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Longmont Leader: Polis Administration, DOLA announce funding for Mobile Home Park Resident Empowerment Program

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Governor Polis and the Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) announced that DOLA’s Division of Housing (DOH), Office of Housing Finance and Sustainability (OHFS) granted more than $28 million to three loan program administrators for the Mobile Home Park Resident Empowerment Program (MHPREP). 

“This important support helps residents purchase the land their homes are on, and we are excited to continue the important work to make sure Coloradans have access to safe and affordable housing,” said Gov. Polis. 

SB22-160 establishes a revolving loan and grant program to provide assistance and financing to mobile home owners seeking to...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’m all for these type of programs – we have sold several parks to the residents so far – but can we all admit how few properties this benefits in the end? Residents in the entire U.S. only buy about 20 or 30 parks a year. Wouldn’t this money be better served if every mobile home park got a grant to build a pavilion, charcoal grills, playground, and nicer entrance? That would benefit ten times more people for the same money. I’m not sure what this obsession is with the residents buying the land underneath their mobile homes, but it does nothing to stop rents from increasing, if that’s the myth that people are counting on. I don’t have any stats, but I know of parks that have significantly higher rents under resident-owned scenarios as they then have to contend with covering the rising costs of everything from insurance to property tax, as well as try to pay a crushing monthly mortgage.

Post Independent: Residents of Glenwood-area mobile home park preparing to buy land after nonprofit intermediary takes ownership

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After an eventful first few weeks for the new nonprofit owners of the 3-Mile Mobile Home Park outside Glenwood Springs, residents are now in the early stages of organizing to take possession of the land beneath their homes.

Just days after the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation (RFCDC) closed on the purchase of the 20-space park along 3 Mile Creek on April 27, the Manaus-led organization found itself dealing with potential flooding from the spring runoff.

Thirty-year park resident and head of park maintenance Felix Jimenez would end his long days managing the irrigation system at a local ranch and return to the park to keep an...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Not to sound like the Grinch but the non-profit spent $2.4 million on a dirt-road 20 space park, and are looking at spending maybe $600,000 more in infrastructure repair. That’s $150,000 per household spent so that they can continue to live in a dirt-road trailer park. Would it not make more sense to buy each household a debt-free stick-built house in another state? Would that not be infinitely better than what they ended up with? I’m all for programs that benefit those in need, but I’m afraid that the virtue-signaling this non-profit was after exceeded common sense.

M Live: Wallet Watch: Hedge fund ‘like a shadow’ buying Michigan mobile home parks

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A hedge fund has found a new venture: mobile home parks.

Mobile homeowners across Michigan say rents jumped, maintenance declined and it became nearly impossible to move after their communities came under new ownership. Each park has been purchased by a different LLC, but breadcrumbs trail back to a $1 billion New York-based hedge fund called Alden Global Capital.

Suzanne Clevenger, 64, says conditions have worsened at River Springs Estates since she moved into a doublewide with her husband seven years ago. A flood devastated the Berrien Springs park in 2018. And now she says broken pipes have been a problem for two years – sewage...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Let’s break this article down into components:

  1. The residents claim that a $390 per month lot rent in Hastings, Michigan is “insanely high”. A quick trip to Bestplaces.net proves out that the median home price in Hastings is $281,400 and the average three-bedroom apartment rent is $1,530 per month. Therefore, clearly, the tenants’ claim is BOGUS.
  2. The tenants claim that the rent has gone up since the private equity group bought the property. TRUE. And that the quality of the maintenance has declined. BOGUS. They have no examples of this supposed “decline” in maintenance of the property, but I know from experience that a private equity group ALWAYS runs the park they buy better than mom and pop did. 
  3. The writer claims that private equity groups are destroying the wonderful quality of Michigan mobile home parks. BOGUS. These groups are, in fact, the only pioneers bringing these old parks back to life.
  4. As with what we see every week, new owners raise rents and fix up parks and marginal tenants (maybe 1%) are willing to live in total squalor rather than pay $100 per month more. Nobody agrees with this philosophy except this strange tiny slice of the tenant pie. BOGUS.

Can AI PLEASE hurry up and put all these woke journalists out of their jobs? Any computer would instinctively know that there are two sides to every story – not just the one expressed by a few hoarder tenants.

