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Aol: Inside new home-buying trend for Gen Z: ‘Houses before spouses’

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Meet the real estate experts who advise “houses before spouses” – recommending people buy homes with their friends to get on the property ladder.

Stephanie Douglass, 35, and Kristina Modares, 34, are co-founders of a real estate agency that specializes in helping millennials and Gen Z purchase homes with friends.

The duo started the company in 2019 after individually buying their first properties with pals and aimed to “break the barriers of traditional homeownership”.

Since then, Stephanie and Kristina have gone on to buy four properties together, which they say is an easier way to get on the property ladder.

Stephanie has bought an...

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Since our theme is “Fantasy vs. Reality” I had to include this idiotic article about young people speculating on homes in Austin, Texas. Yes, the same place that makes every list of the cities with the greatest odds for home price collapse, with articles such as this one: https://www.sfgate.com/realestate/article/austin-house-prices-are-falling-but-experts-say-19378718.php. Want to destroy yourself financially? Buy a single-family home with maximum debt load in a declining market. I know that HGTV had on all these shows like “Flipping Vegas” BUT ARE YOU AWARE THAT THE SHOW STOPPED FILMING IN 2014? ALL THOSE EPISODES ARE REPEATS. The single-family home flipping ship sailed years ago when 3% mortgages walked the earth and I’m sure you’ll revisit this article three years from now and the ending will not be the fantasy that was suggested. Before any young person follows this article’s advice, they need to talk to an old person who saw what happened to Austin real estate in 1990 and again in 2000. Heck, you can just call me!

Antelope Valley Press: Higher rents in mobile home parks are OK’d

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PALMDALE — The Housing Authority — which includes all members of the city council — on Wednesday approved a system for increasing rent at Palmdale’s three city-owned mobile home parks, as well as a method for assisting those most impacted by the increase.

The three parks — Boulders at Ranch I, Boulders at Ranch II and Boulders at the Lakes — have a total of 787 spaces, with three of these set aside for managers, according to the staff report.

Rents on the spaces have not been increased since 2008, when a cap of $400 per month was set; most spaces reached that maximum by 2013.

Operating costs have increased in the meantime, up 21%...

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PALMDALE — The Housing Authority — which includes all members of the city council — on Wednesday approved a system for increasing rent at Palmdale’s three city-owned mobile home parks, as well as a method for assisting those most impacted by the increase. Rents on the spaces have not been increased since 2008, when a cap of $400 per month was set; most spaces reached that maximum by 2013. Operating costs have increased in the meantime, up 21% from 2022 to 2023 and 17% this year. With the cap on rents keeping revenue stable for about a decade, the revenue is not keeping up with the costs of maintaining and operating the parks, Director of Neighborhood Services Sofia Reyes said during the authority’s March 20 meeting, when the matter was first introduced.

Holy Cow, here’s the City of Palmdale, California pushing back on critics to their recent plan to significantly raise the rents on three parks that the city itself owns. I never figured I’d see that – what a turn of events in today’s political climate. Groundbreaking.

Page Six: Tori Spelling: My daughter Stella, 15, was ‘shamed’ for living in RV, classmates thought she was homeless

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Tori Spelling is insisting her family never “lived” in an RV amid her money troubles, claiming they only rented the motorhome for “summer vacation.”

During the premiere episode of her new “Misspelling” podcast, the “Beverly Hills, 90210” alum shared a story about how her 15-year-old daughter Stella’s classmates thought her family was “homeless” after they were photographed in the RV on multiple occasions last year.

“My daughter is like, ‘People already talk about us at school. They know you and they know the family and they read the press,’” she recalled.

“She had someone come up to her at school and ask, ‘Are you in the school district,...

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I remember reviewing this article about a year ago, and clearly Spelling was actually living in the RV and not just using it for a vacation. The article I read back then included that Tori Spelling’s mother said that she offered to put the family up in a rental home but Tory Spelling refused. It’s clear to me that she was trying to invent this narrative hoping it would get her in the media somehow and re-ignite her career. What a pathetic group.

