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Tampa Bay Times: Residents in low-lying Pinellas mobile home park told to elevate houses or leave

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Residents of Twin City park, which is in the Gandy area, say it makes no sense to spend as much as $50,000 to elevate homes that are valued at half that amount — or less. Some have nowhere to go and plan to stay as the summer deadline approaches. Others say they intend to move out of Florida because of hurricanes, sea-level rise and flooding.

“I’ve done it for 10 years,” said Douglas McVey, who replaced the floors in his home five times after storms. “I’m done.”

In October, Pinellas County sent letters to residents of 82 Twin City homes, including McVey, requiring that they elevate or evacuate their homes by June 1. It’s the first time in...

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Pinellas County has ordered dozens of residents in a frequently flooded mobile home park to elevate their homes to nearly 11 feet or leave by the start of hurricane season in June. Residents of Twin City park, which is in the Gandy area, say it makes no sense to spend as much as $50,000 to elevate homes that are valued at half that amount — or less.

Common Sense Perspective: Pinellas County finally found a way to shut down the trailer park which had probably been on their to-do list since the time of Jimmy Carter.

Artblog: Documenting lives and housing of the vulnerable, Amy Ritter’s Mobile Home Archive

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I’ve been watching Amy Ritter’s work grow over the past decade, experiencing her shows, and from emails and conversations we had about art, life, affordable housing, low income, and class issues in America, and more. Her extensive research, experience, and process helps to archive, preserve, and share overlooked and marginalized areas of American culture, specifically the population who live in mobile home parks. Her sensitive lens evokes a kind of humanity, complexity and dignity that is not always seen in representations of people who live in these communities. Having grown up in a double-wide trailer in rural Pennsylvania, the artist...

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Our thoughts on this story:

These communities have been made even more vulnerable because corporate investment companies buy the land that mobile home parks sit on, then charge steep rent hikes that stretch low income households to their limits. These companies often neglect the grounds, and because these homes are not actually mobile, this puts entire communities at great financial risk.

Common Sense Perspective: When a mobile home park changes hands from a mom-and-pop owner to a corporate owner the rents go up to pay for the needed capital expenditures to bring it back to life, as well as professional management and the higher prices of carrying the correct amounts of insurance, etc. The intent of the new owner is not to stretch the affordability of those few households that have substandard incomes, but to provide a better quality of life for the majority of households who welcome the changes and are more than happy to pay the increases. That’s the concept behind all urban reclamation and progress. As for this focus on the fact that mobile homes can’t move, the truth is that all homes since 1976 CAN move at any time, but nobody does so because there is no place cheaper to live than the mobile home park. It’s not a question of holding residents captive but instead offering a product so good that nobody ever wants to leave.

autoevolution: The Honeylion Is a Colorful, Luxurious, Huge Mobile Home for the Entire Fam

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Honeylion is the latest completed build from Columbus, OH-based company Modern Tiny Living, or MTL for short. This particular builder specializes in custom units, but it also offers a series of models to choose from as a starting point. Like many other U.S.-based builders, MTL is also leaning into park models as the preferred alternative between traditional housing and compact tiny homes.

Put differently, park models are the compromise solution to downsizing and living a more mobile and intentional lifestyle. They're still mobile because they sit on trailers, but their dimensions allow you to move them around only with special permits. On...

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Honeylion definitely wants to be that: a premium, super fancy mobile home for a family looking to downsize in style and total comfort.

Common Sense Perspective: Based on these photos this home is absolutely not capable of delivering on any of these claims as far as I can tell.

WCAX: $15.5M awarded to Vt. mobile home parks for infrastructure upgrades

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BURLINGTON, Vt. (WCAX) - Millions of dollars are on the way to dozens of mobile home parks across Vermont to fix inadequate or failing wastewater, drinking water, and stormwater systems.

The $15.5 million in federal funding from the American Rescue Plan Act will go to 46 mobile home parks.

“These investments support safe, affordable housing for historically underserved or economically disadvantaged communities, and help residents in manufactured housing communities overcome barriers to fixing water infrastructure issues. Healthy Homes has been an important part of our housing strategy for years, and I hope the Legislature continues to...

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The $15.5 million in federal funding from the American Rescue Plan Act will go to 46 mobile home parks.

