Mobile Home Park News Briefing

Mobile Home Park Investing Audios | Mobile Home Park Investing Videos | Mobile Home Park Mastery Podcast



Rochester Business Journal: ‘Right of first refusal’ law may hinder investment in manufactured home parks

Preview:

Homeowners within manufactured home parks now have the right of first refusal should the property owner enter an agreement to sell.

The homeowners and/or the affiliated homeowners association must be provided with details of a proposed sale and then would have 60 days to indicate their intent to match the offer. That match would then need to be completed within 140 days.

The legislation was signed into law on Wednesday by Gov. Kathy Hochul and is meant to give residents “a fair shot at protecting their communities from owners who don’t share their vision for the mobile home park,” bill sponsor James Skoufis (D-Cornwall) said in a news...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

At least one person in the room is still sane:

But the new requirement may adversely impact investment, said Jeff Cook, CEO of Rochester-based Cook Properties, the state’s largest owner of manufactured housing communities. “This onerous extra step represents another hurdle for owners and potential owners of these communities, who will now think twice about making investments in New York,” Cook said. 

It would be interesting to know how this “tenant right of first refusal” concept began in the first place. It certainly is not based on fact. Currently over 99% of mobile home park transactions do NOT include the tenants buying the park. Anyone who has ever sold a park to the tenants knows that it takes forever and a huge percentage of those then fail to materialize (as no non-profits want to guarantee the debt, which is required).

These kind of laws make as much sense as giving each and every person in the State of New York the first option to buy the Brooklyn Bridge – and about as useful.

SRQ Magazine: Steube Wants Mobile Home Parks Eligible for FEMA Support

Preview:

The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides reimbursement and support to individual homeowners for debris removal after storms. But U.S. Rep. Greg Steube, R-Sarasota, said after Hurricane Ian struck South Sarasota County, it took a special waiver to allow private mobile home parks and homeowner associations to receive the same support.

The congressman on Friday filed legislation in the House to formalize a process and allow private communities to receive FEMA assistance. The Clean Up Disasters and Emergencies with Better Recovery and Immediate Support (Clean Up DEBRIS) Act would make any common interest community, including housing...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

MY HAT IS OFF TO THIS GUY!

Steube said the mobile home parks and communities he dealt with had the same recovery needs as individual homeowners and should receive the same support.

America needs more politicians like this guy – people who don’t waste time on nonsense (tenant first options that never materialize) and focus on real issues like putting homes back together after a major storm and flooding.

Bravo!

AZ Central: Central Phoenix trailer park to be replaced with housing to serve the 'missing middle'

Preview:

Housing, offices and a small-scale restaurant or cafe are part of a proposed redevelopment in central Phoenix on a site that used to include a mobile home park.

Phoenix-based Venue Projects bought the 2.5-acre site at 14th Place and Highland Avenue in 2017, Lorenzo Perez, co-founder of Venue Projects, said.

“My business partner, Jon Kitchell, and his wife live in that neighborhood,” Perez said. “For years, Jon had been trying to acquire the park. He was drawn to the old 1950s trailers on the site.”

Modern mobile home park was the hope

When they bought the park, Venue Projects had intended to rehabilitate the site as a trailer park, with...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

It’s interesting how people can be manipulated by a “spin”. In this case you have a group that bought a mobile home park, found the land was worth more in a different use, and was able to demolish the park without any pushback because they claimed it was all about focusing on this corny “missing middle” spin. The guy with the boatyard project in the earlier article should have told the city he was working on the “missing middle” and they would have said “yes, that’s extremely important to our city so go ahead and tear those last two trailers down” – without even knowing what he was talking about.

Reminds me of when they re-labeled “garbagemen” into “environmental engineers”. My hat is off to the “missing middle” label – pure genius.

102.9 Rewind Radio: Cranbrook curbside waste & recycling collection no longer being offered for strata communities, mobile home parks

Preview:

The City of Cranbrook’s curbside garbage and recycling collection services will not be offered to strata communities and mobile home parks following a decision from city council last night.

This decision comes amid higher costs for equipment and fuel while gripping with a need to hire more staff.

Service levels among staff and collection equipment are nearing capacity, and adding new neighbourhoods in strata and mobile home parks will strain service levels in the community.