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 BASIS: 10

Antelope Valley Press: City ponders mobile home park rents

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PALMDALE — The Housing Authority — which includes all members of the city council — on Wednesday will consider a proposed system for increasing rent at Palmdale’s three city-owned mobile home parks, as well as a method for assisting those most impacted by the increase.

The Housing Authority and City Council meeting begins at 5 p.m. at City Hall, 38300 Sierra Highway. It may also be viewed online via the city website, cityofpalmdaleca.gov.

The three parks — Boulders at Ranch I, Boulders at Ranch II and Boulders at the Lakes — have a total of 787 spaces, with three of these set aside for managers, according to the staff report.

Rents...

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To aid those for whom any rent increase is too great a burden, the department is proposing an aid program that would use funds from the operations budget. Tenants would have to qualify as low-income, not be receiving other aid and reapply annually. The number of tenants aided each year would depend on available funds, according to the staff report.

OMG, not another non-profit owned park going bust? They now have to DOUBLE the rents on new residents to break even since they didn’t raise the rents annually to match inflation for over a decade. Are you spotting a trend here? And now the city is trying to turn this into some type of quasi-Section 8 mess. Do the voters in Palmdale realize how their money is squandered by these idiots on a daily basis?

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 BASIS: 8

INQUISITR: A Look Inside America's Most Expensive Trailer Park, Where a Mobile Home Costs $5.85 Million

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When one thinks of Malibu, visions of luxurious beachfront properties and sprawling mansions likely come to mind. However, nestled within this upscale coastal city lies a hidden gem — the Paradise Cove Mobile Home Park, which has gained notoriety for being the priciest trailer park in America.

With homes priced in the millions, this once humble residential area for fishermen and blue-collar workers has undergone a dramatic transformation, attracting wealthy buyers and celebrity residents alike. At the forefront of this trailer park's real estate market is a three-bedroom mobile home located at 247 Paradise Cove Road, currently listed at a...

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If you go to some of these over-the-top websites, you will find such novel items as 14K gold shotgun shells filled with 14k gold pellets, costing about $10,000 per shell. No way you can make sense of it, but apparently there are people so desperate for attention that they buy stuff like that. In this case, you have people spending $5 million to live in a trailer park. Not much difference.

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 SCALE: 7

The Bellingham Herald: Bellingham mobile home park’s affordability uncertain after residents’ land purchase attempt fails Read more at: https://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article287110085.html#storylink=cpy

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The future affordability of a Bellingham manufactured home park is uncertain after an attempt by the park residents to buy the land was unsuccessful and the community was sold to a new owner.

Lakeway Mobile Estates is a senior community made up of 218 individually owned manufactured homes on more than 28 acres in Bellingham’s Puget neighborhood. Residents pay a monthly fee to lease the land that their homes are on.

In December residents were notified by letter that the property owner intended to sell the community. Per city and state law meant to maintain affordable housing and prevent manufactured home park residents from being displaced...

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“We are sorry to hear that Lakeway Mobile Estates (the ‘Park’) is being sold for approximately $41 million,” the city stated in an email to a constituent about the sale. “We understand that the purchase price could result in a significant increase in lot rent, which many low-income residents at the Park will be unable to afford.”

OK, so let me get this straight. The residents were unable to pull off the purchase of the property for $41 million. So somebody else bought it for $41 million. The city was willing to cough up $7 million down payment. The private-sector buyer probably put down a little more than that, but close. With either party buying the property for $41 million there would be an identical note with identical interest rate and identical monthly payment. So then how exactly would the non-profit be able to buy it without raising lot rents just as high – or higher – than the private sector group would? The answer, of course, is that they can’t.

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 SCALE: 9

Bangor Daily News: Out-of-state investors own 1 in 5 of Maine’s mobile home parks

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More than a fifth of Maine’s mobile home parks are owned by out-of-state investors, with one of the nation’s biggest such companies becoming the major player here over the last decade.

It is part of a national trend that accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic and the housing affordability crisis that followed. Long ago, these parks were generally owned by the family owners who built them. Many of those owners are hitting retirement age and selling to corporate investors eager to scoop up some of the last bastions of affordable living.