Common Sense Perspective: Good news for park owners, bad news for inflation.

Highland News-Sun: High rent, abandon home

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Surging lot rents in mobile home parks have forced retirees in Highlands County to abandon their homes and move away.

Three retirees whose lot rent increases are forcing them out agreed to tell their story to the Highlands News-Sun.

Ron Hall has lived in his manufactured home in Bonnet Lake Estates in Avon Park for decades. The 80-something retired masonry contractor may have to abandon his home in the lot where it sits. He can’t afford to move the home to a less-expensive mobile home community.

“I don’t know where I’m going to move,” Hall said. “I’m going to try to get into low income housing. I’ll just have to leave my house here....

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Ron Hall has lived in his manufactured home in Bonnet Lake Estates in Avon Park for decades. The 80-something retired masonry contractor may have to abandon his home in the lot where it sits. He can’t afford to move the home to a less-expensive mobile home community.

Common Sense Perspective: Has anyone ever considered the concept of just … selling the home where it sits? Following the logic of this article, any real estate you can’t move should be abandoned. That means that every single-family home in America should be abandoned instead of listing it with a realtor. Maybe the dumbest article of 2024 so far.

KRCR: Internal affairs commission stalls Chico's mobile home park rent ordinance debate

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CHICO, Calif. — An ongoing push to bring a mobile home park rent stabilization ordinance to Chico hit a roadblock Monday afternoon.

The city's Internal Affairs Commission decided not to move forward with a recommendation to the city council on an ordinance. Councilmember Addison Winslow was the only city official on the three-person council who backed some form of a rent stabilization ordinance, but he couldn't garner the support of his other two colleagues. Vice Mayor Kasey Reynolds cited concerns with legal liability from a potential ordinance.

The decision was met with the ire of dozens of mobile home park residents in attendance, many...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Thank heaven for America’s dysfunctional legal system in which citizens sue each other more than any other country in the world. Apparently, it even has the Chico city hall spooked:

The city's Internal Affairs Commission decided not to move forward with a recommendation to the city council on an ordinance. Councilmember Addison Winslow was the only city official on the three-person council who backed some form of a rent stabilization ordinance, but he couldn't garner the support of his other two colleagues. Vice Mayor Kasey Reynolds cited concerns with legal liability from a potential ordinance.

But then again, maybe the residents used a bit too much gaslighting in their crazy narratives such as this one and scared the sane adults in the room:

"When rent goes up and when PG&E goes up, we’re gonna have more homeless people. I just felt a lack of compassion," said resident Jean Marquardt.

It’s possible that the two other folks on the Internal Affairs Commission were more focused on the damage that rent control does to the supply of affordable housing (causing rents to actually increase) rather than the DEI-focus on “compassion”.

I don’t know how anyone does business in California, but I know I won’t be one of them.

Archinect: White House announces initiatives to boost manufactured housing

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The White House has announced a series of moves to increase the production of manufactured housing in the United States. The initiatives are intended to both preserve and rehabilitate existing manufactured home communities and ease barriers to the construction of new units.

The moves include a $225 million funding opportunity for existing communities, overseen by HUD. The Preservation and Reinvestment Initiative for Community Enhancement (PRICE) will support the preservation and revitalization of manufactured housing communities, including the replacement of dilapidated homes, assistance for repairs and upgrades, and improvement of...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Let’s be honest, there is a huge delay between when something is talked about and when it actually happens. An enormous lag time. We’ve been hearing about these “affordable housing initiatives” from the Biden administration for three years now and have seen nothing come of it. With only eight months left until Biden’s era is over (according to the polls) does this narrative have any value at all? Not much. It reminds me of what Teddy Roosevelt told the native American leaders when they complained about their treatment by the U.S. government: “we shall endeavor to persevere” which means, actually, absolutely nothing.

Mountain View Voice: Mobile home park redevelopment in Palo Alto stirs excitement, frustration among residents

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When Palo Alto teamed up with Santa Clara County in 2017 to buy the Buena Vista Mobile Home Park from the Jisser family and avert the park’s planned closure, residents and elected leaders heralded the deal as a huge victory for the community.