The City says it realizes it may need to revisit this decision as Cranbrook continues its growth and development.

See more information from the City of Cranbrook...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

If this article says what I think it says, the city is discontinuing curbside trash just to mobile home parks due to city budget constraints. Obviously, that makes zero sense. Why are mobile home park residents singled out as not being worthy of curbside trash? Personally, I think the park owner should go to HUD and get their opinion on this.

2 Urban Girls: Senior citizens set to be displaced from Carson mobile home park Nov. 1

Preview:

Court Hearing Scheduled on October 31, 2023 to Decide Their Future

Low-income seniors are threatened with imminent eviction from their homes by a multi-billion dollar development corporation at Imperial Avalon Mobile Estates (located at 21207 Avalon Boulevard in Carson, California).

The developer ordinally sought approval to close the Mobile home park, displacing a total of 373 Carson citizens from their homes, during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic. The approval process was supposed to include public participation, but lockdown orders in place at the time prevented many residents from meaningfully participating the City Planning...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Only in California …

The approval was ultimately granted in 2020, in part based on promises from the developer to ensure no resident would become homeless through the closure process. As the closure process comes to an end, the developer has failed to ensure the residents are relocated to safe and affordable, local housing as promised.

How can you task a mobile home park owner with what the U.S. Government itself can’t even accomplish (the waiting list for Section 8 is years long, right?). Where in the world would you find cheap housing in California and what keeps any resident from simply saying “I don’t feel this proposed housing is safe and affordable, in my opinion”?

What a stupid, stupid provision.

Bangor Daily News: New law hopes to keep investors out of Maine’s mobile home parks

Preview:

A new law goes into effect Wednesday that proponents say will curb investor activity in Maine’s manufactured housing market, which is on the rise.

LD 1931 will require the owners of manufactured housing communities — sometimes known as mobile home parks — to give residents notice if the land under their homes is going to be put up for sale. Though many people own their manufactured homes, they don’t own the lots under them and pay a monthly fee to rent those from a landowner.

About 10 percent of Maine’s population lives in a manufactured home, according to U.S. census data.

Landowners now have to give residents 60 days from the time of...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Yet another state wants to drink the Kool-Aid that “resident first option to buy mobile home parks” is the solution to world hunger, global warming, drought and pestilence. If I got a dollar for every mobile home park that is successfully purchased by the residents in Maine. I’d have … zero dollars.

Hoodline: Sonoma County Proposes Change in Mobile Home Park Rent Policy for Enhanced Housing Affordability

Preview:

Sonoma County Board of Supervisors has proposed a change in policy to limit annual rent increases at mobile home parks to no more than 4 percent or 70 percent of the Consumer Price Index, whichever is less.

According to the County of Sonoma, Board of Supervisors Chair, Supervisor Chris Coursey, has highlighted the precarious housing state for many mobile home residents. He noted that these individuals often have fewer alternatives and struggle to manage rent increases on their park spaces.

The amendments discuss not only a cap on rent increases but also permit park owners to increase rent by up to 5 percent with each change in home...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Sure, you saw this article came out of California and you thought “oh boy, I bet this is going to be stupid”. Well, this article met your expectations. Now Sonoma, California wants to reduce the amount of rent mobile home park owners can raise each year to only 70% of CPI. Yes, that’s right – not even CPI. How does that make sense? It doesn’t. Just another reason to avoid California as a real estate market.

Missoula Current: MOBILE HOME RESIDENTS ARE SEIZING THE OPPORTUNITY TO BUY THEIR PARKS

Preview:

(Washington State Standard) Mobile home parks are coming up for sale and there are signs that a new law giving residents a chance to buy them is working.

Since mid-July, 11 properties have gone on the market in Washington and residents of seven are using tools from the three-month-old law to pursue ownership, the state House Housing Committee heard Thursday.

The other four “didn’t pencil out for folks,” Brigid Henderson, manager of the Manufactured/Mobile Home Relocation Assistance Program told lawmakers.