Sun Communities, a Michigan-based real estate investment trust with a $16 billion net worth that says...

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Bradstreet and Becker think the solution mostly lies with state and local lawmakers. Earlier this month, Democratic Governor Janet Mills signed a bill into law that would force cities and towns to allow mobile homes on any lots zoned for single-family homes. That could alleviate cost pressure over time. “Supply will eventually keep the prices down,” Bradstreet said.

Here’s a reality check. A new mobile home costs around $80,000. The average residential lot in the U.S. costs $80,000. Add them together and you’ve got a $160,000 mobile home offering. So forcing cities to allow mobile homes on single-family home lots (which is never going to happen) and then putting $160,000 mobile homes on the market (as popular as selling dog poop sandwiches) is going to eliminate the affordable housing crisis in Maine?

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 SCALE: 10

Daily Montanan: Building stability through resident-owned mobile home parks

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In 2011, it was chance that took Marjory Gilsrud and her husband, Mike, to a home in the Madelia Mobile Village Cooperative. But it’s choice that has kept them in the resident-owned mobile home park in rural Minnesota.

Before her move to Madelia Mobile Village, the Gilsruds lived in a private mobile home park that got sold to an investment firm. Rent started rising while the home was in a terrible state of disrepair.

“We were paying $450 a month by the end,” Gilsrud told the Daily Yonder. “And the rents were increasing every six months like clockwork.”

The Madelia cooperative, located in the town of Madelia in Watonwan County, Minnesota,...

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This one quote sums up the article:

“We’ve increased lot rent only once in the last four years,” said Gilsrud. “And that was by $6.”

If the resident-owned property had a rent of $400 per month and raised it only $6 over four years, then that’s quite a feat since inflation went up over 20% in the past three years alone, which means they would have had to raise the rent by $80 a month just to cover increases in water, sewer, electric, property tax, insurance, etc. So, assuming the park was trying to keep the rent as low as possible when it was purchased four years ago, the park is now $80 per month per lot short on money. That means the park is probably not making any of the perpetual capital expenditures that need to be performed due to lack of funds. So by depriving the park of $80 per month per lot of income the property will eventually fall into complete disrepair. This is the problem when you have a bunch of tenants voting to increase rents – they never will.

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 SCALE: 10

Planetizen: Out-of-State Investors Buying Up More Mobile Home Parks

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Over 20 percent of mobile home parks in Maine are owned by out-of-state investors, reports Zara Norman of Bangor Daily News, sparking affordability concerns among residents and housing advocates.

“Long ago, these parks were generally owned by the family owners who built them. Many of those owners are hitting retirement age and selling to corporate investors eager to scoop up some of the last bastions of affordable living,” Norman explains. “Almost always, they immediately increase lot fees on the residents that typically own their homes and steadily raise rent thereafter. New parks are almost never built, keeping rents high.”

While the...

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In a trend that has accelerated since the pandemic, over one in five mobile home parks in Maine are owned by out-of-state investors.

How exactly is an “out-of-state” owner any different from an “in-state” owner? Let’s look at America’s largest retailer: Walmart. Except for Arkansas, every single Walmart store is an “out-of-state” owner. Same is true for every McDonalds not located in Illinois and every Hilton Hotel not located in Virginia. The truth is that where the owner lives means absolutely nothing.

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 SCALE: 8

KDRV: Mobile home park to face complete renovation

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PHOENIX, Ore. – Negotiations for a proposal and funding is expected to be improved in the coming months to replace the homes at Royal Oaks Mobile Manor. Oregon Housing and Community Services is working with the Housing Authority of Jackson County to provide a safe and healthy place to live. 

"When we last updated the community, we were developing plans to rebuild/rehabilitate the units. The planned approach was based on advice from OHCS’ consultants and informed by industry-standard best practices," said Delia Hernandez, OHCS public information officer. 

The mobile homes were brought to Phoenix from Idaho. On their arrival, many had mold...