Planetizen: In Spite of Affordability Crisis, Richmond Rejects Manufactured Housing Plan

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A proposed manufactured housing project was denied a permit in Richmond, Virginia, despite a growing housing crisis in that city, one so severe it was officially recognized by the city council just two weeks prior to the project’s rejection. 

As Wyatt Gordon explains in Greater Greater Washington, “Beyond the details of the drama between 9th District Councilmember Mike Jones — a rising star in the commonwealth’s Democratic Party — and one of Richmond’s premier housing nonprofits, the impasse boiled down to whether a warehouse should be sited next to single-family housing. The lot Project:HOMES hoped to turn into a production facility for...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, who wouldn’t want to have a mobile home manufacturing plant built next to their single-family home on land zoned residential? Who could possibly be mad at having their property value fall by 50%+, have constant noise, and have zero liquidity on re-sale? I guarantee that if the mayor was that property owner this would never have made it to a vote.

The Daily Record: Wooster council approves 'broad' regulations for manufactured homes citing health, safety

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WOOSTER ― The city now has the authority to enforce maintenance code violations on manufactured homes following a 6-1 Wooster City Council vote Monday.

This vote came after a back-and-forth discussion about how the city authority will be applied without stepping on the toes of federal and state agencies, each of which regulate specific aspects of manufactured homes.

Changes:Wooster council OKs expansion of manufactured homes in existing mobile home parks

The legislation applies as many housing regulations to the prefabricated dwellings as possible, said John Scavelli, city law director.

The goal, he said, is to see how a city can best...

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Our thoughts on this story:

At least one bureaucrat got it right : “only Councilman Scott Myers voted no, citing the broad nature of the provisions and the potential of government overreach”. Once again the city is passing a law that they acknowledge does not align with state law, and will then be tossed out in litigation. Does this seem like a trend to you?

Michigan Radio: Under hedge fund ownership, Michigan mobile home parks' rents spike while maintenance lags

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Sudden rent increases. Maintenance jobs ignored. And eviction notices that catch tenants by surprise.

People living in mobile home parks across Michigan say those issues have become commonplace since a secretive hedge fund bought up their parks.

Rose White is a reporter with MLive who's been investigating the tenants concerns. She spoke with Michigan Radio Morning Edition host Doug Tribou.

Doug Tribou: You spoke to a lot of residents of these mobile home parks. What are some of their main complaints?

Rose White: One of the main ones is big rent increases. Some of them are seeing their rents go up $130 at a time. And a lot of homeowners...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This woke journalist contends that private equity groups buying mobile home parks are “vulture capitalists” ... “an investor who buys up distressed companies and makes a profit by aggressively cutting costs or selling the business for parts”. Let’s try and put some common sense to this statement:

  1. Yes, private equity groups raise rents because they’re ridiculously low and not supported by market forces. If the apartments are $1,200 per month, then lot rents don’t need to be $350 per month but rather $1,000+ per month to align with supply and demand. These groups are being nice simply raising rents in more moderate amounts, even when it’s 100% legal to go up in larger increments.
  2. No, private equities make zero money cutting costs. What’s there to cut? Can’t shut off utilities, stop paying property taxes or drop the insurance. Can the writer please elaborate and give a single example?
  3. How do you sell a mobile home park for parts? Sell off the power poles to a logging company? Again, this is a stupid comment that is not based on fact and the writer gives no examples at all.

Did you notice this week that there’s a plethora of similar articles about “evil private equity groups”. I’ve seen this before. A few years ago a single associate professor in Colorado bragged that they had been able to cause 40 different media groups to publish their personal grudge that mobile home park owners are evil. Lurking in the background is some new person or group that is trying to do the same.

ABC6: Neighbors band together to fight repeated rent hikes in their community

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LANCASTER, Ohio (WSYX) — Tenants of a mobile home park in Lancaster are protesting what they call repeated rent hikes in their community. Thursday afternoon, they held signs outside of Colonial Estates Mobile Home Park's main office calling for rent control and pleading not to force seniors out.

Twelve-year residents Dan Wynkle and his wife started a tenants' organization that they registered with the state to fight another $30 lot rent increase. He said housing costs eat up more that the $2,100 they bring in per month.