There are 1,169 registered mobile home parks and manufactured housing communities in Washington. Collectively they have 65,175 spaces...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Now you have the State of Washington trying to emulate the new laws of New York on tenant first right of refusal. That means that Washington park owners may also now have to wait an additional 70 days while their tenants do absolutely nothing to buy the park but simply waste time and energy. Again, this concept has a 99% FAILURE RATE! That’s the actual stat. Why would anyone bother to spend time crafting and enacting laws that fail 99% of the time? Because it panders to their base, who have no idea how pointless it all is apparently.

M Live: Developers plan to resubmit Ann Arbor-area mobile home park plans after judge’s ruling

Preview:

WASHTENAW COUNTY, MI - Property owners and developers who have proposed a roughly 500-unit mobile home park north of Ann Arbor will move forward with their plans after a favorable court ruling in a yearslong legal battle with Ann Arbor Township.

Trial Court Judge Carol Kuhnke ruled on Wednesday, Oct. 25, that a 1975 court order permitting mobile home development on nearly 140 acres on both sides of U.S. 23 north of Warren Road was valid, something township officials have contested in court.

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

It’s rare that the court sides with the mobile home park developer, but this is one of those occasions. Of course, it will probably be appealed over and over and we may not know the ultimate verdict for years. By then the city will probably come up with a plan to take the property through eminent domain to build a green space (it’s happened before).

Times Union: State steps in again to ask mobile home park owner to refrain from harassing tenants

Preview:

SARATOGA — For the second time, the state has asked the owner of a mobile home park on Saratoga Lake to stop harassing and threatening tenants with eviction, allowing rattled residents a temporary reprieve from the owner's wish to accelerate redevelopment plans.

The state Division of Homes and Community Renewal sent a letter Sept. 26 to owner Michael Giovanone, reiterating that he must preserve the 3.2-acre Saratoga Lakeview Mobile Home Park as a park until 2026. 

“This letter is also meant to remind you of your legal obligation to fulfill your duties under the Park’s contract to purchase and the Certification you signed on March 31, 2021,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Same pathetic story as last week. A guy wants to redevelop a dilapidated trailer park into a nice boat storage business. But the bureaucrats will go to any lengths to block him because there are two trailers left in the park and the powers that be have some rationale that the single most important thing on earth is that this guy be denied his right to finish clearing the property until 2026. I know none of the facts but simply reading this article leads you to the conclusion that 1) either somebody at the city or state has it in for this guy or 2) the city and county leaders are basically worthless. But then you realize the property is in New York and you think “oh, ok now it makes sense”.

AXIOS Richmond: Richmond's new affordable housing idea: Reimagining mobile home parks

Preview:

Just over three years ago, Bermuda Estates mobile home park in Chesterfield desperately needed repairs. It was filled with aging trailers and neglected infrastructure.

  • Today it's a community in bloom, with a newly paved main road and dotted with cheerful front porches on some of the new homes, backyard vegetable gardens and proud residents eager to show off their flower beds.

What's happening: Project:HOMES, a Richmond-based affordable housing nonprofit, purchased the park in 2020 through a unique partnership with Chesterfield County with the goal of keeping residents in their homes and keeping those homes affordable.

Why it...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This article is incredibly misleading. This is a 46-space park that was purchased by a group of non-profits at a cost of around $2.5 million. On top of that they are putting in what looks like new $100,000 front-entry singlewides and then selling them at a “subsidized” loss of an additional $75,000 per home. So each lot, with home, is costing the non-profits around $130,000 in cash out of their pocket, plus another $25,000 by the tenant, for a total of $155,000. Now I’ve never been to Richmond, VA but I can’t believe that spending $155,000 for a trailer in a trailer park is the best use for that money. These residents could buy regular stick-built homes with nice yards for that amount.

If the title of this article had been “Richmond Spends $155,000 per Household on a Trailer Park” it would probably not have the same positive perception. I wonder if the folks who give to these non-profits have any idea of how their money is spent and if they are OK with all of this?

Patch: Fort Lauderdale Mobile Home Park Residents Ordered To Leave, Prompting Anger And Concern

Preview:

FORT LAUDERDALE -- Dozens of homeowners gathered Monday night pleading for help to stave off eviction at Pan American Estates Mobile Home Park in Fort Lauderdale after receiving notices to vacate the property.

Several residents who live in the 239 homes received letters informing them that they had to move heir single- or double-wide units out the park by April 22.