With the city and the county each kicking in $14.5 million for the purchase and Santa Clara County Housing Authority contributing another $24 million through federal funding to pay for necessary repairs, residents who had been bracing for eviction since 2012 could now breathe a sigh of relief. The council, for its part, could take solace for having preserved 117 units of affordable housing and having...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Can there be any other mobile home park story with more hypocrisy than Palo Alto and their lone trailer park. Having gone to Stanford and having driven by this eyesore myself while heading to Taco Bell to stay up all night to cram for exams the fake commitment of the city to “save” the property from redevelopment is finally exposed with the announcement that they are going to tear it down and redevelop the land into nice, new, upscale things:

With the city and the county each kicking in $14.5 million for the purchase and Santa Clara County Housing Authority contributing another $24 million through federal funding to pay for necessary repairs, residents who had been bracing for eviction since 2012 could now breathe a sigh of relief. The council, for its part, could take solace for having preserved 117 units of affordable housing and having prevented displacement of more than 300 residents. Now, Buena Vista is preparing for its next phase. Its new operator, Housing Authority, submitted last month a formal application for redeveloping the park at 3980 El Camino Real. The plan calls for splitting the park into two sections and constructing a three-story, 61-unit apartment building in one section. The other would remain a mobile home park, with 44 spots for new coaches, which could be either mobile homes or recreational vehicles.

What makes this story even more ridiculous is that the non-profits cobbled together around $40 million to outbid the group that initially wanted to buy and redevelop the land. And now they are doing exactly the same thing that the developer proposed back in 2012.

So what was the actual point of all this? Clearly the politicians behind the purchase, at that time, were trying to win votes from lower-income Palo Alto residents (which are few in number) and wealthy residents who want to virtue-signal (which are large in number) and now the politicians and their supporters have moved on to new things and could care less what happens to the residents.

Click Orlando: Apartments proposed for abandoned mobile home park in East Orange County

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ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. – News 6 asked what you would like to see us focus on in the 32825 ZIP code and you answered.

Many people have concerns about the now-abandoned Lake Downey Mobile Home Park.

We found there are potential plans in the works, but the timeline is still unclear.

It started with a message that came into our “Hits the Road” portal.

“The condition of the now abandoned Downey Park Mobile Home Park is an embarrassment to the 32825 community and to the county,” a News 6 viewer wrote.

All of the tenants were evicted from the Lake Downey Mobile Home Park last summer because the developer is trying to sell the property.

[EXCLUSIVE: 

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Just as the caterpillar turns into the butterfly, the trailer park turns into the apartment complex. The only thing holding that metamorphosis back is higher lot rents.

The Texas Tribune: An East Texas town has put strict limits on mobile homes — again

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LUFKIN — When Rita Kromer’s home of 50 years burned to the ground in 2021, she considered replacing it with a mobile home to keep her costs down.

Kromer was stunned to learn the Huntington City Council had approved an ordinance less than a year prior prohibiting the placement of mobile homes on lots designated for single family homes. They could only be placed in the city’s five existing mobile home parks.

Incensed, Kromer successfully mobilized Huntington residents demanding the East Texas city council rescind its decision. She celebrated by placing her new mobile home on her property.

But two years later the Huntington city council...

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Let’s cut through the B.S. and admit that nobody wants a mobile home to be placed next to their stick-built home. Even my small town of 4,500 people bans mobile homes on residential lots. However, my town recently passed an ordinance allowing tiny homes on those same lots. So the problem is not people living in smaller dwellings. The real problem is simply the “looks” of a mobile home and the stigma that goes with it. It’s 99% an aesthetics issue, and we all know that mobile homes exteriors are not as attractive as they could be. You are never going to be able to get cities and towns to allow mobile homes on residential lots until you get them off those stilts and down on the ground. Skirts are only a plus if you own a clothing store or are located in Scotland.

Mackinac Center: The last thing Michigan needs is rent control for mobile home parks

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Lawmakers in Michigan are considering bills that would impose rent control on mobile home operators. Five bills before the Senate create many new regulations, including restrictions on owners of manufactured housing communities. Instead of determining their rental rates independently, they would have to submit any rent increases above the inflation rate to a state board for approval.

Controlling prices is the wrong way to get affordable housing. Supporters of rent control want to make it easier for low-income families to afford rent. The best way to achieve that goal is through competitive markets. Markets, not state rules, are what allow...