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"When we last updated the community, we were developing plans to rebuild/rehabilitate the units. The planned approach was based on advice from OHCS’ consultants and informed by industry-standard best practices," said Delia Hernandez, OHCS public information officer.The mobile homes were brought to Phoenix from Idaho. On their arrival, many had mold and over 20 health code violations.

Can you imagine how much money is squandered by incompetent non-profits? Where do you find folks so bad at business skills that they bought a batch of mobile homes filled with mold?

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 BASIS: 10

Marin Independent Journal: Novato mobile home park explores forming cooperative

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Residents at the Marin Valley Mobile Country Club in Novato might form a limited-equity housing cooperative to purchase the city-owned lots their homes sit on.

“The residents are exploring options for self-ownership while we await the opportunity to get in the room to negotiate the ownership outcome with the city,” said Mary Currie, a board member of the Park Acquisition Corp., the community’s resident-led, nonprofit operator.

The city purchased the Marin Valley Mobile Country Club property for $20 million in 1997. Forty-one percent of the spaces are required to be occupied by low- or moderate-income residents, although a much higher...

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The city purchased the Marin Valley Mobile Country Club property for $20 million in 1997. Forty-one percent of the spaces are required to be occupied by low- or moderate-income residents, although a much higher percentage of the current residents have low incomes.The city intended the neighborhood to be financially self-sufficient with revenues coming entirely from tenants’ pad rental fees. However, a Marin County Civil Grand Jury report last year questioned the organization’s solvency.“Novato’s 2022-2023 adopted budget shows that in the past four fiscal years MVMCC’s expenses have exceeded revenues by a total of more than $3.6 million,” the report said.The grand jury said the city was paying about $200,000 a year to help cover the neighborhood’s utility costs. The grand jury also noted that in 2022 the city allocated $3 million of its American Rescue Plan Act funds to help pay for a sewer system project in the community.

Wow, what a shocker. The resident-owned community can’t pay its bills without ongoing subsidies that were not approved by taxpayers. Never saw that one coming.

STUPIDITY RATING ON A 1 TO 10 BASIS: 10

Bangor Daily News: Rents skyrocketed after out-of-state investors bought Maine mobile home parks

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WISCASSET, Maine — Twin mobile home parks sit on opposite sides of Route 27. They were once owned by two local brothers who kept the rent stable and performed timely repairs.

The McMorrow brothers paid at least $616,000 to buy the Whippoorwill and Maplewood Hill mobile home parks in 2006 and 2016, respectively. They aged into their 70s during the COVID-19 pandemic as the housing market peaked. That led them to sell the parks for at least $1.9 million in separate 2021 and 2022 transactions, real estate documents show.

A man from Idaho bought Whippoorwill, and a small team of Colorado investors with Maine ties bought Maplewood Hill. Both...

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From early 2021 to this year, 73-year-old Tom Kurtz’s monthly rent in Whippoorwill has nearly doubled — from $285 to $540. Maine home values have risen by 22 percent over that time, according to Zillow data. The new owner hiked Kurtz’s rent 32 percent when he took over and has raised it regularly. Similar hikes have come at Maplewood Hill.
What a manipulation of the facts! Of course the residents miss the old mom-and-pop owners as the rents were absurdly low, yet the new rents are still ridiculously low. Stick-built houses in Wiscasset, Maine are $306,000 so that 22 percent increase is $60,000. That 32 percent increase in mobile home lot rents is around $250 per month. What idiot can compare those two stats and say the mobile home one is way worse?
I’m sick of these articles written by obviously young, woke journalists that do not present facts but simply try to manipulate data to make their case in their weak attempt at persuasion.

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Out-Of-State Owners Bring Mobile Home Parks Back to Life and Maintain Rents At Ridiculously Low Levels”.

The Coast News: Escondido OKs rent hike at third mobile home park

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ESCONDIDO — For the third time since late February, the City Council has increased the rent for residents of a local mobile home park. 

As a result of the council’s unanimous March 20 decision, nearly half of the residents at Greencrest Mobilehome Park will see an average increase of about $20.45, averaging between $13.74 and $27.51. The increase will apply to 69 of the park’s 129 spaces, subject to rent control.