The eviction letter said residents who are current with their rent for space to park their home in the park qualify for incentive payments. And those with a valid title who vacate the park by Dec. 15 could receive between $9,875 and $14,500, according to the letter.

 

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The property owner has the right under Florida law to develop this site into any purpose they desire – including having it revert back to raw farmland. Residents have absolutely no legal right to block that owner’s right. It’s called basic American property law. Sure, the residents don’t want to leave because their rent was dirt cheap. But that’s why the park is shutting down, right? You can’t have it both ways. As I’ve said for a decade now LOW RENTS = REDEVELOPMENT.

Kelowna Now: Fate of West Kelowna trailer park to be discussed this week

Preview:

The fate of an existing trailer park in West Kelowna will be up for debate this week.

On Wednesday, West Kelowna’s advisory planning commission (APC) will be reviewing a rezoning request for the property at 2355 Marshall Road.

Kerr Properties is seeking council’s approval to rezone the property from the Manufactured Home Park Zone (RMP) to the Light Industrial (I1) Zone to make way for a storage unit business.

A staff report says the property falls within an area that has been identified for “industrial objectives” under the city’s Official Community Plan.

The property is adjacent to Highway 97 and in between Westlake Road and Horizon...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

A group buys an old mobile home park and is going to tear it down to make way for a new self-storage facility. When asked why the park has to be torn down, the owner responds with:

“many of the homes are “well beyond” their economic life and the park itself has experienced ongoing domestic water, sanitary sewer and road infrastructure issues”

Yes, that’s right. The park needs a ton of capital-intensive work and the owner doesn’t want to do it. But when a private equity group or other new buyer tackles this type of project -- to bring an old park back to life -- they are assaulted with criticism. There probably was a rent level in which this park was worth more as a mobile home community than as a self-storage building, but it was clearly not hitting that mark. Once again, LOW RENTS = REDEVELOPMENT.

Bangor Daily News: New law hopes to keep investors out of Maine’s mobile home parks

Preview:

A new law goes into effect Wednesday that proponents say will curb investor activity in Maine’s manufactured housing market, which is on the rise.

LD 1931 will require the owners of manufactured housing communities — sometimes known as mobile home parks — to give residents notice if the land under their homes is going to be put up for sale. Though many people own their manufactured homes, they don’t own the lots under them and pay a monthly fee to rent those from a landowner.

About 10 percent of Maine’s population lives in a manufactured home, according to U.S. census data.

Landowners now have to give residents 60 days from the...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The title of this article has nothing to do with reality. The new law would require park owners to give residents a couple months of advance notice if they want to sell, so the residents can somehow band together and buy the park under a “resident-owned communities” fantasy. But here’s the problem. The residents will never be able to pull that off 99% of the time (that’s the actual statistic). Only a bureaucrat with zero real-life experience would think this is even important enough to waste the time to debate and try to pass into law. The politicians must have needed something new to pander to their base over and this was low-hanging – but meaningless – fruit.

The Deming Headlight: Snatching up the ground under mobile homes

Preview:

Over time, words with beautiful meanings occasionally get degraded into ugliness. “Gentle,” for example.

Originally meaning good natured and kindly, it was twisted into “gentry” in the Middle Ages by very un-gentle land barons seeking a patina of refinement. Then it became a pretentious verb — to “gentrify” — meaning to make something common appear upscale.

And now the word has devolved to “gentrification,” describing the greed of developers and speculators who oust middle-and-low-income families from their communities to create trendy enclaves for the rich.

The latest move by these profiteers is their meanest yet, targeting families with...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

What a crazy world we live in today.

Over time, words with beautiful meanings occasionally get degraded into ugliness. “Gentle,” for example. Originally meaning good natured and kindly, it was twisted into “gentry” in the Middle Ages by very un-gentle land barons seeking a patina of refinement. Then it became a pretentious verb — to “gentrify” — meaning to make something common appear upscale. And now the word has devolved to “gentrification,” describing the greed of developers and speculators who oust middle-and-low-income families from their communities to create trendy enclaves for the rich.

The truth is that progress is terrific and the desire to live a better life is what has fueled all the great things that society has created from nice homes to quality healthcare. As part of the continual quest for better living there is continual displacement. Obviously, nobody likes to see the 80-year-old forced to find a new home, but you have to weigh the benefit to hundreds of people versus the detriment of a few. That’s how society makes decisions: by majority rule. It’s the basis of our political and economic system.

