerable Californians. But advocates say these parks often fall into disrepair because of their old age, vulnerability to climate hazards and lax oversight.

The California Housing and Community Development Department monitors health and safety at most of these parks, and depends largely on mobile home residents to file complaints to find out about problems and urge owners to fix them.

A five-month CalMatters investigation found most park residents don’t know how to file a complaint or fear what could happen if they do. We took the most common questions we heard from park...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s how it works in the real world: 1) file your complaint with the State of California 2) get some bureaucrat to go out to the park and find 1,000 problems with every square inch of it 3) notify the park owner that they need to do 160,000 repairs 4) park owner calls the local real estate broker and puts the land on the market for redevelopment 5) buyer makes an offer 5) park owner accepts it 6) developer requests mutli-family zoning and gets it immediately 7) park owner terminates all leases 8) park becomes 100 high-end apartment units and 9) the tenant who filed with the State of California cries and says “I don’t know how this all happened”. The winners in this story: 1) the park owner 2) the developer 3) the new 100 apartment residents 4) the city government and 5) the neighboring community. The loser: the tenants in the park.

The scariest words in the English language are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”.

Ideastream Public Media: Euclid Beach Mobile Home Park supporters stage another protest to save homes

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Holding protest signs including “Fund our community, not our displacement,” about 10 supporters of the Euclid Beach Mobile Home Park demonstrated outside of a Western Reserve Land Conservancy fundraiser at the conservancy’s Moreland Hills headquarters Friday morning.

The conservancy, which owns the land where the mobile home park sits in Cleveland’s Collinwood neighborhood, announced in February that more than 100 mobile home residents would have to move to make way for a new public park. Since then, United Residents of Euclid Beach (UREB) — a resident’s union with about 40 members — and the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Do you seriously think that Cleveland needed this piece of land so bad to make way for a city park that they just had to evict those 100 park residents? Obviously, the truth is probably that Cleveland wanted to get this park torn down because it’s unsightly and costing the city a fortune in school tuition, hospital stays, and public programs. That’s like when the hotel says that it’s not going to wash your towels or sheets to save the environment from toxic chemicals.

The Durango Herald: How Lightner Creek tested Colorado’s Mobile Home Park Act

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When about 85 residents lost water for two months in the Lightner Creek Mobile Home Park earlier this year west of Durango, there was little anyone could do.

Two days after the Feb. 13 outage, the park’s owner, Darlene Mann, received a cease-and-desist order from Christina Postolowski, manager of the Mobile Home Park Oversight Program. The order compelled Mann to comply with the various sections of the Mobile Home Park Act by repairing the water system, providing water to residents until service was restored, repairing a blocked sewer line and fully cleaning up a spill of raw sewage on park property.

When Mann did not comply with the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The average park owner does not have access to the $30 trillion credit line of the U.S. government. Asking an elderly park owner to chip in $5,000 per day, for water alone, for 60 days totals $300,000. And that does not even cover the cost to replace the water lines. So what’s the solution? Do you think there’s a higher use for this land in Durango, Colorado? Are you serious? In this case, a park buyer took the property over and saved it from the wrecking ball. But in 9 out of 10 cases, this park would be torn down and made into a more profitable use. What should have happened differently? The state should have supplied the water and fixed the water lines and prayed that the stress of the situation alone would not have coerced the seller into calling a land broker. The article confirms that if the park was resident-owned the state would have provided grants or low-cost loans immediately to do just that. Since tenants own nearly zero parks in Colorado, the state might want to think about changing that program requirement.

Democrat Gazette: Trailer park razing a concern in U.S.

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PHOENIX -- The razing of older mobile home parks across the United States worries advocates who say bulldozing them permanently eliminates some of the already limited housing for the poorest of the poor.

A recent survey by the National Low Income Housing Coalition showed a U.S.-wide shortage of 7.3 million affordable rental homes for extremely low-income renters, defined in Arizona as a three-member household making $28,850 or less.

"Mobile homes are a much bigger part of our affordable housing stock than people know," said Mark Stapp, who directs Arizona State University's master's degree program in real estate development. "Once it's...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Bingo.

 

At least six such communities have been torn down in Arizona in the last 18 months, he said, adding that Grand Canyon University "bent over backwards" to help residents more than other park owners."A lot of these parks are 70 years old," said Anderson, noting an uptick in demolitions of older communities for redevelopment. "It's going to be a big problem down the line."

