Mobile Home Park News Briefing

Mobile Home Park Investing Audios | Mobile Home Park Investing Videos | Mobile Home Park Mastery Podcast



The Press Democrat: Sonoma County Home and Garden Show presents good designs in a small package

Preview:

indsay and Eric Wood bought and flipped a few houses in their day. Still, they didn’t have a home of their own. But in 2017, after years of being subject to the rising whims of the rental market in Marin County, they said, “enough.”

The pair decided their best path to homeownership was to shrink their footprint and go tiny.

They found a contractor to build them a tiny home, a compact and efficiently designed residence on wheels that would have all the comforts they needed but not a square inch of wasted space.

“We had spent a total of $100,000 in rent in seven years. That pretty much could have paid for a tiny home,” Lindsay said.

Lindsay...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

A 380 square foot house for $125,000 is something that would only work in California. And that does not even include the land. As a Midwesterner, this blows my mind.

CBS 6 News Richmond WTVR: Thousands approved to help 'worst living conditions' in Richmond. Why hasn't it been spent?

Preview:

RICHMOND, Va. -- Catarino Salvez Galvez and his family have lived in a mobile home park on Richmond's Southside for six years.

The home he owns currently is falling apart.

The floor has sunken in, the roof caved, and it has cracked in multiple places.

The windows do not close, keeping it cold during the winter and swelteringly hot during the summer months.

His 11-year-old daughter has been sick because of the conditions, he said.

"I don't feel good sharing it, I don't want to share the conditions I'm living in," Galvez said.

It's a reality for many of his neighbors who own trailers in his neighborhood but cannot afford to fix them.

"It's...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

It’s a consistent theme of bureaucrats in the U.S. to offer great-sounding programs that never actually get funded (particularly when they need attention before an election). While we applaud the concept of giving $8,000 to individual mobile home owners to make necessary repairs – and then having them pay it back in regular monthly installments – talking about it doesn’t do any good. It’s a shame that park owners are not held to the same standard, promising to pay their property taxes and then, if they don’t, having no consequences or accountability.

Bradenton Herald: One of Anna Maria Island’s last trailer parks is for sale in Florida. ‘It’s a family.’

Preview:

Along with the bright colors, quirky personal touches and flowering plants at the Pines Trailer Park, there is sadness and uncertainty among residents.

Park owner Jackson Partnership LLLP plans to sell the park and offered the home owners association the first chance to buy it, as it is required to do under state statute.

The asking price for the 87-lot, 2.78-acre park at 103 Church Avenue: $16 million.

Residents own their homes but rent the land under their trailers.

Dating back to 1935, the park was first used by members of a traveling circus, some say, and baseball great Babe Ruth once owned a home at 402 Church Ave., that later burned...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

“The asking price for the 87-lot, 2.78-acre park at 103 Church Avenue: $16 million”. I know that the fact that Babe Ruth lived in this park in the 1930s is cool, but let’s face some reality here. First of all, that’s a density of 29 units per acre, which is insanely tight (the lots are crazy small, as are the trailers). And that price works out to $183,908 per lot. Wouldn’t the residents be miles ahead if you just gave them that money and they could move into a nice brick house?

Phoenix New Times: Mobile Home Park Residents Plead for Phoenix to Stop Evictions

Preview:

The city of Phoenix is considering several ways to halt evictions that are displacing mobile home park residents across the Valley.

At an emotional meeting of the City Council's Community and Cultural Investment Subcommittee on Monday, councilmembers heard from residents at three different Phoenix trailer parks that are facing evictions in the coming weeks. In more than an hour and a half of testimony, residents and supporters pleaded with the elected officials to take action to stop the evictions.

Councilmembers Betty Guardado, Carlos Garcia, and Yassamin Ansari voted to bring several policy suggestions to the full city council, including...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Here’s what the writer of this article is promoting:

“The councilmembers also recommended that the city partner with a nonprofit to study the city's mobile home parks. The city would then use the study to create a special zoning overlay, which would prevent property owners from redeveloping mobile home parks and changing the land use without city approval.”

This would effectively qualify as a “public taking” of these parks and there is a methodology to that which would require the city to pay the park owners what they could get for the land for redevelopment. But, of course, the city does not want to pay anything for this ability to “take” these properties so they want to put an overlay on them to reduce their value without paying the difference.