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A shockingly intelligent article:

Controlling prices is the wrong way to get affordable housing. Supporters of rent control want to make it easier for low-income families to afford rent. The best way to achieve that goal is through competitive markets. Markets, not state rules, are what allow people get better products at lower prices.

The Berkshire Edge: West Stockbridge mobile home park residents decry rent hike amid community conditions

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West Stockbridge — The town Rent Control Board has much to mull over following more than two hours of testimony at its February 28 session, with tenants of mobile home community The Residences on Mill Pond pitted against the park’s new owner who is seeking a rent hike that will triple the current fees.

Tom Lennon, Lennon Capital Group’s corporate agent, filed a Petition for Rent Adjustment at the end of last year, seeking an increase in rent from $241 monthly—as it has been since 2013—to a maximum of $797.51 monthly from tenants of the 35-lot mobile home community at 40 Albany Road, West Stockbridge. The issue came before the local Rent...

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Our thoughts on this story:

So residents are paying $241 per month lot rent – unchanged since 2013 – in a market where apartments cost $1,900 per month. And they are up in arms about the owner increasing the rents to around $790 per month, which is 50% less than the apartments down the street. Maybe they don’t understand the position that they’re in. Here, I’ll help them out: if the rents don’t go up by at least that amount or more the owners are going to tear the park down and build apartments. How can these people be this blind?

The Northern Light: Modern design unveiled for proposed east Blaine manufactured home park

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East Blaine developers unveiled their proposal for a luxury manufactured home park during a February 27 community meeting, signifying the first time the developers presented the project after over a year of arduous debate in planning commission and city council on whether manufactured home parks should be allowed in east Blaine.

JIJ Corporation owners Skip and Katie Jansen, who are developing the project, along with Craig Parkinson, principal engineer at Cascade Engineering Group, provided project details to a group of people packed into the Blaine Harbor Boating Center during the Tuesday morning meeting. Two officers monitored the room,...

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This is what many mobile home parks will look like in 50 years. But you better get ready for $1,000+ per month lot rents to make it happen and justify the capital cost to make this conversion.

Cascadia Daily: Residents near deal to buy mobile home park in Bellingham

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Residents at one of Bellingham’s smaller mobile home parks, on Samish Way, are getting ready to celebrate the purchase of the property where their homes sit.

Meanwhile, those who live at the much larger Lakeway Mobile Estates are scrambling after initial work on a deal to buy their site fell through.

The deal on Samish Mobile Home Park should close by March 15, said Victoria O’Banion, who leads acquisitions for ROC Northwest, a program of the Northwest Cooperative Development Center that supports resident-owned communities. O’Banion has been steering Samish park residents through the transaction for the past few months, helping them...

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Ouch, that’s probably not what the writer wanted to include in a woke “residents need to own their own parks” article:

Off Lakeway Drive, however, a deal simply couldn’t get done, O’Banion said. In a Feb. 13 letter to Lakeway residents, O’Banion gave ROC Northwest’s “professional estimate” of the value of the park property as “a minimum $35 million.” Even with the benefit of a grant and a very low-interest loan for part of the sale, the total loan package “would be unaffordable for many people in the community and would create an unacceptable risk of nonpayment for lenders,” the letter said. ROC Northwest estimated that the loan repayments, coupled with the cost of day-to-day maintenance and operation of the park, would result in a rent increase of “well over 100 percent,” O’Banion said.

So what they’re saying is the rents would have to double for the park to continue in operation at the current value. What an admission. I hope the residents remember this lesson learned when the next private-industry buyer takes over and doubles the rent to make the numbers work. They can’t complain as they have already scientifically proven the necessity for that increase.

FEE Stories: Trailer Park Houses Are the Original Tiny Homes

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Given that “redneck” and “hillbilly” remain the last acceptable stereotypes among polite society, it isn’t surprising that the stereotypical urban home of poor, recently rural whites remains an object of scorn. The mere mention of a trailer park conjures images of criminals in wife-beaters, moldy mattresses thrown awry, and Confederate flags.

As with most social phenomena, there is a much more interesting reality behind this crass cliché. Trailer parks remain one of the last forms of housing in US cities provided by the market explicitly for low-income residents. Better still, they offer a working example of traditional urban design...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Well, this is a description I have never seen before:

We ironically find in many trailer parks a kind of traditional urban design more common in European and Japanese cities.