According to the Fairfield County auditor's website, an out-of-state investor from California bought the trailer park in...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There is no rent control in Ohio and this story is based on the false narrative that somehow a few mobile home park tenants can magically change state law. And if that happened, parks like this one would simply be torn down and made into more profitable uses. However, there is definitely a problem when senior residents can’t afford to allocate more money for lot rent, which is always going up (along with every other thing in America today). So the real issue is how you subsidize the seniors if that’s what society wants to do. If the city/county/state wants to start paying a portion of the lot rent to the property owner, then I’m sure they’d be fine with that. But we all know that’s not going to happen and what’s really going on is that society is trying to make mobile home park owners subsidize tenants and effectively become their own personal Section 8. That’s all these stories basically amount to. And it’s extremely annoying that mobile home park owners should be placed in that position when apartment owners simply receive subsidies through Section 8. If the government doesn’t want to do its job with subsidies, then that should be the end of it. Either put up or shut up. 

Insider: A buyer shelled out $145,000 for a retro mobile home in California with rumored ties to 'I Love Lucy' — see inside

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"Lucy, I'm home!"

A mobile home in Palm Springs, California, that is now a delightful one-bedroom home, but is rumored to have been Desi Arnaz's makeup trailer for "I Love Lucy," sold in May for $145,000.

The petite closing price actually works out to quite a large price per square foot — especially considering it's just the trailer its new owner purchased and not the land underneath it.

In Palm Springs — home of natural hot springs and celebrity getaways — the median listing home price per square foot is $501. That's more than double the national average of $222, according to Realtor.com.

But in Horizon Mobile Village & RV Park at the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The person who did this remodel actually did a pretty good job. But anyone who would pay $145,000 for a tiny RV that formerly served as Desi Arnaz’ makeup trailer is nuts. If you’re looking for a cool home in California, you could have taken that $145,000 and bought a 100’ wooden yacht that the engines are missing on and moor it in a nice harbor or marina and wear a yachting hat and ascot. I know someone who did that – in Catalina harbor no less – and that’s way smarter than this trailer concept.

Carteret County News Times: Peletier schedules public hearings on rezoning requests for park model homes, tiny houses

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PELETIER — Park model homes, and to a lesser degree, tiny homes, are catching on fast in western Carteret County, with major projects in planning stages.

Monday night, Peletier commissioners scheduled public hearings next month on two smaller ones.

The board met in the town hall off Highway 58.

Jonathan Wrightson, who owns property along Bucks Corner Road, which runs between Highway 58 and Whitehouse Fork Road, has submitted rezoning requests for five separate lots along the street.

He wants to rezone 187, 191 and 199 Bucks Corner Road from B-1 (business) and rezone 175 and 169 Bucks Corner from residential to mobile campers.

All of the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There’s clearly a disconnect here. The mobile home park owner says he wants to bring in tiny homes to replace run-down trailers, and the city says it’s going to start sending out citations and fines for run-down trailers. I see absolutely nothing in this article even remotely suggesting that the city is actually going to give this guy a variance to bring in tiny homes on HUD-licensed lots. All that’s going on, in my opinion, is the city is declaring war on the old trailers and after they get them removed is going to deny the tiny home dream and, as a result, reduce the occupancy at the park.

The Daily World: Aberdeen considering rent notice rule for mobile home parks

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As residents of a mobile home park in South Aberdeen continue to push for regulation of rising rents, the Aberdeen City Council last week considered an ordinance that would extend the notification period for rent increases.

As it reads now, though, the ordinance — which would require a six-month advance notification for rent increases greater than 5% in mobile home parks — could be dipping into areas of landlord and tenant protections already regulated by the state, potentially setting the city up for litigation, according to the city’s legal counsel.

That prospect caused the city council to table the ordinance in search of a more solid...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This story is so ridiculous. Let’s break it down into each dumb piece:

  1. The tenants say that $635 per month for lot rent is ridiculously high. I’m sorry but a quick search on Bestplaces.net shows the median home price to be over $300,000. STUPID.
  2. The city of Aberdeen wants to increase the notice period for rent increases to 180 days, in complete contradiction to state law and certain to be overturned in court without ever taking effect. STUPID.