If the city council passes this, I would hope that the park owner sues each and every council member personally for illegally taking away their property rights. That will get their attention and perhaps end their pandering to this nonsense. I saw this same thing happen in the 1980s when a landowner tried to tear down a grocery store to build a movie theater. The neighbors didn’t want to lose the grocery store, so they convinced the Dallas city council to vote to refuse to allow the developer to build the theater, even though it meant all their guidelines. The property owner filed suit personally on each member of the city council the following morning and the council mysteriously voted to undo their ruling within a couple days.

New Hampshire Public Radio: In some NH communities, housing is on the ballot this local election season

Preview:

Julia Neily has lived in Lebanon for the last 25 years. Recently, she tried to find a one-bedroom rental in the Upper Valley for her mom — who lives in Massachusetts — so that they could live closer to each other. But it wasn’t easy.

“Oh, my gosh, horrible,” she said. Listings were going so fast that she barely had time to send in an application. “As soon as you find a place, it was gone in a day.”

Julia Neily stands on a sidewalk and smiles at the camera
Jeongyoon Han
/
NHPR
Julia Neily has lived in Lebanon for the last 25 years. Her sister who also lives there. Neily tried looking for a rental in the Upper Valley for their mother — but after a drawn-out search yielded few options, she...
Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Only a handful of towns in New Hampshire’s Upper Valley are taking up zoning changes this town meeting season. But farther south, in New London, town officials are also pushing for changes in an effort to address the housing shortage.

“I think we’re feeling the same pressures as the rest of the state in the housing market,” New London Zoning Administrator Adam Ricker said. “We’ve been hearing from our major institutions that they’re having a hard time recruiting because people can’t find housing — not just in New London, but anywhere in a reasonable commuting distance that’s affordable for the positions that they’re recruiting for.”

Recent census data shows that single family units make up the vast majority of New London’s housing. This spring, the town’s planners are hoping voters will be open to incentivizing different types of housing developments. That would include multi-family homes, condos, and workforce units. Another proposal would grant density bonuses — financial incentives to build units in a specified development project — in certain parts of town where planners think more housing would work well.

Paradis, who leads the town’s planning board, said that kind of mixed housing stock is exactly what the town needs: Right now, New London officials say out of the more than 2000 units in town, only 7 are available.
Building a variety of housing, Paradis said, would allow many different people to make New London a home.

“I don't think you're going to see a wholesale change,” he said. “We would just have different types of housing beyond just single family housing in certain areas where it makes sense.”

Ricker said it’s hard to tell how the proposals will go over when voters finally weigh in.

“I think that whatever the will of the voters ends up being, it will provide the planning board data,” he said. “Then, they can readjust and decide what their path forward will be.”

The Union Democrat: 'Like a war zone': Jamestown mobile home park devastated by tornado-producing storm

Preview:

Residents of Woods Creek Mobile Home Park and RV Resort between Sonora and Jamestown were cleaning up Monday from the path of destruction left by a severe weekend storm that produced a rare confirmed tornado which touched down Saturday afternoon in the Jamestown area.

Rhonda and Don Casner, residents of the creekside-hillside community for more than five years, said the storm on Saturday brought extreme, sideways, circular winds, uprooted trees and flying tree limbs, rains pouring through broken windows and damaged roofs, and flood waters from rising Woods Creek that severely damaged or destroyed the two homes closest to theirs, set one...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Only 5 out of 91 mobile homes were severely damaged in a tornado hit directly on the park? Pretty impressive. Mobile homes are a lot tougher than people give them credit for. Of course, the modern tie-down is a big part of the story, as a mobile home that breaks loose from the ground becomes effectively a giant, flying wrecking ball.

The Durango Herald: Under new control, water on the way for mobile home park west of Durango

Preview:

Nearly a month has passed since the water stopped running at Lightner Creek Mobile Home Park on Feb. 13. With each passing week, the situation has continued to devolve as the park’s owner, Darlene Mann, finds herself facing mounting legal trouble.

But as of Friday evening, Mann is no longer in control. She signed an agreement leasing the property on a month-to-month basis to Chris Hamilton, a Durango attorney who has been under contract to buy the park for over a year and a half. Hamilton will take control of the park effective April 1.