I think what they are driving at is that mobile home parks are so high in density for detached structures.

KQED: To Fight Rising Rents, These Fresno County Residents Bought Their Mobile Home Park

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After years of fighting rising rents, a group of mostly Oaxacan farmworkers in Fresno County have done the seemingly impossible: purchased their mobile home park from its corporate landlord.

The group officially closed escrow on the park Thursday.

Previously called Shady Lakes Mobile Home Park, it will now be known as Nuevo Lago Mobile Home Park. The park will be run by a board of directors, made up of residents. Each household will have a small ownership interest in the park, which will be operated as a limited equity housing co-op. They’ll be able to make decisions about how much rent to charge, park finances and operating rules.

 

Our thoughts on this story:

OK so let me get this straight. The non-profits paid $7.6 million for 60 lots, which equates to around $130,000 per lot. And the lot rent is being raised, as a result, to $500 per month from around $400 per month. So now let’s go where the journalist that wrote this never went: the actual financial impact. Current interest rates on a mobile home park like this is around 6%, so the interest alone on this deal is around $456,000 per year. At a $500 per month lot rent, using a more than generous expense ratio of 30%, and with 60 lots total the projected NOI is 60 x $500 x 12 x .7 = $252,000. That’s right, the total projected net income s only enough to cover 50% of the interest on the loan. This deal was probably structured on a short-term loan that the non-profit cobbled together. It will ultimately come due and, with these numbers, this deal will never clear the trees. There’s no way this deal could have been put together at $7.6 million in the private sector, which is probably exactly why the seller was probably more than happy to unload it on the residents. And it also means the rent will have to be around $1,000 per month for this park to continue in operation once the subsidies end. 

Virginia Mercury: General Assembly offers new hope for aging mobile home parks

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While many of the costs that have contributed to inflation over the past three years have begun to moderate, there is one that hasn’t: housing. Over the past year, housing and related costs account for two-thirds of the increase in the core Consumer Price Index. Pick up any newspaper or follow news feeds online and you are certain to see reporting on the housing crisis that we are facing in most of our communities.

A report issued last month by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University found that the extended period of rising rents during the pandemic has put unaffordability at all-time highs for renters. For the first...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Manufactured homes, including those located in parks, represent one of the largest components of unassisted affordable housing in the nation. In Virginia, mobile home parks provide some of the most deeply affordable housing in many of our communities. But these parks are increasingly at risk as many long-time, traditional park owners are aging and looking to sell as they retire. At the same time, large, national real estate investors are increasingly interested in purchasing these previously ignored assets. When parks are purchased, rents rise and frequently tenants also become responsible for water and sewer payments as well as other fees. Since 2020, Virginia’s Department of Housing and Community Development has received 146 notices of Intent to Sell or Purchase Offer from park owners, indicating how active this market has become. Park residents face challenges that typical apartment renters do not. If they own their mobile home, as many do, they have little choice but to pay higher lot rentals and absorb utility bill transfers since they are unable to move their homes. The term “mobile” is a misnomer; these homes are mobile only to the extent that they are transported to their initial location. After that, the cost and impracticality of moving them means that they stay put. Legislation is pending in the General Assembly that offers some relief. Del. Paul Krizek’s House Bill 1397 offers local governments, tenants and nonprofit organizations the opportunity to purchase parks when sales are pending to preserve affordability and improve living conditions. There is evidence that this approach can work. Common Sense Translation: To bring old mobile home parks back to life, the new owners must increase rents significantly. Residents don’t like to pay higher rents. They don’t need to move their homes if they have a better deal as they could just sell the homes where they sit, just like any other single-family home. The real reason they don’t move is because the cost of every other form of housing is significantly higher than living in a mobile home park. When bureaucrats opine on giving the tenants the first option to buy the park they know full well that the success rate for that concept is something like .0000000001% but it gives them an out to pretend like they really do care and to then shift the blame to non-profits who won’t co-sign the mortgage.

The Post and Courier: Mobile home park gets a new life in Mount Pleasant, where affordable housing is scarce

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MOUNT PLEASANT — Mobile home parks across the Charleston area have been closing in recent years to make way for new developments. But there's a notable exception taking shape in this affluent town.