So what’s really going on here? A few of the tenants obviously are going down and yelling at city officials who want them to get out of their hair so they are proposing a law that they know has no chance of sticking just so those few tenants will stop coming to their offices and wasting their time. Classic move.
I think I’ve seen this movie before – wasn’t it called Joe Biden and the evictions moratorium that the Supreme Court threw out the window but placated AOC and “the squad” for a brief while?

Arizona's Family: Residents of Mesa mobile home park asked to leave within several months

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MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- Residents at Primrose Estates in Mesa were given notices this week saying the land the mobile home park is on could be used for something else in the future. The notice states that people have 180 days to find another place to live. However, the letter didn’t give an exact date on when people needed to be moved out by. “There’s people in here with no place to go, older people, and handicapped people,” Ron Hennemann said. “I’ll land on my feet. I always do, but I’m worried about them.”

Hennemann has lived in Primrose Estates for over ten years but says they’ve had major septic issues for the past three years....

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Our thoughts on this story:

Now Primrose Estates of Mesa, Arizona joins the growing list of parks being torn down to make way for more profitable uses. How could this have been avoided. HIGHER LOT RENTS. This is not rocket science.

Iowa Capital Dispatch: How Minnesota will spend $1 billion on housing

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Minnesota lawmakers increased the state’s spending on housing about ninefold over the next two years, mostly with one-time funding paid for with part of the $17.5 billion surplus.

The $1 billion in new funding (HF2335) will help developers build more affordable apartments, help low- and moderate-income Minnesotans buy their first homes, and provide rental assistance to thousands of households.

Lawmakers also created the first dedicated funding source for housing through a new quarter-cent sales tax in the seven-county Twin Cities metropolitan area. That tax is estimated to raise about $300 million over the next two years, with the...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Spending money putting more people on the dole is not going to do anything but delay the inevitable until those funds run out. Apartment Section 8 programs are not sustainable and never were. If you really want to solve affordable housing the key is to come up with a single-family home that can be built incredibly cheaply (think 3-D printing) and then the state/county/city provides the land and infrastructure for free. It’s a one-time cost and the tenant can last forever with a debt-free cheap house that requires no further subsidy. Why is this not already occurring? Because the single-family and multi-family housing lobbies will never let it happen and they have every bureaucrat in the nation on their payroll in some manner.

Cape Gazette: Construction underway in Donovan Smith Manufactured Home Park

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Following less-than-ideal construction conditions to start the week of May 30, work to provide some Lewes residents with sanitary services has begun.

Teal Construction has started assembling sanitary pipes in a staging area for the Delaware Clean Water Initiative’s pilot program, the Donovan Smith Manufactured Home Park Sewer and Water Extension Project. The Dover-based company started the piping connections June 1.

George, Miles and Buhr engineer Duane Hoffman, GMB’s project representative, said crews will assemble the piping in the staging area prior to delivering it to Donovans Road to minimize unnecessary lane closures. Hoffman said...

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Our thoughts on this story:

There’s little description of what the “Dover” program is, but if it replaces aging sewer lines in parks at no cost to the owner then I’m all for it. These are the types of initiatives that would save many mom & pop parks from the wrecking ball.

Longmont Leader: Former mobile home park will one day be affordable housing

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The Longmont housing department plans later this month to use American Rescue Plan Act funds to eventually turn the former Royal Mobile Home Park into affordable housing.

The property at 133 S. Coffman St. is currently owned by Longmont Public Works. In this proposed deal, the city’s Housing and Community Investment department plans to use ARPA funds to purchase the property for $2.1 million by the end of this month.

According to a city memo, the September 2013 flood caused severe destruction to the 56 mobile homes at the former Royal Mobile Home Park on the north bank of St. Vrain Creek, just west of Main Street.

Using disaster...

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Our thoughts on this story:

You’ve got to love these bureaucrats. They are tearing down a mobile home park and turning it into apartments and then disguising this as being OK because the apartments will be “affordable”. Of course, the apartments will only be “affordable” with government subsidies like Section 8. And they were able to escape the wrath of the media by saying “there’s really no difference between non-subsidized mobile home parks and subsidized apartments – it’s all just one big affordable housing family” which is clearly not true. 