Although Mann has been pressured by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment for years...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Great quote from the new owner who is trying to bring this old park back to life:

“Darlene claims, and may be right, that she doesn't have the money to save the park, to fix the water,” Hamilton said. “If the water doesn't get fixed, the park will implode and have to close down and that will be the end of it for everybody there. They don't deserve that, they're innocent people. And no one else is going to do it.”

This is one of those rare articles that is actually fair and balanced.

The Bourne Enterprise: Shockwaves Felt By Residents Following Pocasset Mobile Home Park Ruling

Preview:

Shock and disbelief.

Those are the words used by The Park at Pocasset residents Albert MacDonald, Jim McSharry, and Bill Lytle to describe their feelings when the Barnstable Superior Court handed down its ruling in a case surrounding the sale of the park three months ago.

All three men are members of the park’s resident association, which has been enveloped in a three-year-long legal battle over the park’s sale. Mr. MacDonald, a resident for more than eight years, could not believe what he read until he saw it in print: the court had ruled against the Pocasset Park Association, the residents group intent on purchasing the community,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

A judge shoots down each and every claim from a group of disgruntled residents and decides that the tenants failed in their quest to buy the park under their first option, having failed to get the necessary resident signatures to start the process by around 30%. The crazy part is that the residents were able to keep this case in court for years when the whole case was so stupid. Shame on this judge who wasted so much time and legal fees on points of law that any sane adult could have ruled on within an hour.

Houston Chronicle: Houston developer unveils $34M luxury mobile home community with 420 lots for sale

Preview:

Houston-based Live Lone Star Communities unveiled the first of several manufactured home communities planned across Texas as it aims to provide affordable homes in a setting that incorporates elements found in upscale master-planned communities.

The developer on Tuesday provided a preview at The Landing at Pearland, a gated 55-acre community at 17730 County Road 127, near Pearland Regional Airport. The $34 million project includes plans for 420 home sites and is expected to open in April.

“The goal is to bring quality manufactured homes with amenities to markets where houses are so expensive that it’s keeping people from owning in those...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

“The homes range from two to five bedrooms, contain 850 to 2,200 square feet, and sell from about $80,000 to $170,000, according to Live Lone Star. Residents pay monthly fees of about $675, which cover lot rental, use of the amenities and common-area maintenance.” If you add in the lot rent, that’s the same as a mortgage on a $180,000 to $270,000 stick-built home. You can buy a really nice single-family home in Missouri for that much money.

The Sun: Owners of Fresno’s troubled mobile home parks invented a spokesman named after a sex joke

Preview:

Harmony Communities, the property management company that purchased a troubled Fresno mobile home park, appears to have used a prank name as it worked on its PR issues. 

The Stockton-based company interfaced with Fresno-based media under the pseudonym “Heywood Jablóm,” presented as the director of communication and marketing, but a report from The Business Journal revealed that he does not exist and that the name is merely a play on a play-on-words sex joke.

The backstory: Harmony Communities stepped in as the buyer of the troubled Trails End Mobile Home Park in north Fresno last year for $1.7 million. 

  • But the company faced stiff...
Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The first funny mobile home park story of 2023. Why not make a joke of how unfair the media portrays mobile home park owners by inventing a fake official spokesperson and spoofing reporters who are too stupid to figure it out?

The Press Democrat: Santa Rosa mobile home park residents won’t let city forget its unfinished rent control law

Preview:

At Thursday’s marathon session to set Santa Rosa City Council's policy priorities for the year, several residents showed up to remind officials the recent rent control law governing mobile home parks remains unfinished.

“We have a real mess,” mobile home owner and longtime advocate Roger McConnell said during public comment. ”This has gone on and on...We need help. We need to get this done. Please.”

On Dec. 6, the council updated a decades-old law restricting how much mobile home park owners can raise rent each year on the land under residents’ homes.

Previously, Santa Rosa’s mobile home rent control, governed by different laws than other...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

WARNING: READ THIS ARTICLE BEFORE YOU BUY A PARK IN CALIFORNIA. No wonder everyone is fleeing the state.

Realtor: 7 Magnificent Mobile Homes That Defy the Tired ‘Trailer Park’ Reputation

Preview:

Mobile homes have come a long way. Despite their reputation as a last resort for desperate homebuyers who can’t afford a “traditional” home, these prefabricated structures are not all depressing metal boxes. They can be stylish, well designed, and extremely affordable options for a buyer looking to either downsize or get a foot in the housing market.