The 36-home Arbor Point mobile home park is expected to start welcoming renters in the next month or two, not far from Coleman Boulevard, across from the Christ Our King church complex on Russell Drive.

The less-than-4-acre property was for decades the Shade-A-Plenty mobile home park. After owner Barbara Leviner died in 2020 there was an attempt to rezone it, which the town rejected, and then it was sold in mid-2023 for $3.5 million.

Isle of...

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Our thoughts on this story:

The less-than-4-acre property was for decades the Shade-A-Plenty mobile home park. After owner Barbara Leviner died in 2020 there was an attempt to rezone it, which the town rejected, and then it was sold in mid-2023 for $3.5 million. Unlike mobile home parks that rent land to people with homes they own, Arbor Point will own and rent all of the units. Branning said rates for the two-bedroom, two-bathroom homes have not been decided.

Apartment rents have also been soaring, up 39 percent in Mount Pleasant over the past four years, according to Apartment List. The estimated monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in the town was about $2,100 at the start of 2024. Refurbishing Shade-A-Plenty with new units avoided the need for zoning approval from Mount Pleasant since the land was already being used for that purpose. Town planning director Michele Reed said the area is zoned for single-family homes, but the mobile home park could continue to operate as an existing "nonconforming" use. Unlike the neighboring city of Charleston or Charleston County, Mount Pleasant has not devoted millions of dollars to affordable housing. And the town has prohibited new multifamily housing, such as apartments, for the past seven years and is in the process of extending that moratorium for two more. Common Sense Translation: The new park owner outsmarted the city and is converting the park into “detached apartments” which is exactly the housing subset the city has been trying to block for years through aggressive zoning laws intended to ban them.

autoevolution: This Tiny Is Going for the Ideal Family Mobile Home With Big Bedrooms and Plenty of Space

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Tiny houses first rose to prominence in the early 2000s as more environmentally friendly alternatives to regular homes that promised less clutter, more intentional living, and, as such, a happier lifestyle. In recent years, they've become even more popular for their promise of lower monthly costs, higher affordability without the ever-present threat of a 30-year mortgage, and the ability to move around with it in tow.

Park models still deliver all these benefits but in a larger footprint that should – at least in theory – do away with the biggest downside of downsizing: spatial constraints. In most territories, park model tiny homes can...

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The Tellico is for sale now at a discounted price of $162,000, which includes the furniture and appliances shown in the video tour below. For this kind of money, you're promised nearly the same comfort of a proper home but with a smaller footprint, which should convince aspiring downsizers to take the leap and make the transition.
Common Sense Translation: Do you seriously believe that somebody is going to pay $162,000 for that thing? The folks that need to live in a tiny home have one common characteristic: a very small budget. At that price point I think closing on a sale would be more difficult than Biden walking up stairs.

Peninsula Daily News: Sequim extends its mobile home moratorium

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SEQUIM — A Sequim moratorium on redevelopment of mobile/manufactured home parks has been extended through Aug. 14.

The Sequim City Council unanimously approved the six-month extension on Feb. 12 to prevent any redevelopment of mobile/manufactured home parks in the city until a new zone can be created that protects the home types.

Doug Wright, a manufactured home resident, said at the Feb. 12 meeting he sees hope in the city’s actions.

"I see seniors with hope finally because something has been done to alleviate the fear they live with every day,” he said.

Wright said with the city creating provisions to preserve residents’ homes, it “can...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Manufactured home residents have testified for more than a year to city leaders and staff that rent and/or leases continue to go up and that many of them are on fixed incomes and increases are making it difficult to buy necessities. They’ve also feared that, as manufactured home parks are being sold, they could be redeveloped. Judy Hatch, a manufactured home resident, spoke at the city’s Feb. 6 planning commission meeting, saying her park has seen an increase of $125 more a month and that, for some people, that equals their monthly food costs. She’s also been concerned about her park’s owner potentially selling and losing her home to redevelopment without anywhere to go. Common Sense Translation: You can’t have it both ways. You either like living in the mobile home park at the new rent or you need to move out. You can’t say you hate the park but also that you hate having to leave. There’s no way that the rents are NOT going to go up and still have the property remain as a mobile home park. This is no different that the grifter that goes to McDonald’s, orders the burger, eats most of it, places a cigarette butt under the bun, and then demands a refund from the manager for selling a dangerous hamburger. The residents are not going to get something for nothing – only the federal government engages in that misguided behavior. You can use the same argument on any U.S. product or service that inflated costs are taking away from food or other expense line-items. It’s an absolute fact that America is completely out of control with inflation and all Americans face tough choices. But is the park owner going to let the residents live in the park and lose money doing it? Absolutely not, so give up on that argument.