The Islander: Mum is the word on pending Pines trailer park sale

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Despite news of a pending sale for the Pines Trailer Park at the bay end of Bridge Street in Bradenton Beach, residents and parties privy to the sale have little to say.

Homeowners in the mobile home park, 103 Church Ave., received notice May 8 of an offer from an unknown entity to purchase the park land.

The notice, prepared by attorney David A. Luczak, representing the Pines owners — the Jackson Partnership — said the partnership was considering the offer of $16,250,000 for all park-owned land, mobile homes, recreational vehicles, equipment, materials, vehicles and buildings.

The offer included an initial nonrefundable deposit of $1...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Yes, I believe this is the same park that the tenants had first option to buy for $16,250,000 with $1 million non-refundable and they were only able to raise only around $4,000 by the date to exercise their option. Now these same tenants are miffed that the owner is not giving them updates on the REAL buyer and the date of closing. Why should they? The tenants had their shot and blew it. Why would anyone think the seller owes them any further courtesies which, no doubt, they will only use to try and derail the legitimate and lawful sale further? 

Newswires: Despite DOE Delay Manufactured Housing Energy Standards Remain Unacceptable as Costs Continue to Increase, per MHARR

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Manufactured Housing Association Updates MHI-TMHA v DOE Case # 1:23-cv-00174 in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas.

 
By mandating IECC as the base energy code for manufactured housing, section 413 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) would fundamentally undermine the manufactured housing market”
— Mark Weiss, J.D., President and CEO of MHARR.

WASHINGTON, D.C., UNITED STATES, May 25, 2023/EINPresswire.com/ -- In a statement to manufactured home industry professionals, affordable housing advocates, public officials, and others following the affordable housing crisis, the Manufactured...

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Our thoughts on this story:

If you haven’t been following this story, the U.S. Government is trying to cram down crazy environmentalist rules on mobile home manufacturing that will make the cost of mobile homes go up and the energy savings to customers go down an incredibly tiny percent that in no way justifies that extra home cost. We all know that the mobile home manufacturers will lose this battle (as all industries have in the Biden era) and then the rules will be reversed by the next administration before they even come into effect. So it’s just hard to get too worked up over it. 

My Record Journal: Housing advocates say Connecticut is lagging in small home development

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MERIDEN — As Carabetta Companies wind down conversion of an obsolete trailer park into a small home development on Broad Street, housing advocates say the state lags behind others in this type of development. 

Realtor Alexa Kebalo Hughes of the Connecticut Realtors Association lives in a small cabin in Colebrook. The property has several small cabins on 350 acres. Kebalo Hughes said she doesn’t expect the attraction to tiny homes to slow down anytime soon.

“There’s a massive trend towards smaller homes and storage unit conversions for both residential and commercial throughout the nation,” Kebalo Hughes said. 

“The best approach to solve...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Connect the dots from the articles so far – this is the second one in which a mobile home park is being demolished and replaced with an equal number of tiny stick-built homes. If that concept heats up, then you will see a lot more parks be bulldozed as this is a win/win for all involved. I looked at doing this myself to my park in Grapevine, Texas 25 years ago, but sold the park instead. As the demand for smaller, affordable stick-built homes heats up, this is a quick development fix as all the utilities are already there and all you have to do is start pouring foundations and getting the mobile homes out. The big problem is that you can only rent – rather than sell – these stick-built homes, so the “parking lot” business model is out the door. However, some cities have allowed the park to be re-platted into individual lots and they then can be sold off.

I thought it was interesting how the developer has coined a new name for this type of development, calling it “innovate housing” and eliminating any reference to tiny homes. Nobody wants to be reminded that they live in a tiny home – it’s kind of insulting.

12 News: Residents of GCU-owned mobile home park remain without a new home a day after move out deadline

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PHOENIX — A day after Periwinkle Mobile Home Park was set to close, some families remained without a place to go.

On Monday 12News spoke to some residents who have lived near 27th Avenue and Camelback Road for years, but after May 28, which was the move-out date, have yet to stabilize a new home.

Grand Canyon University purchased the land in 2016 and decided on a land change to develop new student housing, which meant all 46 households on the property were forced to relocate.