Before last week’s decision, the council approved rent hikes at Casa Grande Mobile Estates and Town and Country Club Mobilehome Park, both of which are age-restricted to seniors only. 

The city’s Proposition K, which voters...

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ESCONDIDO — For the third time since late February, the City Council has increased the rent for residents at a local mobile home park. As a result of the council’s unanimous March 20 decision, nearly half of the residents at Greencrest Mobilehome Park will see an average increase of about $20.45, averaging between $13.74 and $27.51. The increase will apply to 69 of the park’s 129 spaces, subject to rent control.

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Mobile Home Park Rents Go Up Less Than Every Other Form of Housing in Escondido”.

Detroit Free Pass: 'We're human beings': Michigan mobile home residents fight rent hikes, worsening conditions

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If Carla Kinsey's rent keeps rising, she worries she'll end up homeless.

For more than a decade, she has lived in Avon on the Lake, a community of manufactured homes for older adults in Rochester Hills. When she moved there in 2010, Kinsey was looking to settle in what she called her “final home.”  

But now, her rent, including the cost of the land where her home sits, consumes more than half of her monthly income. She pays more than $700 every month, up 57% since she moved in. 

If it wasn’t for food assistance benefits, she said she wouldn’t be able to eat. Kinsey — who is on a fixed income — is also juggling the cost of car and health...

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If Carla Kinsey's rent keeps rising, she worries she'll end up homeless. For more than a decade, she has lived in Avon on the Lake, a community of manufactured homes for older adults in Rochester Hills. When she moved there in 2010, Kinsey was looking to settle in what she called her “final home.” But now, her rent, including the cost of the land where her home sits, consumes more than half of her monthly income. She pays more than $700 every month, up 57% since she moved in. If it wasn’t for food assistance benefits, she said she wouldn’t be able to eat. Kinsey — who is on a fixed income — is also juggling the cost of car and health insurance and utilities. There’s not much left over. She can’t pick up a job because of a rare heart condition that forces her to wear an oxygen machine. “I feel trapped,” Kinsey, 71, said. “I can’t afford to move and I can’t afford to stay.”

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Despite $408,000 House Prices, Avon on the Lake Mobile Home Park Charges Only $700 Per Month!”.

The New York State Senate: Senator Helming and Senate Republican Conference Unveil Legislative Package to Expand Availability and Access to Affordable Housing

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Senator Pam Helming, ranking member of the Senate Committee on Housing, Construction and Community Development, with Senate Republican Leader Rob Ortt and members of the Senate Republican Conference, today unveiled a comprehensive legislative package to increase homeownership opportunities and improve access to affordable housing options.

The package proposes tax credits and incentives, reduces regulatory burdens, and facilitates new construction as well as improvements to existing housing stock.

“Housing affordability is one of the biggest issues facing our state. Our conference has a plan to revitalize our existing housing stock by...

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“Housing affordability is one of the biggest issues facing our state. Our conference has a plan to revitalize our existing housing stock by removing blight from our communities and replacing it with good quality housing units, to work with local communities on what housing strategies are best for them, to expand and create incentives for development, and to establish means-testing for rent-regulated housing to ensure that affordable housing units are occupied by those who truly need them. The legislative package we are putting forward today under the leadership of our housing ranker Senator Pam Helming will deliver affordable homeownership for the state of New York”.

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Big Talk in New York Yields Zero Results”.

The Berkshire Eagle: Manufactured homes across state face steep rent increases, residents push for stabilization

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If Jeani Warish won the Powerball, she would buy Rocky Knoll Estates in Taunton.

Warish, a 10-year resident of the manufactured housing community, more commonly known as mobile home or trailer parks, doesn’t play the Powerball, but she and other residents have long wished they could own the 158-lot park.

“We would buy the park and then we’d be able to keep the rents down, because any profit is not going to someone else, but back into the park,” Warish said. “That’s a dream for a lot of us.”

The residents of Rocky Knoll Estates have faced yearly rent increases. The monthly rent in 2013 when Warish moved in was $401. In 2024, it is $696...