Times Union: State steps in again to ask mobile home park owner to refrain from harassing tenants

Preview:

SARATOGA — For the second time, the state has asked the owner of a mobile home park on Saratoga Lake to stop harassing and threatening tenants with eviction, allowing rattled residents a temporary reprieve from the owner's wish to accelerate redevelopment plans.

The state Division of Homes and Community Renewal sent a letter Sept. 26 to owner Michael Giovanone, reiterating that he must preserve the 3.2-acre Saratoga Lakeview Mobile Home Park as a park until 2026. 

“This letter is also meant to remind you of your legal obligation to fulfill your duties under the Park’s contract to purchase and the Certification you signed on March 31, 2021,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This guy wants to redevelop his mobile home park into boat storage, which the zoning is correct for and already adjoins the tract. But the city is making him wait for five years to start the project despite the fact that there are only two mobile homes remaining on this piece of land. This whole situation sounds beyond idiotic to me.

KUNC: Organizing mobile-home owners as investors gobble up parks

Preview:

Like a lot of his neighbors, John Sullivan looks down his Apple Tree Park street and across the Colorado River toward the small Western Slope town of New Castle and wonders about the future.

The 290-space mobile home park where he has lived for 25 years has one of the more picturesque settings among the 50 or so such parks, large and small, that dot the region from Aspen to Parachute.

The streets and yards are lined with mature trees to provide ample shade in the summer, and there’s a good-sized community park where children can play and families gather for picnics. Many of the spaces even overlook the river — albeit with Interstate 70...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Yet another article in which the writer claims that it’s “evil” for big companies buy up poor condition mobile home parks, inject capital into them, bring them back to life, and then raise rents. In fact, the writer sums up the problem with four words in a sub-heading “rules and raising rents”.

OK, if you want to live in a dirt-road dump then that should be your right. But that is NOT what 99% of mobile home park residents want – and it’s insulting to insinuate they do. They want to live in a nice, clean, safe place with working utilities, professional management and strong rules enforcement and they are willing to pay up for that.

This article reminds me of the 2020 push to “defund the police” in which woke journalists made their case that Americans hate law enforcement and prefer complete anarchy. Does anyone still believe that?

What’s “evil” is when you force 99% of the park residents to live in squalor to accommodate the 1% that like to live that way.

The Land: Op-ed: Nonprofit owner always intended to force Euclid Beach Mobile Home residents to move. It’s not too late to save their affordable housing.

Preview:

In December 2021, the nonprofit Western Reserve Land Conservancy bought the 28.5 acre Euclid Beach Mobile Home Community in Cleveland’s North Collinwood neighborhood from a Texas developer for $5.8 million. After buying it, they completed a year-long planning process with other stakeholders to determine the future of the property and surrounding area. In February of this year, Western Reserve Land Conservancy (WRLC) announced their decision to turn the entire lakefront property over to the Cleveland Metroparks, creating a signature new lakefront park on Cleveland’s east side and forcing residents to move by August 31, 2024. 

The decision...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Back in the 1980s the town of Watauga, Texas took an eminent domain action to rid themselves of some ramshackle old businesses that ruined the drive-up approach to their city. The business owners complained that they could not find alternative, cheap retail space and many shut down. But the look of the town improved overnight, new housing developments popped up, and around 10,000 people benefitted greatly from the loss of about 10 businesses. That’s called “progress” and it happens every time something is torn down to make way for a better use.

In this case a dilapidated mobile home park is being razed to make way for a new lakefront development. The entire town is thrilled but around 50 residents hate it. They will have to just accept it and move on.  

Times Standard: Humboldt County supervisors OK mobile home park rent control guidelines

Preview:

Editor’s note: this story has been corrected to state that Andrew Ditlevsen from Hopkins & Carley’s was referring to automatic inclusion of all residents in rent reduction claims when he said it would be brand new to him at last week’s board of supervisors meeting.

The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors approved a full set of guidelines Tuesday for rent stabilization in mobile home parks, the result of a 2016 voter initiative that aimed to protect tenants living in parks in unincorporated areas of Humboldt County.