Today, mobile homes have interiors that are sometimes truly extraordinary. If you don’t believe us, check out this mobile home in the Hamptons that was recently sold for a record price of $3.75 million.

Spurred by that big buy, we perused listings nationwide to find seven stylish mobile homes...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

When you pay $1,000 to $3,000 per square foot for a mobile home, you have to be basically nuts. A nice stick-built home can be had for less than half that amount – and comes with the land underneath. Overpaying for an asset is nothing to be proud of, but it is fun to see just how stupid people can be.

Wiscasset Newspaper: Wiscasset mobile home park resolves water issue

Preview:

Water that, for weeks, was sometimes off, is back on and, knock on wood, will stay on, a lawyer representing Whippoorwill Mobile Home Park’s management firm, Maine Real Estate Management (MREM), said. According to attorney Michael Harman of Bloomer Russell Beaupain in Bangor, pumps at the fully occupied, 31-unit park on Route 27 in Wiscasset repeatedly kicked off due to a shortage of water and had to be manually restarted. 

Whippoorwill retained Maine Rural Water to do sonogram studies, as a leak was suspected, Harman explained in phone interviews and in letters March 2 and 7 to Maine Department of Professional and Financial Regulation...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The government department for park owners in Maine is the “Maine Department of Professional and Financial Regulation Office of Professional and Occupational Regulation Manufactured Housing Board”? That’s funnier than the fake spokesperson article above. I’d like to see that letterhead.

KATV: Tenants of Benton mobile home park worry about future after given 30 days to vacate land

Preview:

BENTON, Ark. (KATV) — The sun isn't really shining at the Sunset Lake Mobile Home Park in Benton after the landlord terminated their leases.

From continuous issues on the property like a lack of water to now being forced from their homes.

"We've went weeks at a time without water and we get threatened that the water will be off longer if we say anything," said tenant Jennifer Aloway.

Close to 100 tenants receiving a notice that said the landlord is terminating their lease in 30 days.

"We don't know what we're going to do," said Aloway. "It's very expensive to move a trailer. It's expensive. A lot of places aren't even allowing...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

First the resident harass the owner over the water system, and then are horrified when he decides to simply shut the park down and redevelop it into something else. Has anyone ever heard the old adage “biting the hand that feeds you”?

The White House: FACT SHEET: President Biden’s Budget Lowers Housing Costs and Expands Access to Affordable Rent and Home Ownership

Preview:

President Biden believes that everyone deserves to live in a safe and affordable home. Whether you rent or own, having a place to live that you can afford in a neighborhood with opportunities is the foundation for so much else in life.

It’s also the foundation for so much else in our economy. A lack of quality affordable housing hinders the job market and holds back economic growth by making it harder for workers to access good-paying jobs. It drives up costs for families and inflationary pressures. It also increases commutes and inefficient energy consumption, which exacerbates climate change. And a lack of affordable housing...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Since the Democrats no longer have control of Congress, the odds of the Biden budget ever actually going anywhere is probably lower than the Chicago Bears winning the Superbowl in 2023. Actually, the Bears probably have a better shot.

azcentral: Phoenix cannot stand by while mobile home parks are razed

Preview:

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego and our colleagues on the Phoenix City Council have an opportunity to join our efforts to keep more than 130 families out of homelessness.

It should be an easy choice, but it will require real leadership.

This past week, we worked to pass protections for residents facing imminent eviction at three mobile home parks in Phoenix: Periwinkle, Weldon Court and Las Casitas, now called Beacon.

These protections hinge on creating a zoning designation that would keep these properties as mobile home parks. This would allow residents – like elementary student Daniel Ochoa and his five siblings, and U.S. Army veteran Gerald...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The author of this story believes that it is the fundamental right of the city council to force property owners to accept whatever zoning (and value) the city cares to designate. This is completely contrary to all property rights – and is one more example that woke journalists are completely insane. If a mobile home park owner wants to sell their land for redevelopment that’s completely their legal right. One of the fundamental underpinnings of socialism is the removal of the right to privately own property and this writer apparently thinks that’s a great idea.

Zip06: Attorney General Opens Inquiry Into Beechwood Park

Preview:

KILLINGWORTH

Attorney General William Tong has sent a letter to Sun Communities, Inc. management, opening an inquiry into longstanding property management concerns at Beechwood Community mobile manufactured home park on Route 81, according to a release issued by his office. The manufactured home park has been the epicenter of complaints by residents who claim a steady rise in rentals fees and the reduction of services has placed many residents on fixed incomes in a position where they may not be able to afford to stay in their homes.