BNN: Pittsfield and West Stockbridge Face Staggering Manufactured Home Rent Increases

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In the quiet corners of Berkshire County, a storm is brewing over the proposed rent hikes for manufactured home communities in Pittsfield and West Stockbridge, Massachusetts. At the heart of this controversy are the residents of Lake Onota Village in Pittsfield and the Residences on Mill Pond in West Stockbridge, who are facing potential rent increases of up to 64 percent and 230 percent, respectively. These proposals shine a light on the broader issues of affordability, regulation, and the sustainability of living in manufactured homes.

The Case for an Increase

Represented by attorney Jeffrey T. Scrimo, the owners of Lake Onota Village...

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Our thoughts on this story:

Represented by attorney Jeffrey T. Scrimo, the owners of Lake Onota Village have laid out a plan to hike monthly lot rents by $210 over the next three years. This adjustment would catapult rents from their current range of $330-$380 to $540-$590, marking a significant financial strain on the community's residents. The justification behind this steep increase is attributed to a significant rise in operational expenses since the last rate adjustment in 2012, with the owners aiming to achieve a 'fair rate of return'. The proposed hikes are not just numbers on a page; they represent a looming affordability crisis for the residents of these communities. Manufactured homes, often praised for their affordability and accessibility, are becoming less so as rental costs for the land they occupy skyrockets. Common Sense Translation: The rents have not been increased in twelve years. Going from $330 per month to $590 per month over twelve years equates to around a $22 increase annually. That’s ridiculously low. Stop whining about this more-than-reasonable increase and be thankful that you have found the lowest cost housing in the city.

KTVH: Helena mobile park residents struggling with rent increase

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HELENA — It is no secret that Montanans are facing a housing crisis. With high rent and limited availability, finding a place to live can feel impossible. Residents of one mobile park in Helena say things keep getting worse.

Pam Kifer has lived at the Dakota Valley Mobile Home Park for three years.

She said, "I don't want to go to the homeless shelter. I've been there before."

When she moved in, the lot rent cost $395. On March 1st, it will increase to $675 a month.

"The first time he raised it, I had to change my life. I was doing senior companions, and I had to quit that job because it didn't pay enough to accommodate his raise," Kifer...

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Pam has lived at the Dakota Valley Mobile Home Park for three years. She said, "I don't want to go to the homeless shelter. I've been there before." When she moved in, the lot rent cost $395. On March 1st, it will increase to $675 a month. "The first time he raised it, I had to change my life. I was doing senior companions, and I had to quit that job because it didn't pay enough to accommodate his raise," Kifer said. Common Sense Translation: $675 per month is not excessive lot rent at all, in most markets. But if you were in a homeless shelter three years ago it makes sense that you should probably not be in the mainstream housing market and need to get on Section 8 or a similar government program because you really can’t afford to live in the modern world without assistance. It’s also a pretty safe bet that you don’t actually reflect the opinions or financial status of the rest of the mobile home park residents.

The Columbian: Residents in Hazel Dell mobile home park dealt losing hand after rent control bill dies in Washington Legislature

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Several residents of a Hazel Dell senior mobile home park gambled that rent stabilization legislation would pass — and lost.

Their landlord at Meadow Verde had asked them to sign a lease agreement that included a discounted rent increase if they signed by Sunday. Some of the residents weren’t due to sign a new lease for almost a year.

The discount tempted many of the residents who live on fixed incomes. But they believed the early rental agreement was an effort to lock them in at rent increases higher than the 7 percent cap in a rent stabilization bill before the Legislature. So they didn’t sign, putting their future in the hands of...