Planning Director John Ford said the guidelines came out of Zoom workshops with tenants and park owners, from a 2019...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

When a Midwesterner reads articles like this it makes them think “why would anyone want to own property in California?” What a nutty place to own a business!

Central Maine: Waterville Planning Board delays vote on additional lots for mobile home park

Preview:

WATERVILLE — Planning Board Chairwoman Samantha Burdick on Tuesday chastised the new owner of a mobile home park off West River Road for what she said are ongoing problems with flooding, poor roads, issues with rats and cracking slabs beneath homes.

 

The discussion about Countryside Mobile Home Park at 457 West River Road arose when the board was asked to approve a sewer main modification at the park and approve two additional lots there that were supposed to have been approved beforehand by the Planning Board, but were not. Two double-wide homes were placed on the lots.

The board voted 6-0 to approve the sewer main modification, but...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Looks like planning board member Samantha Burdick has been hanging out with the guy pictured in the above article:

Planning Board Chairwoman Samantha Burdick on Tuesday chastised the new owner of a mobile home park off West River Road for what she said are ongoing problems with flooding, poor roads, issues with rats and cracking slabs beneath homes.

So let me get this straight – the park owner is responsible for flooding (Act of God), ‘poor” roads (can she please define because they look fine in the photo), rats (Act of Mother Nature) and ‘cracking slabs beneath homes” (which have zero impact on safety or home condition -- and how can she see them anyway?).

It would be refreshing if Burdick could just be honest and probably say “I hate trailer park residents and I don’t want two more houses full of them in my city”, right? Never going to happen.

Pensacola News Journal: Oakstead Mobile Home Park resident has ongoing problems

Preview:

Resident Paul Buckney goes through paperwork documenting ongoing problems at the Oakstead Mobile Home Park at 901 Massachusetts Avenue in Pensacola on Thursday, Oct. 19, 2023.

Resident Paul Buckney points out trash and one of several dilapidated structures at the Oakstead Mobile Home Park at 901 Massachusetts Avenue in Pensacola on Thursday, Oct. 19, 2023.

Resident Paul Buckney talks about ongoing problems at the Oakstead Mobile Home Park at 901 Massachusetts Avenue in Pensacola on Thursday, Oct. 19, 2023.

Resident Paul Buckney points out trash at the Oakstead Mobile Home Park at 901 Massachusetts Avenue in Pensacola on Thursday, Oct. 19,...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is more of a photo expose than an article but it might be leaving out some important facts:

  1. If those are abandoned homes then the landlord has no ability to secure them or make any repairs until they receive title to the homes via an abandonment process, which can take months (or even years in some states). So if that’s the case then you can’t blame the park owner as their hands are completely tied.
  2.  If that trash is on occupied lots then the park owner has no ability to get rid of it without the involvement/permission of the person renting the lot. And, on top of that, it’s the tenant’s responsibility.

But another key part of this article is “why can’t the complaining resident just pick up the trash themselves?” I mean in the time they spent complaining they could pick up every piece of litter in the photos. I am always picking up litter in mall parking lots and everywhere else I go and I’m sure you do, too.

Every photo of this park – including the park office – shows it is well maintained. There are two sides to every story and this writer is sadly presenting only one of them.

BDN: The big ideas from Maine lawmakers to ease the housing crisis

Preview:

Maine lawmakers will try to push zoning and tax changes, increased affordable housing production and more rent assistance through the State House in 2024.

Housing was among the major topics addressed on the list of nearly 300 bill titles proposed for next year’s legislative session. It was released Friday on the heels of a landmark state report that found Maine needs to construct at least 76,000 homes by 2030 to house its existing and future residents.

The contours of the debate will be familiar. A housing reform bill last year had to be watered down to get around concerns from municipalities. Similar changes proposed by Democrats could...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

Didn’t really see any “big ideas” in this article. I’ve been to Maine and some of these ideas are not even as good as having L.L. Bean start knitting affordable homes in a number of attractive yarn colors – and with a lifetime guarantee.

New York Post: Bronx Little League field surrounded by trailer park that houses migrants

Preview:

A Bronx Little League facility is a real diamond in the rough — surrounded by a growing, makeshift, migrant-friendly trailer park, frustrated parents and coaches said.