Residents of Beechwood and several other area home parks owned by Michigan-headquartered Sun Communities...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

My guess is that Attorney General Tong is trying to get some PR in Connecticut for a future run for Governor or Congress and decided that this was a good way to get some free publicity. SUN is one of the best operators in the mobile home park sector and I am willing to bet that Tong is making a fool of himself for pretending otherwise. The good news is that SUN has a large budget for legal fees and I’m betting Tong is about to find out that there’s a whole other side to this story built on fact and paper trail ad not just the verbal allegations of a bunch of tenants. 

NBC Montana: Missoula considers turning mobile home park into resident-owned community

Preview:

MISSOULA, Mont. — Public comment is now open on a proposal to turn a mobile home park into a resident-owned community in Missoula.

The area is Bonnie's Place in the Franklin to Fort neighborhood.

In a meeting on Monday night, Missoula City Council considered granting more than $181,000 to a Montana nonprofit to help buy up the park.

Neighborworks Montana is leading the project with an estimated budget of just under $3 million.

The deal would preserve housing for 28 households that rent or own homes in the park.

According to city officials, if Bonnie's Place isn't purchased by March 21, it will be sold to an outside buyer and likely...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Spending $3 million to save a 28 space park from the wrecking ball equates to over $100,000 per household. Why not simply give each family $100,000 cash to go by a stick-built home with no lot rent. Sure, some may need to move to a different town, but what is Missoula really trying to prove here? It just makes no economic sense.

New York Post: Inside the Hamptons trailer park that’s become a playground for millionaires

Preview:

In the summer of 1998, Ken Hilderbrandt was contemplating buying a bigger boat — or a beachfront trailer on a wave-swept bluff in Montauk overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. 

“There was a [for-sale] sign on the window, rotted off,” Hilderbrandt, 85, told The Post, recalling the dilapidated trailer sitting on a 1,972-square-foot lot of land within Montauk Shores, the former seaside campsite for working-class vacationers, locals and surfers. Hilderbrandt, who owns a jet-ski rental business in Bellport, saw the potential. Sure, it was a fixer-upper off a dirt road — but the million-dollar ocean views pulled him in like a riptide. The asking...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

I find this article disturbing at the sheer amount of arrogant waste that some Americans indulge in today and the fact that the media relishes this type of over-the-top behavior. When you spend nearly $4 million for an 800 square foot mobile home on the beach, you are basically depriving a willing charity of $4 million that could actually do many people some good. If this buyer had donated that $4 million to St. Jude’s Hospital in Memphis (the non-profit that treats children with cancer for free) think of how many kids and families could have their lives changed. Or you could start your own non-profit and give the money to individuals in need. But to waste that type of money on literally nothing is a testament to the complete lack of moderation and morality which is currently ruining our society. I’m all for buying nice things, but this story is all about sheer and utter waste – literally burning $4 million in a bonfire. The fact that a media outlet would find it funny and cute is gross.

The Columbian: Local View: Rent control makes for healthier communities

Preview:

When my husband and I carefully planned for our retirement, we didn’t anticipate rent gouging. I have been a nurse for 43 years. I’m still working for Veterans Affairs as a nurse case manager. When my husband retired from his career as a business owner in 2019, we sold our home in Salmon Creek to downsize and cut back on our expenses, in anticipation of the need to make ends meet on a fixed income.

We moved to Woodland into a manufactured home we bought. When we moved here the monthly rent for space in this park was $685 a month. When we signed the paperwork, the property management said our rent won’t be increased within the first year....

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

As the State of Washington is debating rent control, some woke journalist put this story in the paper to attempt to sway politicians that rent control on mobile home parks is a good thing (see the above story). I’m sorry, but it you look at the articles by economists on the impact of rent control, they unanimously conclude that it’s a complete catastrophe in which nobody reinvests capital since you can’t get it back.

This article wins the dumbest media insertion of the week.

Patch: State Launches Inquiry Into Killingworth Mobile Home Park: AG

Preview:

KILLINGWORTH, CT — State Attorney General William Tong has launched an inquiry into longstanding property management concerns at Beechwood Community mobile manufactured home park in Killingworth.