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SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Residents Hate Rent Increases Regardless of How Minimal They Are”.

Connecticut Public Radio: New Maine law will allow manufactured homes on same lots as single family homes

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A new state law will permit manufactured homes to be placed on any lot that single family homes are allowed.

Advocates for the measure say they believe the law could reduce the stigma associated with manufactured and mobile homes and allow more Mainers to achieve homeownership for the first time.

State Rep. Dick Bradstreet, R-Vassalboro, also the director of the Manufactured Housing Association of Maine, said he believes the law will create more affordable options for more people.

"It's the quickest way for people to bring about personal wealth, build up equity in their homes," said Bradstreet, who also serves on the Legislature's Housing...

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SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “If You Own a Home in Maine -- And Are Next Door to a Vacant Lot -- You Better Sell Fast.”

Marketplace: These mobile home residents decided to buy their park to combat rising rents

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Mobile homes are an often overlooked but crucial part of this country’s affordable housing stock. While residents may own their manufactured home or trailer outright, they usually have to pay rent for the land it sits on. 

In California a group of mobile home park residents have done something that might seem impossible. They purchased their park from their corporate landlord, securing stable affordable housing for themselves. But the road to get there wasn’t easy. 

When Juanita Perez Sierra was seven years old, her parents moved their family of eight from San Miguel Cuevas in Oaxaca, Mexico, to the U.S. After weeks of living out of their...

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SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Non-Profits Squander $7 Million for 60 Families to Own a Trailer Park”.

Bridge Detroit: Thrive: Michigan mobile home residents feel ‘trapped’

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Hey BridgeDetroit readers! 👋🏼

Residents living in manufactured homes and advocates are fighting back against rent hikes and ‘deplorable’ conditions. 

One woman doesn’t let her son play outside in the summer because of the stench of sewage. 

Another worries that if her rent keeps rising, she’ll end up homeless.

They both live in manufactured housing — the largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing in the country, particularly for seniors and low-income households. But advocates say that type of housing is quickly becoming unaffordable as private equity firms buy up parks and hike up rents.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been...

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They both live in manufactured housing — the largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing in the country, particularly for seniors and low-income households. But advocates say that type of housing is quickly becoming unaffordable as private equity firms buy up parks and hike up rents.

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Mobile Home Park Rents Increase to Market Levels Yet Are Still the Least Expensive in the U.S.”.

autoevolution: Fabulous Mobile Home Merges Old Southern Elegance With Hotel-Style Luxury

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Few concepts in the world of tiny living are as unique and ingenious as the Kew West capsule collection created by O'Hara. This prestigious mobile house company in France drew its primary inspiration from a very unique source – the architecture of the classic houses we see in the southern states of the US. It happened in a very personal way. Annette and Louis-Claude Roux took a memorable trip to America in the early '90s and were deeply impressed by the local mobile home phenomenon.

They also happened to be the founders of one of the most luxurious boat-building companies in Europe, currently operating as Groupe Beneteau. An auspicious...

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In other words, the O'Hara mobile homes look like Old Southern mansions and feel like ultra-expensive hotels.

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Over-Exaggeration Runs Rampant in Mobile Home Sales Materials”.

Iowa Capital Dispatch: DNR: Davenport mobile home park has excessively polluted creek for years

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An aging mobile home park on the north side of Davenport has for nearly two decades avoided upgrading its wastewater treatment system and excessively polluted a creek that flows through the city, according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

The DNR recently fined the Mt. Joy Mobile Home Park and its owner Daniel Peeters $10,000 for failing to comply with a 2016 court order to remedy the situation, failing to monitor and report the ammonia and bacteria it was discharging, and for not reporting wastewater that bypassed the system in 2023, a department order said.

The “failure to implement necessary improvements and report the...