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Several residents of a Hazel Dell senior mobile home park gambled that rent stabilization legislation would pass — and lost. Their landlord at Meadow Verde had asked them to sign a lease agreement that included a discounted rent increase if they signed by Sunday. Some of the residents weren’t due to sign a new lease for almost a year. The discount tempted many of the residents who live on fixed incomes. But they believed the early rental agreement was an effort to lock them in at rent increases higher than the 7 percent cap in a rent stabilization bill before the Legislature. So they didn’t sign, putting their future in the hands of lawmakers.Then, on Monday, that legislation — House Bill 2114 — effectively died when the Senate Ways and Means Committee refused to vote on it. “We really had a lot of faith in our elected officials on both sides to do what’s right. They failed the people that needed them most,” Bart said. Common Sense Translation: Ronald Reagan summed it up when he said that the nine most dangerous words are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help”. Rent control is such a bad idea – with plenty of economic stats to prove it – that even crazy, woke Washington couldn’t bring itself to pass it and the residents bet on the wrong horse when they believed the hollow promises of today’s bureaucrats.

The Berkshire Edge: West Stockbridge trailer park rent hike issue heats up as February hearing nears

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West Stockbridge — A proposed monthly rent increase that would more than triple the current rent for residents at The Residences on Mill Pond, a West Stockbridge mobile home community, has riled a former resident as well as an official of a nearby town who weighed in on the potential effects of such a fee hike.

On November 27, Tom Lennon, corporate agent for Lennon Capital Group LLC, as the owner of the 35-lot mobile home community at 40 Albany Road, West Stockbridge, filed a Petition for Rent Adjustment, requesting the West Stockbridge Select Board—that sits as the West Stockbridge Rent Control Board—approve a surge in rent from $241 per...

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“The fact that the owner decided to purchase a park that was in such poor condition is not the problem of the residents of the park,” Kerswell said. “The cost of fixing the utilities is not on the residents, it’s on the owner. Because the park was in failure—the septic and the water and all these systems are in failure—he cannot pass that cost along to the tenants.” Common Sense Translation: Well, if that’s the attitude of the tenants then they better not be shocked when the new owner shuts the park down and turns it into a different use (probably apartments). There are two ways to go through life namely 1) win/win and 2) win/lose. If the residents think there’s a win/lose option (in which they hold all the cards and the property owner holds none) then the tenants are going to probably soon learn an important life lesson when the eviction notices go out. They should instead be sending “thank you” cards to the new owner and happily paying a higher rent that fends off redevelopment.

SoMd News: Lord Calvert trailer park residents hear potential timeline

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As she left Cornerstone Church on Sunday, Carla Mattingly felt a little bit better about the situation she and her fellow residents from Lord Calvert Mobile Home Park are in.

Developers Cherry Cove are mulling a 2012 plan to turn the Lexington Park site into housing, and residents have recently become fearful of eviction.

But a 45-minute presentation by St. Mary’s Commissioner Mike Hewitt (R) at the California church helped ease some of those fears.

“It’s very unsettled,” said Mattingly, who has lived in the trailer park for the past several year, “but I feel a little better.”

“I feel in peace, I feel good, I feel better,” said...

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Hewitt said the owner of the park must fix the water and sewer, so one option is to repair that and “leave the trailer park like it is, and that is the primary option right now.” Another possibility is to close the park, replace the water and sewer and build new apartments and townhouses, though Hewitt added “this option is becoming very expensive”. The final option would be to sell the trailer park to a new owner and the new owner would decide what to do.  Common Sense Translation: There is zero probability that the park owner is not going to tear the park down and build apartments and townhouses.

“They have not presented any plans to the county for approval, and they won’t do that for at least another six months,” Hewitt stressed. “Once they do that, the process to approve whatever plan will be 6 to 12 months. So if they intend to do this it will be at least 18 months to 24 months until anybody is impacted.” Common Sense Translation: You better start packing because this thing is coming down in 18 to 24 months – and the zoning department will fast-track the plans for the redevelopment faster than a hypersonic missile.

“St. Mary’s County does not want to have people homeless, so we have land that the county owns,” Hewitt said, referring to parcels on Pegg Road and on FDR Boulevard near Route 4. “These two pieces of property we intend to build townhouses and apartments.” Common Sense Translation: We are going to charge $2,000 per month for these apartments and townhouses so don’t bother to apply.

Hewitt said residents can show property owners that “you are committed to your community and committed to keeping the neighborhood nice.” Common Sense Translation: If you were dumb enough to believe the earlier statements then we thought you might even buy this one.