Tong has received numerous complaints over the last year from Beechwood Community residents who have seen sustained, escalating rent hikes despite deteriorating conditions, according to a statement.

Beechwood residents, like many residents of mobile manufactured home parks, own their homes but pay monthly rent for the lot of land they sit on which covers various common amenities, including property maintenance.

Beechwood was acquired by Sun...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Not sure if Attorney General Tong knows who he is dealing with, but SUN is one of the largest and best REITs out there, with strong management and great properties. When the facts come to light, I’m betting Tong regrets this publicity stunt.

Peninsula Daily News: Housing proposals advance

Preview:

OLYMPIA — Whether you call it rent control or stabilization, the bill cleared a hurdle Friday as the 2023-2025 state legislative session approached the halfway point.

Two bills friendly to tenants and manufactured-mobile (MMH) homeowners were pushed ahead with “do pass” committee recommendations forwarded to their respective Senate and House rules committees, with the March 8 deadline to make it out of their chamber of origin fewer than two weeks away.

Friday was the tipping point for bills to pass out of committees from fiscal, Senate Ways and Means and Transportation committees.

One housing-related proposal that got the go-ahead adds...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

One more reason not to buy a mobile home park in Washington (as if you needed one). Of course, it’s a good idea to buy a demolition company because all of those parks are going to make great pad sites for Home Depot if this rent control law passes.

The Islander: Pines mobile home park owners proffer $16M sale to HOA

Preview:

The clock is ticking on the future of a bayside community in Bradenton Beach.

Homeowners in the Pines Trailer Park, 103 Church Ave., Bradenton Beach, must decide: Will they buy the park?

The Jackson Partnership LLLP of Bradenton, which lists Richard and William Jackson as partners, owns the land-lease community. In this case, the land lease allows the owner of the mobile home to lease the land where the home is situated. The most common land-lease communities are manufactured home communities.

The partnership made the homeowners association an offer Jan. 25 to buy the park for $16 million, according to some residents.

The offer triggered...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

OK, look at the photo of the homes. Then tell me how it makes sense for those folks to pay $183,000 each for their lots. Maybe these Floridians have not travelled much, but $183,000 will buy you a nice stick-built house in the Midwest for all cash. Why would you want to live in this park – based on the photo in the article – and not a nice, brick home on a golf course fairway in Kansas City for that same price? There must be more to Florida than meets the eye.

Bennington Banner: State grant will help Main Street sewer extension, connect mobile home park

Preview:

MANCHESTER — Several months ago, when more than a dozen state agency officials came to the Manchester Community Library to talk about ways towns could use federal American Rescue Plan Act dollars, interim Town Manager Leslie Perra and town Assessor Gordon Black were in attendance and asking questions about how those dollars might help the town extend sewer service up Main Street.

It paid off — to the tune of as much as $603,756 of the cost of running sewer service and water, from the library north to the Manchester Mobile Home Park. Word arrived Monday afternoon that the town had been awarded the grant, Black said.

That sum, or 20 percent...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

THIS IS A GREAT ARTICLE! This is win/win thinking by the city and state to help a mobile home park remain in that use and everyone is a winner.

wzzm13: 'Taps are bone dry' | Muskegon Co. mobile home park without water

Preview:

NORTON SHORES, Mich. — Residents of a Muskegon County mobile home park are hunkering down without any running water. 

One resident of Oaks Mobile Home Park is now coming forward after he says the park cut off their water on Monday without telling them.

"What do we do?" said James Barber.

Barber says he has called this place home for just about the last 16 years – yet, at the moment, he says it's unlivable.

"They're treating us like second-rate citizens, like we're peasants. And I'm fed up," he told 13 ON YOUR SIDE Wednesday.

Until the water is sorted out, Barber moved his fiancée and kids across town into a hotel room. 

"So...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Real smart to publicly shame a park owner who is trying to fix a broken water pipe but can’t get the part due to the “supply chain crisis”. When this owner shuts down and redevelops the park into a different use in the future, I’m sure he’ll tell the same newspaper “I’m shocked you didn’t see this coming as you were responsible for it”. Not sure if the writer did any research on this topic, but the City of Jackson in Mississippi has not had water in five months now https://www.foxnews.com/us/jackson-mississippi-preparing-go-without-water-periodically-for-up-10-years-crisis-continues.