As of last Tuesday, 11 families remained at the property. No updated tally on the number of families still at the mobile home park was available on Monday.

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Our thoughts on this story:

Grand Canyon University apparently has little real-life experience with mobile home park residents. They allocated $500,000 to removing the roughly 60 households in the mobile home park they are demolishing yet are getting nothing but grief from the residents who refuse to take any action to help themselves in relocation. GCU spokesperson Bob Romantic (what a name) said “if there is someone saying they have no place to go … we can’t help unless they are willing to be helped”. Some residents, of course, are threatening pointless litigation and others refuse to answer their door or phone. If GCU offered every resident $1 million to move, they’d probably refuse and say it’s not enough. It’s hard to have compassion for people who will not lift a finger to help themselves, and instead want to wallow in self-pity and take the position that they are victims and deserve more. The media is somewhat to blame as they empowered these people to think they have more power than they do. As they will find out soon, they have none and should have worked with GCU when they had the chance.

3TV/CBS 5: Yavapai College combatting housing crisis with RV park, tiny homes

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If you build it, they will come. That’s the thinking behind the Yavapai College district’s creative idea to attract more employees and students. “Something like this can make a huge difference,” said Dr. Clint Ewell, the VP of Finance and Administration.

The college will be offering tiny homes and an RV park at some of its campuses where an affordable housing shortage is felt. “We’ve noticed that our recruiting pools have been getting smaller, and we believe it’s because of the high cost of living here in Yavapai County. We’re currently at about 20% above the national average,” said Dr. Ewell.

The college is hopeful a 200 sq. ft. houses...

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Our thoughts on this story:

This is actually not a bad idea. The U.S. government built mobile home parks (then RV parks by definition) at colleges across America to house the G.I. Bill folks. But then the article says the college plan is to build only three tiny homes a year. That’s a pretty small number – hardly worth the article to begin with.

The Aspen Times: El Jebel land among U.S. Forest Service sites eyed for potential workforce housing

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As lawmakers address housing shortages in the West, U.S. Forest Service properties are being eyed for their potential to provide residences for local workforces, including in El Jebel.

Signed into law in December 2018, the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 — otherwise known as the Farm Bill — gave USFS the authority to lease its administrative sites for affordable housing. But the act has yet to result in the construction of affordable housing on those sites, and that’s in part “due to their lease terms,” said U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, “which are not long enough to provide certainty to local communities.”

A new bill being introduced by...

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Our thoughts on this story:

In a Colorado world in which bureaucrats are worried about “the ecological impact on a variety of riparian species” it’s easy to see why not a single one of these projects has been approved since 2018. I’m betting that it will be 2118 before all parties can agree to a plan that has no “riparian” impact. Until then this concept will be used for endless virtue signaling that they care deeply about affordable housing but that newts and darter snails take higher priority.

WFLA: Surviving the storm: How safe is your mobile home?

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IONA, Fla. (WFLA) —People who live in mobile homes, especially older ones, and choose to remain at home when a major storm threatens are at a much greater risk for damage and personal injury.

Bonzy Galor chose to ride out Hurricane Ian, with its 150 mile per hour winds, and 10-to-15-foot storm surge, in her mobile home. “We could not move,” she recalls, “all the totes started floating, everything was under water.” Wind and water tore their home apart.

The insurance institute of business and home safety tests mobile homes, and concludes new building techniques to make buildings safer, but how new? “IBHS tests prove newer manufactured...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’m sorry but there’s no form of real estate that can survive 150 mph winds – which is the benchmark in this article. Mobile homes do just about as well as most things, but a windowless concrete bunker is the only way you’re going to survive a 150 mph sustained wind without ending up being thrown a couple miles.

Star Tribune: Residents at Lake Elmo mobile home park say owner has forgotten them

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Faced with what they describe as steep rent increases, a drop in services and poor management, the residents of a Lake Elmo mobile home park say it's too much: They want help.

The renters and homeowners in the 450-site Cimarron Park and Golf Course have formed a Resident's Association and teamed up with an attorney from the nonprofit Housing Justice Center to explore legal options in the face of worsening conditions, said resident Brey Mafi.