More than two dozen motor homes, camping trailers and even a converted school bus — many of which appear inoperable — languish along Allerton and Bruner Avenues near Astor Little League in Baychester.

The 26 parked vehicles are accompanied by generators, propane tanks and rank trash piles — and at least one is inhabited by a group of five recently-arrived migrants.

The RVs “make me uncomfortable,” said Andrés Rodriguez, 60, whose 10-year-old son, Andruyulo, has practice...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This is not a story about a “trailer park”. It’s a bunch of RVs parked along a road by a baseball diamond. Sure, it’s a terrible idea to let people live in a school bus and to have complete strangers that near to little kids, but this is not a story about a “trailer park”. So why did the New York Post not accurately substitute the words “RV” for “trailer” – which they correct in the article itself? Because the average American sees the words “trailer park” and hopes to read about sex and violence. The U.S. media has literally turned 300 million Americans into Pavlov’s dogs.

The Cap Times: Mobile homes are affordable but some residents find serious downsides

Preview:

Gina began seeing problems with her mobile home the first week she moved into the Evergreen Village in Marshall — not just little repairs, but major issues like a furnace burning out and feet falling through the floors.

“No one should have moved into that home,” Gina, who didn’t want to share her full name for fear of retaliation from the property managers, told the Cap Times. “We’re basically living in squalor and nobody really does anything about it. Every day of my life, I hope to get out of here.”

Nine years ago, Gina was forced to leave her apartment in the village of Marshall 20 miles northeast of Madison when the building was sold....

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

This article is so dumb that it refutes its own argument only a few paragraphs earlier:

“This is not where we want to be right now. I'm sure you know how horrific the market is,” Gina said. “Even as high and as atrocious as the lot rent is, where in the hell in Dane County am I going to find a place to rent for $585 for three people? I'm not going to find that anywhere.”

Is then followed by:

(Mobile home parks) also come with a host of challenges: Property managers often are limited on budgets to provide anything other than minimal maintenance, and rents can be exploited by out-of-state investors to make money off of vulnerable populations.

So let me get this straight, the tenants state that they live in the park because the rent is ridiculously low and then are surprised that the owner can’t afford to keep the property up and then are even more shocked when new owners raise rents? That’s like someone checking into the Tiki Motor Court for $19 a night lodging and then calling down to the office and complaining that the furniture is old and there’s a light bulb burned out.

Here’s the solution. Raise the lot rents to a level that the park CAN afford to bring itself back to life and 99% of the residents will be very happy indeed (plus fend off the wrecking ball of new development). But not the tenants quoted in this article because they would be unhappy if the park gave them a million dollars and would respond “wait why not two million dollars you cheapskate out-of-state owner!”

One final note: what’s up with this new hatred of “out-of-state” owners? Virtually every hotel, restaurant, shopping center, apartment complex, self-storage facility and Walmart is owned by an entity that is “out-of-state”. Is that supposed to be an insult or a conspiracy theory? Because it’s just plain stupid.

NBC 10 NEWS: Sen. Elizabeth Warren to visit mobile home park in Attleboro to discuss housing challenges

Preview:

(WJAR) — U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warran will visit a mobile home park in Attleboro on Wednesday to discuss the harmful effects of private equity on housing in Massachusetts.

She and other state leaders will tour Sandcastle Mobile Home Park on Wednesday morning.

In 2020, the I-Team's Tamara Sacharczyk spoke to residents of this mobile home park about rising rent costs and the push to bring back rent control.

Sandcastle Mobile Home Park is mainly populated by seniors on fixed incomes.

Currently, there's an effort to add a ballot question in Massachusetts to repeal the nearly 30-year ban on rent control.

Attleboro Mayor Cathleen DeSimone and...

Read More

Our thoughts on this story:

The truth is that private equity groups have saved literally thousands of mobile home parks from the wrecking ball by buying old parks, pouring millions of dollars of capital into repairing and replacing aging infrastructure, and raising rents to levels that fend off redevelopment. The late Sam Zell was part of a “private equity group” when he ushered in the whole concept of bringing old parks back to life in the 1990s when nobody else would lift a finger to save them. Over a million residents of these “private equity group” parks have a nice place to live because of these visionaries, and 99.9% of these residents would say that they are thrilled by their new living standards.