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Jones said the project might cost more than $1 million. “The treatment system is old,” said Terry Jones, a senior environmental specialist for the DNR. “It was installed in the ’70s and can’t meet the more stringent ammonia and E. coli limits that were put in their permit several years ago. They were supposed to upgrade the system so that they could meet those limits, and they never did.” In 2019, an attorney for Mt. Joy sent a letter to the state “stating the cost for wastewater improvements were beyond what his client could afford,” DNR records show. In early 2020, Mt. Joy submitted a plan to the DNR to demolish its treatment facility and replace it. The department Mt. Joy has sought unsuccessfully to connect to the wastewater systems of Davenport and Eldridge, he said.

SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Changes to Wastewater Laws May Put This Mobile Home Park Out of Business Unless $1 Million Can Be Found from an Out-Of-State Buyer”. 

Petaluma Argus-Courier: Arbitration leads to $118 rent increase for Youngstown mobile home residents in Petaluma

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An arbitrator has issued a long-awaited decision on proposed rent increases at Petaluma’s Youngstown Mobile Home Park, raising rates more than residents had hoped, but not nearly as much as the owner had sought.

The arbitrator granted park owners a permanent monthly rent increase of $118 per mobile home space, retroactive to Dec. 1 last year.

The rent hike was unwelcome news to residents, who say they are already squeezed by climbing monthly charges. But it was far below the more than $900-per-month increase the park owners sought going back to January 2023.

"We feel it’s a loss for everyone in the park and everywhere else,“ said Jodi...

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SUGGESTED HEADLINE: “Park Owners Work Hard to Maintain the Lowest Rents in Youngstown”.

KSL: Navajo Nation to inject $74M into manufactured home facility for new housing, to spur economy

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PAGE, Arizona — The Navajo Nation is pumping nearly $75 million into a manufactured housing firm leaders hope will ease the housing crunch on the reservation, create jobs and spur economic activity.

Per the arrangement with ZenniHome, a startup builder of manufactured housing, the Navajo Nation will pump $24 million into construction of a new, larger ZenniHome facility adjacent to its existing plant in Page, Arizona, near the Utah border and within Navajo Nation territory. That new plant will enable ZenniHome to bolster production, and, parallel to that, the Navajo Nation plans to spend another $50 million to buy around 200 of the...

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That new plant will enable ZenniHome to bolster production, and, parallel to that, the Navajo Nation plans to spend another $50 million to buy around 200 of the prefabricated homes from the new facility.

Wait a minute, they’re going to spend $50 milion for 200 mobile homes – that’s $250,000 per home! Now I know that non-profits make the worst financial decisions on earth but this one’s record breaking. Why not just call the local Clayton dealer and get the exact same thing for $50,000? Something’s fishy about this story.

Globe St.: Manufactured Homes Get Improved Access to Financing

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A relatively new plan of the Biden administration should improve financing for manufactured homes though an update in Title I of the Fair Housing Act.

On the last day of February, the White House released a document on boosting housing supply and lowering costs. One part was about manufactured homes, the “largest form of...

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If you set aside $165 million for mobile homes for the whole U.S., that’s only $3.3 million per state. That’s absolutely nothing. 8% of Americans live in mobile homes. There are 300 million Americans, so 8% is 24 million people. Assuming 3 per household, that’s around 8 million mobile homes. So the government has allocated literally $20 per home for help. Ouch. This story sounds much grander than the reality. When you actually look at the numbers it’s … nothing.

WTSP: Mobile homeowners in Pinellas County still deciding what to do after being told raise homes or leave

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PINELLAS COUNTY, Fla. — There are about 80 mobile homes at the Twin City Mobile Home Community and nearly as many opinions from residents who are figuring out what to do after Pinellas County sent them “substantial damage” letters after Hurricane Idalia flooded the park in August 2023.

Some have already moved, others are attempting to sell for as much as they can, but most are just going to stay and see what happens after a June 1 deadline. That’s when the new hurricane season begins and is when their temporary occupancy notices expire.

Only one resident we talked to wanted to go on camera, however, they say they feared harassment...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Well, you basically raise your home up in the air or you leave. There’s no salvation coming from the city as they no doubt will delight in getting the park removed. That was probably the intention from the start. Don’t forget Ronald Reagan’s classic quote “the nine most dangerous words in the English language are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”.