"When I moved in, I quickly realized I got sold a bill of goods," Mafi said, echoing other residents who say the owner, Chicago-based Equity Lifestyle Properties, has squeezed the park's operations...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Look, I understand that the residents don’t like the rent going from around $700 per month to $900 per month over a five-year period (which is actually only about the rate of inflation) but NOBODY IS GOING TO BELIEVE THAT EQUITY LIFESTYLE IS NOT PROPERLY MAINTAINING THE PROPERTY. ELS is one of the best operators in the industry – and the largest owner – and they are known for exemplary property condition. I’m willing to bet $100 that if I flew out to that property right now it would be immaculate and everything the residents claim is completely false. This would be like a Kansas City Chiefs fan claiming that ticket prices have doubled (which is true) and the Chiefs are a lousy team that don’t deserve those higher ticket prices (clearly not true). Why can’t these people just be honest and say “I’m mad because my rent went up $40 a year for the past five years”? And then, if they are that mad, just move someplace cheaper and stop whining about it? As soon as the people named in this article get both sides of the story (and visit the property) they will know who’s telling the truth (ELS) and who is not (the residents).

Health Affairs: The Environmental Justice Challenge No One Is Talking About

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The past few years have witnessed a societal reckoning with income, class, and racial disparities, particularly as they relate to health and well-being. A number of multisector collaborations with a focus on environmental justice and social determinants of health have sprouted up and are leveraging advocacy, philanthropy, and governmental policy to address these intersectional issues. While these efforts are far-reaching in their pursuit of addressing historical inequity, one particularly vulnerable group has been overlooked—residents of manufactured home communities (MHCs).

Colloquially known as mobile home parks or trailer parks, MHCs...

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Our thoughts on this story:

I’m hoping that this was written by AI as it contains more inaccuracies than a mere mortal could assemble. Here are just a sampling of the facts that are incorrect:

  • Berkshire Hathaway does not own any mobile home parks – they only own manufacturing and financing.
  • There are not 22 million Americans living in mobile home parks. With only 44,000 mobile home parks in the U.S. that would be an average of 500 lots per park. The actual stat is around 22 million people living in mobile homes which includes those living in parks and (as an even larger group) those who live in mobile homes on their own land.
  • The majority of mobile home parks are not built on floodplain – those that are represent a minority.
  • And on, and on, and on

Then, after all this incorrect nonsense that is portrayed as fact, the purpose of the article is apparently to complain that mobile home parks are environmentally goofy … and you just lose interest and go to the next article. It’s kind of like a movie that is advertised as an action flick but turns out to be a documentary on AOC. 

Kitsap Sun: Assistance pledged to Poulsbo Mobile Home Park repairs now dedicated to rent relief

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North Kitsap Fishline plans to refocus $30,000 initially intended for property improvements at Poulsbo Mobile Home Park toward rent relief for individual households.

Just more than a week after a community meeting that was set up to discuss the distribution of funds for home repairs and ease fears of eviction for residents at the park, North Kitsap Fishline announced the assistance will be used to reduce July rent payments.

The May 18 meeting, which followed a Poulsbo City Council vote to allocate $15,000 in city funds to help residents with physical repairs, revealed not all park residents had received inspection reports from park...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Spending $500 per household is hardly worthy of this much fanfare – most mobile home park buyers spend far more than this on home renovations and clean-up. Only most park owners never get credit for it.

Visual Capitalist: Modular Housing vs. Traditional Housing: How Do They Compare?

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Modular Housing vs. Traditional Housing: How Do They Compare?

The U.S. needs new houses. Lots of them. 

With housing prices nearing six times annual incomes, increasing supply is a must if there is any hope of bringing down house prices, and modular housing could be the solution.

This visualization is the third and final piece of the Reimagining Home Series from our sponsor Boxabl, where we compare the benefits of modular housing against traditional construction methods. Let’s start with the basics.

What Is Modular Housing?

Modular homes are built offsite, in standardized sections, usually in a factory setting. They are then transported...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The big problem with modular homes is found right in the article: they only cost 25% less than traditional stick-built homes.That’s just not a big enough discount to outweigh the stigma. I think you’d have to be at around 50% off to make the average American consider it.