 

So people are starting to have second thoughts about the importance of making sure that more parks don’t get town down. Easy solution. HIGHER LOT RENTS. You don’t need an academic study.

KOLO: Can’t afford to stay or leave: Local mobile home owners’ dilemma

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SPARKS, Nev. (KOLO) -In many ways, Jeanneil Marzan is a typical resident of her seniors-only mobile home park in Sparks.

She’s owned her manufactured home for 10 years, and for all those years she’s shouldered the responsibilities of any homeowner. Her home and others nearby are well kept.

Although she owns and maintains the structure, someone else owns the ground it sits on and her landlord has just changed. In December, the park was bought by an investment group, the Carlisle Corporation.

They’ve raised the rent for new residents. She pays $790 a month. Someone moving in across the street would pay just over a thousand, but there are no...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This article is so stupid that its own conclusion negates it.

So, they are tied to a home they own and can’t move, facing added expense if they stay, leaving with a fraction of its worth if they choose to move on. “So, if I want to sell my house for probably half what I should get for it, then where do I go?” asks Marzan. “What else is affordable here that we could get into?”

The article starts off saying that higher lot rents make mobile home prices go down, as the potential home buyer has less cash flow to work with. Then it ends with the fact that they bought the mobile home, not for appreciation potential, but because it’s the cheapest thing in town. You can’t have it both ways. I know of no asset that is both cheap and appreciates wildly. If I go buy a car at a used car lot and say “what’s the cheapest thing you’ve got” I’ll end up with a 1985 Ford Taurus. Not a 1985 Ferrari. And that Taurus will have zero chance of ever being a collectible classic. If I buy the car that will appreciate – the Ferrari – it will cost as much as the ten cheapest cars combined.

So don’t go around telling me that anyone lives in mobile homes because they view that as an appreciating asset. They live in mobile homes because they represent the only shot at insanely cheap living. If you want a house that appreciates in value, the average single-family home costs $400,000 – that’s 100 times what many mobile homes sell for.

Daily Montanan: Gianforte vetoes mobile homes park bill, CPS reform, among other legislation

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Gov. Greg Gianforte vetoed a bill that would have given protections for mobile home park residents, like requiring park owners give 60 days notice before taking action like increasing rent.

House Bill 889 is among more than a dozen other proposals to get rejected by the governor, including a bill for reforms to Child Protective Services and another bill requiring the state health department to issue reports of abuse from the state hospital.

Gianforte said in his veto letter Tuesday that House Bill 889 “increases regulation of mobile home parks, disincentivizes landlords from maintaining or increasing the inventory of mobile home rental...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The Governor of Montana is this week’s Smartest Guy in the Room:

Gianforte said in his veto letter Tuesday that House Bill 889 “increases regulation of mobile home parks, disincentivizes landlords from maintaining or increasing the inventory of mobile home rental lots, and, in general, compromises the property rights of mobile home park owners.”

He must be an avid reader of this weekly publication as he fully understands that making mobile home parks a pain to own results in them being redeveloped into other uses. As tenants try to put burdens on park owners that are not in-line with American property laws, they set in motion the park owner selling the land for a different – and more porofitable – use.

Go Skagit: Low-income tenants lack options as old mobile home parks are razed

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PHOENIX (AP) — Alondra Ruiz Vazquez and her husband were comfortable in Periwinkle Mobile Home Park for a decade, feeling lucky to own their mobile home and pay about $450 a month for their lot in a city with spiraling rents.

But now they and dozens of other families have until May 28 to leave the Phoenix park, which nearby Grand Canyon University purchased seven years ago to build student housing. Two other mobile home communities are also being cleared this spring for new developments in a city where no new parks have been built in more than 30 years.

“I'm here, well, because I have nowhere to go,” said Isabel Ramos, who lives at...

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Our thoughts on this story:

OK, let’s cut the B.S. Periwinkle Mobile Home Park is being torn down because student housing for Grand Canyon University is more profitable than a trailer park with $450 rents. The seller of the park weighed the offer from Grand Canyon University to what he was making with the park and the student housing offer was higher. How high would the lot rent have needed to be to make the Grand Canyon offer lower than the park was worth? I don’t know, but maybe $700 per month would have done the trick. That’s the issue that needs to be discussed in order to save parks from the wrecking ball. The question should not be “how can the park owner keep the rents ridiculously low” but instead “how high do the rents need to be to keep the park a park?” I’ve been preaching for a decade that the only thing that’s going to keep mobile home parks alive is much, much higher rents. If you don’t accept this, you’re an idiot.